Eat Right
Answered by Meeta Lall, Nutrition Expert
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Question by: Vinod
I had previously asked u a question regarding a high protein diet but i did not recieve a reply and i checked the site periodically but did not find any reply too... Plz do reply... Thanking u in anticipation,vinod.
Answer : Dear Vinod, Pls bear with me - I will be reverting shortly. I am unable to revert with the complete answer due to some problems in my computer. Meeta
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Question by: ambika
mam,did u got my peveous Q plese reply,i need ur help mam ambikamy ID:- ambika.dhaanshri@yahoo.complz ambika.
Answer : dear ambika, your original query had earlier disappeared from my site. i had requested you to send me the query again - pls do so, so that i may reply meeta lall
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Question by: C
Madam. I find many malls selling RED Capsicum, Yellow Capsicum. How far are they good for health? Any advantages. Please also tell me the advantages of BROCOLLI. Many thanks.
Answer : Dear Raj Kumar, First, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying. Red and yellow capsicums are bright in color. Color indicates the natural presence of disease-fighting compounds called phytonutrients. This family of nutrients represents as many as 25,000 chemicals which act as antioxidants and help the body defend itself against damage. They protect us from diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and cancer, boost our resistance to diseases and infections and discourage the very process of aging. The more vibrant the color of the food, the healthier it is. To answer your question: red and yellow capsicums are good for health. However, given their exorbitant cost, it may be wiser to buy other brightly colored foods which are equally healthy - tomatoes, red apples, red grapes, red radishes, strawberries, beetroot, carrots, papaya, cherries, pomegranate and watermelon. Now for the goodness of broccoli: Eating broccoli is a good idea since it is rich in dozens of nutrients and packs the most nutritional punch of any vegetable. Rich in antioxidants like vitamin C and vitamin A, broccoli reduces the risk of heart disease, cancers and cataracts. For non-milk drinkers, broccoli is important source calcium. Broccoli provides good quality fiber. In addition to obvious nutrients, broccoli contains two important phytochemicals - indoles and isothiocyanates - which play a unique role in squelching cancer-causing agents in our body. So, yes, go ahead and eat lots of broccoli - as stir fried, in salads, in soup and even as a routinely-cooked vegetable. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Chakrat
I had recently undergone conventional surgery for piles.Can you suggest the diet I should follow for better stomach management and to prevent recurrence of piles in future as I have heard it depends a lot on what we eat.Warm regards,sajiv
Answer : Dear Chakrat, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying. Yes, diet can play a major role in preventing piles. The main cause of piles is chronic constipation. When one strains to evacuate constipated bowels, the pressure caused on the surrounding veins leads to piles. Treating chronic constipation is the only way to get rid of the trouble. First of all, you need to eat a high fiber diet which will keep the stool large, soft, bulky which passes through the bowel more easily and quickly. Fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and pulses are ideal sources of fiber. Include lots of them in your diet everyday. Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges, pears and pomegranates are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts. Whole grains: prefer dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida) products like white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice and brown bread. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Using laxatives to relieve constipation makes the bowels dependent upon them. Do not use laxatives at all. Instead, add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. Your wife may try soaking 10-15 black raisins (monacca) or 3-4 figs in warm water at night and eating them in the morning along with the water. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Cindie
I had complicated surgery on my Right foot a couple of weeks ago...what foods can I eat to accelerate the healing? Thanks, Cindie
Answer : Dear Cindie, Your meal plan should remain more or less the same as before the surgery. Since muscle tissue is being repaired, make sure you are eating an adequate amount of protein rich foods (milk & milk products - 3-4 exchanges or 300-400 ml; pulses - 1 exchange or 30-40 g; eggs/meat/fish/chicken - 1 exchange or 50 g and nuts - 1 exchange or 8-10 in number) as well as lots of fruits (at least two) and vegetables (with every meal). To avoid post-surgery stress on the liver, go easy on fatty foods (fried foods/snacks/fast foods/ whole milk & milk products etc). Try to avoid alcohol totally for the next couple of weeks at least. With best wishes, Meeta
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Question by: Murali
Hi Meeta, I am 25 yrs old. My weight is 63kg and height is 180cm. I look very thin and to that my face looks very dull and my cheeks have gone inside. So it makes me feel uncomfortable and i loose confidence about myself in office.Please suggest some diet and exercies so that i can become bit fat and also i get chubby cheeks. Eagerly waiting for your reply.Regards,Murali
Answer : Dear Murali, Your BMI (or Body Mass Index, a ratio of weight for height) is 19.4 which is well within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9; though on the lower side. Yes, you could do with putting on some weight - about 5 kgs - though I do not agree with the 'chubby cheeks' requirement. What you need to focus on is a healthy, glowing look and a feeling of fitness and alertness. You are right - you need a combination of both healthy food and regular exercise for achieving this look. First your diet. Are you eating as much food as you should be? Young men usually tend to eat on the run whatever they can get. Eating a balanced diet is very important for the healthy look. Here are some guidelines for the amounts of each food that you should be eating in a day: Cereals - 10 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one medium potato/ 3 arbis/ 1 small sweet potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) . Make sure you eat at least three main meals in a day along with two snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime. You may distribute these foods specified evenly over the day. Usually, breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three major meals; in addition, small snacks a couple of times in between meals keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each food. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. . Do not skip any meal. Eat even when you are not very hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. Now, for a glowing look, eat lots of: . protein-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, pulses, milk, paneer/cheese, curd/yoghurt, seeds and nuts. . Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are nature's most concentrated source vitamin E - a powerful anti-oxidant. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. . Vitamin A-rich green/yellow vegetables like broccoli, beans, capsicum, peas, carrots, pumpkin and sweet potato as well as green leafy vegetables. Papaya, apricots and all berries are loaded with antioxidants as are vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and melons. In fact, the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables in a day helps the skin greatly. . Drink enough water - 10-12 glasses every day - keeps the skin well-hydrated and washes away all toxic chemicals, pollutants and other impurities from the body. Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. This will also ensure that the weight you put on is the desirable muscle mass and not extra fat. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Murali
Hi Meeta, I am 25 yrs old. My weight is 63kg and height is 180cm. I look very thin and to that my face looks very dull and my cheeks have gone inside. So it makes me feel uncomfortable and i loose confidence about myself in office.Please suggest some diet and exercies so that i can become bit fat and also i get chubby cheeks. Eagerly waiting for your reply.Regards,Murali
Answer : Dear Murali, Your BMI (or Body Mass Index, a ratio of weight for height) is 19.4 which is well within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9; though on the lower side. Yes, you could do with putting on some weight - about 5 kgs - though I do not agree with the 'chubby cheeks' requirement. What you need to focus on is a healthy, glowing look and a feeling of fitness and alertness. You are right - you need a combination of both healthy food and regular exercise for achieving this look. First your diet. Are you eating as much food as you should be? Young men usually tend to eat on the run whatever they can get. Eating a balanced diet is very important for the healthy look. Here are some guidelines for the amounts of each food that you should be eating in a day: Cereals - 10 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one medium potato/ 3 arbis/ 1 small sweet potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) . Make sure you eat at least three main meals in a day along with two snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime. You may distribute these foods specified evenly over the day. Usually, breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three major meals; in addition, small snacks a couple of times in between meals keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each food. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. . Do not skip any meal. Eat even when you are not very hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. Now, for a glowing look, eat lots of: . protein-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, pulses, milk, paneer/cheese, curd/yoghurt, seeds and nuts. . Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are nature's most concentrated source vitamin E - a powerful anti-oxidant. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. . Vitamin A-rich green/yellow vegetables like broccoli, beans, capsicum, peas, carrots, pumpkin and sweet potato as well as green leafy vegetables. Papaya, apricots and all berries are loaded with antioxidants as are vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and melons. In fact, the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables in a day helps the skin greatly. . Drink enough water - 10-12 glasses every day - keeps the skin well-hydrated and washes away all toxic chemicals, pollutants and other impurities from the body. Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. This will also ensure that the weight you put on is the desirable muscle mass and not extra fat. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ketan
i am 30 yrs male having a weight of 50 kg.Kindly advise for right diet to increase weight.I am strictly vegetarian.
Answer : Dear Ketan, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying. How tall are you? For a height of 5'5", a weight of 60 kg is considered ideal. Since I do not know your usual diet and lifestyle pattern, I suggest that you increase your daily intake by at least 500 to 1000 calories to put on the additional weight. Remember, the weight you gain should be a healthy combination of muscle and fat. Make sure that you include adequate proteins in your diet. So while you have the liberty of eating foods high in refined carbohydrates, fat and sugar (chocolates, pastries, cakes, jam, ice creams, pizzas, burgers and sandwiches), you will need to balance these with healthy foods like cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses, nuts and seeds. You may also eat energy-dense fruits such as raisins/dates, fresh fruit juices and fruits such as banana, mango, cheekoo which are usually forbidden otherwise. You may add on these foods to your regular meals or as snacks in-between meals. Remember: . Increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. . Eat 5-6 meals - three main meals along with 2 snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime - regularly. Do not skip any meal. . Eat at meal times even if you are not hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. . Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. This will also ensure that the weight you put is the desirable muscle mass and not extra fat. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Amarjeet
what are the 10 essential steps to fight cholestrol.
Answer : Dear Amarjeet, The 12 essential steps to fight cholesterol are: 1. Forego cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. 2. Forego foods rich in saturated fats since these fats also raise cholesterol. Avoid red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. 3. Forego foods rich in trans fats which, like saturated fats, raise cholesterol. Vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods are rich in trans fats - avoid these totally. 4. Choose fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc 5. Include at least one omega-3 rich food in each of your meals every day. Omega-3 fatty acids-rich foods include fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) in your meals. 6. Try to use monounsaturated fats such as mustard oil and olive oil for cooking. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. 7. If you are a non-vegetarian, go in for lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. 8. A number of natural foods such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules or tofu); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh) have been proven to lower cholesterol. 9. Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. 10. Increase physical activity to at least 30 minutes on most days. 11. If you smoke, quit immediately. 12. Cut down on sugar and salt intake considerably. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ramanjaneyulu
pl provide cholestrol free food which a common man can afford.
Answer : Dear Raman, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying. Now to your question about cholesterol-free foods. The first step in lowering blood cholesterol is to forego cholesterol-rich foods. However, foods low in cholesterol may still be high in saturated fat or trans fat - other types of fats which raise cholesterol levels higher much more than cholesterol-rich foods. So, you need to eliminate or at least drastically limit foods that contain not only cholesterol but saturated fats as well as trans fats. Avoid: . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules or tofu); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). A recent study shows that certain foods, when eaten in combination, can dramatically reduce cholesterol levels. Combinations of almonds, soy protein, oats and barley can precipitate a 20 percent decline in LDL cholesterol levels, according to this new University of Toronto study. Fortunately, most of these foods are inexpensive and found in our homes. It may also do well for Indians to develop a taste for tofu (soy milk curd) and oatmeal both of which are easily available in our local markets. At the same time, you need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Increase physical activity to at least 30 minutes on most days. . If you smoke, quit immediately . Cut down on sugar and salt intake considerably With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nithin
I am 16 years old;My weight is 96 kgs and height is 6 feet and 1 inches.I work out everyday for an hour and jogging for 45 minutes but no improvement.Could u give me a appropriate diet.
Answer : Dear Nithin, You are a tall boy and I am happy to learn, a very health-conscious one. Let's address your problems one by one. First of all, if you have been working out so much (regular work out and jogging), I am sure your body composition is reasonably healthy with a considerable amount of muscle mass. This muscle mass also contributes to weight. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert locally who will first analyze your body composition and work out exactly how much weight from excess fat you need to lose. The expert will then also tell suggest appropriate measures regarding your diet and if required, even your form of exercise. Although I don't know anything about your food habits, I am suggesting a few basic habits which encourage healthy eating. At the same time, do consult an expert as soon as possible. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs which lead to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sundar
dear madam,i'm 27 yrs old 175cms and weigh 98kgs... i am well aware of the fact that i am obese... kindly suggest me a veg diet that'll help me in reducing my weight...
Answer : Dear Sundar, First of all, my apologies for the delay in replying. You are right - you need to lose about 20 kg weight. This will require changes in both your diet and activity pattern as well as close supervision of your progress. I suggest you consult a weight management consultant locally who will analyse your body composition and suggest appropriate measures and modify them if required to suit your lifestyle. Since weight gain is a result of unhealthy eating practices as well as an inactive lifestyle, I am suggesting a few healthy practices which will put you on the path of losing weight. At the same time, do consult an expert as soon as possible. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs which lead to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ambika
mam,did u got my peveous Q plese reply,i need ur help mam ambikamy ID:- ambika.dhaanshri@yahoo.complz ambika.
Answer : dear ambika, yes dear ... i have got your query and will be replying shortly. pls bear with me best wishes meeta
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Question by: phi
Dear Madam,Nice to speak to you,My question is, Is it danger to take curd along with eating fish items. Will this create any side effects?
Answer : Dear Phi, There is no scientific basis for this belief. In fact, in most of our Indian (and also continental) recipes require fish to be marinated in curd or cooked in milk/curd. Besides adding taste, the curd/milk actually cools down the spices and aids in digestion. That fish and milk/curd together cause white patches on the skin is mere myth. So go ahead and enjoy your rice, fish and curd with relish! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Jasindha
I'm a 15 yr old girl, 5 feet approx. My weight is increasing day by day and my schedule doesnt allow me to exercise. In a day i can only walk Upto a kilometre. Pl give me some suggestions for reducing my weight. Pl help me. I'm in distress. There's no time when fun of me is not made. as i cant exercise a lot pl tell me how to reduce my weight by changing my food style. I'm a non veg. Let me tell u wat i eat during d day:breakfast-a cup of green tea and a chappatilunch- half a plate rice n some vegetables or meatevenin tea- a cup of green tea n a chappatidinner- same as lunch and before sleeping a mug of milk.Pl try to email me too in this regard. pl help methanQ
Answer : My sincere apologies for the delay in writing back and a Happy New Year to you. May the New year help you in solving the weight problem. You have not mentioned your weight so it is difficult to assess how overweight you really are. But yes, if you are not careful at this age, it will soon become difficult to control it. But first one thing: DO NOT GET UPSET IF PEOPLE MAKE FUN OF YOU. Your writing to me is a positive step and positive people are not sensitive. So, forget about the teasing and focus on doing something about your weight. You need to understand that body weight is a result of calories in (the food we eat) and the calories out (metabolism, activity level etc). So you will need to modify both your eating and activity pattern if you are to lose weight. The food first: The diet you mention is not adequate. It does not seem to be balanced - that is, does not provide the required types and amounts of foods. Also, you need to cultivate healthy food habits. As a first step, I suggest you build on these . once you start making healthy food choices and establish a healthy eating pattern, then you can mail me your weight and then we will work out a suitable diet plan for you. So, what are good eating habits? Take note: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Start eating a proper breakfast and lunch-dinner. This will keep you going till the next meal without any urges to eat the wrong kind of foods. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. You mention that you have no time to exercise. Why not? You will need to make time - maybe get up half an hour earlier in the morning - and take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: anita
what is a blance diet for a sixteen month old girl child.is it a must to give vitamin drops to toddlers of her age.
Answer : Dear Anita, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. By the age of 16 months, a child usually starts eating most of the foods cooked in the household. Is your daughter eating routinely-cooked food yet? Remember, you need to be very patient, resourceful and not too serious. Your skill and ingenuity can guide your baby to eat and enjoy healthy foods right from the very beginning. Ideally, a good balanced diet for your baby should include: Cereals - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg). If vegetarian, substitute meat exchange with 1 exchange of pulse or milk Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Roots & tubers - ½ exchange (1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Green leafy vegetables - ½ exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 1/2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/ orange/ pear) Fats/ Nuts - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) But there is no hard and fast rule - if your child is unable to eat all these foods during the day, there is no need to panic. Since the baby's stomach is small, give small, energy-rich meals every 3 hours - this means about 5-6 meals in a day. Keep easy to give foods like fruits, biscuits and other homemade snacks - matthis, shakkarparas, etc - can be given. Also: . Offer only one new food at a time. Give it for a few days continuously until the baby learns to like it. Give small quantities of the food. . If a particularly food is persistently refused or disliked for no apparent reason, do not force it on the baby. Try giving the food after a few days. Tastes change and the baby may like the food later. . New foods should be given separately rather than in mixtures so that the baby becomes acquainted with the taste of each individual food. . A baby's appetite varies from meal to meal and day to day. Let the baby eat larger or smaller amounts on some days. . Do not force-feed - it can lead to vomiting. . Do not give too many colas, chocolates, ice creams or other fast foods to the baby - it sets the trend for bad food habits in life. . Give plenty of water particularly in hot weather. Small amounts of boiled, cooled water should be given 2-3 times a day and after meals. . Do not leave the baby's food standing for hours. Germs may grow in it which can make the child ill. . Do not give all the suggested foods together; this may make the baby overweight. Remember, the frequency of breastfeeding should be suitably reduced as the baby accepts more and more food. . Provide food for the brain. Talk and play with your baby, show your love, and be attentive. Praise and recognize the baby's efforts in learning to sit, crawl, walk and talk. As far as additional vitamins/minerals are concerned, there is really no need if the child is eating a balanced diet with the required amounts of fruits and vegetables. However, some doctors do recommend B-complex and iron supplements for infants. Do check with your pediatrician. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Krishna
Hi, I am an IT professional working for an MNC. My work starts at 3 pm. I'll have my lunch at 1 pm and come to office by city bus. I feel very hungry by 4. I am confused on what I should take and what not in those times. Please note I'd feel very hungry so a cup of coffee/tea with some biscuits wont suffice. I tend to take chat items like channa kachodi or tiffen items like chola batura or dosas. Sometimes I take fruit salad too. Please advise me if I am doing right and if its not what can be a better alternative.
Answer : Dear Krishna, There is no need to be confused. Most of your 1 pm lunch is digested by 4 pm so it is quite normal to feel hungry after 3 hours. There is no harm in snacking at this time since snacks refuel and keep you going till the next meal. They prevent bingeing at meal times. And as you have experienced, it is never quite enough to be satisfied with a cup of tea and some biscuits. So, you tend to eat more filling snacks. However, the choice of these snacks can be made healthy. Here are some suggestions: . Sandwiches - brown bread with cucumber/tomato or chicken-low fat curd dip or onion-tomato-peanut sauce or egg salad or any other low fat filling - are substantial and satisfying. Along with a cup of tea (preferably without sugar), this meal can be quite refreshing. . Poha/upma (made with little oil) containing peas, onion, capsicum and peanuts/other nuts. . Sprouts (moong, moth, chana) chaat with some potato/spring onion etc. . Fruit chaat made from low sugar/high fiber fruits like apple, pear, guava, orange etc. . Dal chaat (cooked dal with onion/tomato/coriander etc); a glass of cold skim/low-fat milk/plain (or salted) lassi with curry leaves. . A fruit yoghurt or smoothie made with curd and the fruit of your choice (add a dash of vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg). . A box bowl of crunchy fresh salad combined with paneer/tofu (soy bean curd). There can be many other combinations of healthy foods as long as they are low in sugar and fat. So avoid refined cereals (as in bhatura/kulcha/naan/etc) and cookies, cakes, mithai and sweet beverages. Avoid fried foods at this time totally. You can also keep a bag of mixed nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachio nuts, and peanuts), roasted chanas, unsweetened whole grain biscuits etc in your drawer. They provide a healthy break along with your tea/coffee. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: vilas
i recently suffered from typhoid and chicken pox. i am loosing my hair. what food should be taked by me
Answer : Dear Vilas, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. Don't worry, after severe illness, excessive hair fall is common. You will soon recover. Simple steps can help in boosting hair growth and health: . Since hair is primarily protein, you need to eat lots of good quality protein (eggs, milk, meat, pulses and nuts; soy protein - as beans, flour, nuggets, or tofu - strengthens hair and stimulates its growth). If you are a non-vegetarian, eat lots of fish: the essential fatty acids in fish oil add luster to hair. Fried, baked, gravy or grilled - try to fit in fish into at least one of your daily meals. . Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are high in vitamin E and help in growing vibrant hair. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. . Make sure you eat 4-5 exchanges of fruits and vegetables (about 2 fruits and 2 katori of cooked vegetables) every day. All berries - strawberries, raspberries, blue berries, black berries, cranberries, currants and purple grapes - are loaded with antioxidants. They lessen the negative effects of the sun's harsh rays on hair. Grab a handful of berries every day and feel the difference. Other vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, nectarines, lemon and guava are excellent. . Iron supplements (Fefol Z, Fesovit, etc) also help; check with your doctor. . Give up junk food - it is full of refined carbohydrates (maida, corn flour, etc) and fats. In fact, the traditional Indian diet combining roti (made from whole wheat flour which is preferably stone ground), pulses, curds and vegetables is ideal for health and of course, hair. . Drinking 10-12 glasses of water a day also helps. . Exercise regularly. This will also relieve stress and improve blood circulation. You also need to keep your scalp clean. Use a mild shampoo and condition your hair at least twice a week. Alternate with an anti-dandruff and regular shampoo. Rinse out the conditioner thoroughly to prevent residue build-up which makes hair look limp and dull. There are a number of other haircare measures which will reduce your hair fall:  Massage your scalp with oil (almond/ almond + castor oil/ olive oil/ coconut oil) at least once a week. Wrap a hot towel around your scalp so the oil gets absorbed into the hair.  Grind fenugreek seeds in water and apply on your scalp. Wash off after 40 minutes.  Curd and eggs are great conditioners. Whip them up together (with some oil) and apply to hair half an hour before a wash, and shampoo off with room temperature water. Henna, too, is a good conditioner but it makes hair brittle and easily breakable in the long run after prolonged use.  Don't brush or comb hair when wet, as it will break. First, remove the tangles from the ends of your hair, and then comb your hair from the entire length. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: anil
hello madam, im 22, and my weight is 67,(height 166cms). so i dont think im overweight, but my belly is over 37 inches,so how can i decrease my belly size.please say about diet to be fallowed and i am ready to do certain exercises if u wish.i daily jog for 30 min in the morning but i could not rescue of it, please help.
Answer : Dear Anil, You are right - you are not overweight. At present, your BMI (Body Mass Index - a measure of weight for height) is 24.3 which is well within the normal range (18.5 - 24.9) though on the higher side. Since you also are gaining fat on the belly, you may well be on the path to becoming overweight. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Belly fat is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. A waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor in men. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 40 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 20 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. This will also keep the fat away. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: kavi
M 25 years old. MY weight is 48 kg but M having belly n my stomach is not stiff wht to do
Answer : Dear Kavi, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. You have not mentioned your height - but I assume from your weight that you are on the thinner side. All the more reason that you need to ensure that you do not develop a paunch. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you: . Cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings. . Avoid high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. . Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. . Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. . Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some physical exercise regularly. Walking is a good habit to inculcate at this age. Walk for at least 40 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) which will improve muscle tone all over. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Combine your walks with strength training and/or yoga for at least 25 minutes 3-4 times a week. Or if you like, simply join a gym and train under a professional. But do keep walking. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: anurag
i am 35yrs of age,a cricket player what should i eat to keep my body and my skin healthy?
Answer : Dear Anurag, A cricket player needs a balanced diet which builds and maintains muscle mass as well as provides stamina to play long and hard. I assume that you play cricket at least 3-4 times a week and your activity level is moderate. To meet your requirements for all nutrients - calories, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and fiber - you need to eat foods from all food groups - cereals, pulses, milk, green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, fruits and fats every day. This forms the basis of a balanced diet. I am specifying the approximate amounts of various food groups that you need to consume every day. Cereals - 16 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice/ 1 large idli) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/ orange/ pear) Fats/ Nuts - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon oil/fat or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Make sure that you distribute these exchanges evenly over the day. You must definitely eat a meal about an hour before you play so that your body has a ready supply of nutrients required during play. Players especially need to keep their body well-hydrated. Drink plenty of water - 12-15 glasses every day. A balanced diet will also keep your skin healthy. Make sure you include foods rich in anti-oxidants and essential fats which keep the skin smooth, shining and healthy. These include: . Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are nature's most concentrated source vitamin E - a powerful anti-oxidant. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. . Vitamin A-rich green/yellow vegetables like broccoli, beans, capsicum, peas, carrots, pumpkin and sweet potato as well as green leafy vegetables. Papaya, apricots and all berries are loaded with antioxidants as are vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and melons. . Olive oil - Even 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil per week are enough to keep skin healthy. Use olive oil to stir-fry vegetables, flavor pasta dishes, and dress salads. . Flax seeds (alsi) help skin cells maintain their fluidity, flexibility and functionality. Add a spoonful of ground flaxseeds to your breakfast cereal for a healthy start of the day or add some flax seed oil to your milk, lassi/smoothie or salad. . Fish liver oils - both shark and cod - are concentrated sources of the vitamin. They are available as dietary supplements in liquid and capsule forms. Check with a doctor before starting them. To keep your skin healthy, avoid white foods such as sugar, potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, and sweets. Avoid sweets, chocolates, cakes and cookies. Avoid butter, ghee and lard totally - they sustain wrinkles. Eliminate or cut back on smoking as well as drinking tea/coffee/colas. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: HARISH
kindly tell me the foods that blackens hair and improving complexion.regards.
Answer : Dear Harish, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. I am not aware of any foods that blacken hair and improve complexion (that is, make it fairer). However, we can keep our hair and skin smooth, shining and healthy by a sensible choice of foods which are rich in anti-oxidants, essential fats and proteins. . Eat lots of protein-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, pulses, milk, paneer/cheese, curd/yoghurt, seeds and nuts. Protein powder drinks - easily available in health stores - in the morning jumpstart hair and skin repair processes. If you are a non-vegetarian, fish is esp. good since it packs a double punch of protein and skin-enriching natural oils. . Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are nature's most concentrated source vitamin E - a powerful anti-oxidant. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. . Eat lots of vitamin A-rich green/yellow vegetables like broccoli, beans, capsicum, peas, carrots, pumpkin and sweet potato as well as green leafy vegetables. Papaya, apricots and all berries are loaded with antioxidants as are vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and melons. In fact, the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables in a day help hair and skin greatly. . Olive oil - Even 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil per week are enough to maintain hair and skin health. Use olive oil to stir-fry vegetables, flavor pasta dishes, and dress salads. . Flax seeds (alsi) help cells maintain their fluidity, flexibility and functionality. Add a spoonful of ground flaxseeds to your breakfast cereal for a healthy start of the day or add some flax seed oil to your milk, lassi/smoothie or salad. . Fish liver oils - both shark and cod - are concentrated sources of the vitamin. They are available as dietary supplements in liquid and capsule forms. Check with a doctor before starting them. . Drinking enough water - 10-12 glasses every day - keeps the skin well-hydrated and washes away all toxic chemicals, pollutants and other impurities from the body. At the same time, you will need to: 1. Lay off the white stuff such as sugar, potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, and sweets. These foods are all simple carbohydrates which inflame the skin, make the pores larger and leads to a series of skin breakouts. Instead, go for complex carbohydrates as in whole-grain bread, brown rice and whole-wheat pasta. Avoid sweets, chocolates, cakes and cookies. 2. Avoid butter, ghee and lard totally - they sustain wrinkles. 3. Shake off the stimulant habit since caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Eliminate or cut back on smoking as well as drinking tea/coffee/colas which weaken the body and spoil your appearance. Instead, drink green tea which also provides a healthy dose of anti-oxidants. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sathya
my skin is very dry skin but i want smooth and shiny skin what food i have to take to change my skin
Answer : Dear Sathya, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. Keeping the skin smooth, shining and healthy requires foods which are rich in anti-oxidants, essential fats and proteins. . Give your skin lots of protein-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, pulses, milk, paneer/cheese, curd/yoghurt, seeds and nuts. Protein powder drinks - easily available in health stores - in the morning jumpstart skin repair processes. If you are a non-vegetarian, fish is esp. good since it packs a double punch of protein and skin-enriching natural oils. . Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are nature's most concentrated source vitamin E - a powerful anti-oxidant. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. . Eat lots of vitamin A-rich green/yellow vegetables like broccoli, beans, capsicum, peas, carrots, pumpkin and sweet potato as well as green leafy vegetables. Papaya, apricots and all berries are loaded with antioxidants as are vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and melons. In fact, the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables in a day helps the skin greatly. . Olive oil - Even 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil per week are enough to keep skin healthy. Use olive oil to stir-fry vegetables, flavor pasta dishes, and dress salads. . Flax seeds (alsi) help skin cells maintain their fluidity, flexibility and functionality. Add a spoonful of ground flaxseeds to your breakfast cereal for a healthy start of the day or add some flax seed oil to your milk, lassi/smoothie or salad. . Fish liver oils - both shark and cod - are concentrated sources of the vitamin. They are available as dietary supplements in liquid and capsule forms. Check with a doctor before starting them. . Drinking enough water - 10-12 glasses every day - keeps the skin well-hydrated and washes away all toxic chemicals, pollutants and other impurities from the body. At the same time, you will need to: 1. Lay off the white stuff such as sugar, potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, and sweets. These foods are all simple carbohydrates which inflame the skin, make the pores larger and leads to a series of skin breakouts. Instead, go for complex carbohydrates as in whole-grain bread, brown rice and whole-wheat pasta. Avoid sweets, chocolates, cakes and cookies. 2. Avoid butter, ghee and lard totally - they sustain wrinkles. 3. Shake off the stimulant habit since caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Eliminate or cut back on smoking as well as drinking tea/coffee/colas which weaken the body and spoil your appearance. Instead, drink green tea which also provides a healthy dose of anti-oxidants. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: John
I am 57 years active male. For about 5years my fasting sugar level is in the range of 140-165.My diet for lunch and dinner is 4 chapatis, dal, veg./nonveg. Occasionally some rice. BF is again chappati or paratha. Is there any chance to bring down sugar level by reducing diet-but difficult.
Answer : Dear John, A very Happy New Year to you. With or without medicine, a proper diet and exercise plan will be very effective in maintaining your blood glucose levels within the normal range. Contrary to popular belief, being a diabetic does not mean being sentenced to a lifetime of eating a few, selected foods day in and day out. The following tips will help you in making healthy food choices which are also tasty and satisfying: 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid rice and foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. About 50 g of chicken/fish is fine everyday. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. You may also try drinking soy milk which is ideal for diabetics - it is low in lactose (milk sugar) and saturated fats. At the same time, it does not contain cholesterol and is rich in good quality proteins. 8. Sugar/honey: It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Fats: Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works for diabetics. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. Yoga has specific asanas which are beneficial for diabetics - try to learn these from a professional yoga trainer. 20 minutes of yoga a couple of times a week will also maintain muscle tone. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: gomathi
what are the nutritient diet should take by the diabetic patient
Answer : Dear Gomathi, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. With or without medicine, a proper diet and exercise plan will be very effective in maintaining your blood glucose levels within the normal range. Contrary to popular belief. being a diabetic does not mean being sentenced to a lifetime of eating a few, selected foods day in and day out. The following tips will help you in making healthy food choices which are also tasty and satisfying: 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. You may also try drinking soy milk which is ideal for diabetics - it is low in lactose (milk sugar) and saturated fats. At the same time, it does not contain cholesterol and is rich in good quality proteins. 8. Sugar/honey: It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Fats: Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works for diabetics. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Cycling, swimming, playing tennis, aerobic dancing and rope skipping are also good. But let your doctor decide which and how much exercise is safe for you. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Joseph
I am 49yrs suffring from goute and diabite(fasting 140) can you suggect what to follow.
Answer : Dear Joseph, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying and warm wishes for a Happy New Year. Gout results from the deposit of extra uric acid crystals in the connective tissue and/or the joint space between two bones. When there is extra uric acid in the body (either because more uric acid is being produced, less is being excreted or when we eat more protein rich foods), the excess uric acid precipitates leading to gout. This means that what you eat and drink directly affects your intensity of gout. This is true for diabetes as well. The following tips will help you in making food choices which help both your gout and diabetes problems: Drink lots and lots of water: Drinking 10-12 glasses of water every day. Try drinking one glass of water for every waking hour. Watch your diet: . Eat complex carbohydrates - chakki-ground atta, bran, oatmeal, brown rice/bread etc. Avoid foods made from white flour (maida) such as white breads, biscuits, muffins, cakes, doughnuts and pancakes. . Limit the intake of pulses/beans to one serving a day (one katori cooked dal). Try tofu (soy bean curd) and eggs (1-2 eggs per week). Avoid protein-rich foods such as red meat (goat/lamb/veal); organ meats (liver, kidney, brain); shellfish (lobster, crayfish, prawns, mussels, oysters, crabs, scallops); fish (anchovies, mackerel, sardines, herring). . Totally avoid cauliflower, green peas, mushrooms, spinach, and asparagus. Instead, go in for vegetables and fruits rich in vitamin C such as cabbage, leafy vegetables except spinach, oranges, capsicum, green chillies and red cabbage. . Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and green peas. . Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. Red-blue berries and cherries are esp. good for both gout and diabetes. . Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. . Limit intake of high fat foods like oils/ghee/vanaspati/butter, gravies, whole milk (and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk), cream, ice cream, fried foods and salad dressings. . Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. . Drink low fat milk and make curd and paneer from it. This increases the excretion of uric acid in the urine and reduces the risk of gout by 50%. . It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. . Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. . Avoid or limit alcohol. If you must drink, space your drinks with a glass of water. This is esp. important for reducing the effect of gout. . If you are overweight, lose weight - but gradually. Rapid weight loss can increase uric acid levels. . Drinking tea, coffee and cocoa is fine. . Flaxseed (alsi in the form of powder or oil) is esp. good for both the conditions. Exercise regularly even if it is painful: Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. If you feel like it, try a couple of days of strength training (using weights) in a week. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nisha
Hi Mam, i have sent a query almost a month back. Not sure if u got it. So i am sending it again. My question is regarding phytoestrogens.Since wheat, flax, vegetables etc increase phytoestrogens in the body which act like estrogens, will it be harmful for us? Will it increase cancer risks which are related to this hormone?
Answer : dear nisha, i will be reverting shortly ... Happy New Year ... Meeta
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Question by: Mahek
hi, I would like to know a perfect diet plan for me.
Answer : I hope you got my earlier mail ...
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Question by: Pallavi
I have been really looking forward for this column....thanksI'm 19 yrs old..n i weigh only 40kgs....I have never gone above this figure...I look very thin...n its really worrying me....I eat both veg and non-veg....so can u pls suggest me a diet chart that can help me to put on a little more weight....n look more healthy....
Answer : Dear Pallavi, You have not mentioned your height so I cannot really comment on your BMI (Body Mass Index or weight for height ratio). You say you are very thin - well, there is no harm in being thin as long as you carry the thin look attractively. You seem to be an energetic young girl. Are you eating well? I am outlining below the amount of various foods that should be a part of your daily diet. Please check whether you are eating these foods in the required amounts. Cereals - 8 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1exchange = 30 g or 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1exchange = 50 g or 2 medium pieces or 1 egg Milk - 3 exchanges (1exchange = 100 ml or ½ glass or 1 katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1exchange (1exchange = 100 g or 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1exchange = 100 g or 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1exchange (1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1exchange = 100 g or one small apple/orange/pear) Fats - 4 exchanges (1exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Sugar/honey - 4 exchanges (1exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) I am sure if you eat your food in the given proportions and ensure a balanced combination of cereal, pulse/meat and vegetables at each main meal, you will soon gain a healthy look (even if you remain thin). Take your weight after eating this diet for a month. If you are still 40 kgs and want to put on weight, add on more pulses/meat/milk - foods that are rich in protein and will contribute to increased muscle mass and not the undesirable fat. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: jessy
which dry food is best for health? I don't want to become fat but i want to be healthy.
Answer : dear jessy, i hope you got my earlier reply meeta
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Question by: Kavitha
I have put on weight on my thye n hip area. can u suggest me some exciese tips or someother remide to get rid of it. coz it makes me feel uncomfortable.....
Answer : Dear Kavitha, Fat on the middle - hips, thighs and stomach - is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. Belly fat is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. A waist circumference greater than 35 inches is definitely a high risk factor in women. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. . Cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings . Also reduce your intake of high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. . Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. . Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. . Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. . At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. This will also bring your weight down. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: rocky
Well i have gain extra 15kgs of weight,so what should be my daily diet for reducing it.
Answer : Dear Rocky, As I do not know your weight and height, it is difficult to ascertain how much weight you need to lose. But since you have put on 15 kg, it means that you are eating more calories than you need to. So, on one hand, you need to reduce the amount of calories you are presently consuming. Following healthy eating habits will soon help you in cutting these down. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of pulses (esp. soybean), toned milk (and paneer made from it) and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. At the same time, it is equally important to increase the amount of calories you spend during the day. If you cannot go for a walk, try other things like aerobic dancing/yoga/strength training/jogging/walking on a treadmill at home. Do consider getting up early and going for a walk for 40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Once you start this, the pluses will soon make up for the lost sleep. Also become more physically active at home and at work: . Take the stairs instead of the elevator. . Park further than you need to. . Start doing household chores. . At work, get up for that glass of water from the cooler; walk down to your colleague's cabin for a discussion; step down for a brisk 10 minute walk or stretch yourself during the lunch break. . Running an errand nearby? Get on your feet instead of in the car. . At airports, walk around the terminal while waiting for your flight and avoid escalators and moving sidewalks. . During TV commercials, walk in place, climb up and down the stairs, or take a spin around the perimeter of the house. . Return your shopping cart to the front of the store instead of leaving it in the parking lot. I am sure this will set you on the path of weight loss . With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: asha
i m a working girl as per my work pressure i don't have time to morning walk or evening walk, plz tell me what is the right diet for me. last few month i have put on some weight plz tell me how to reduce the weight, and give me the proper chart of diet thank you.
Answer : Dear Asha, As I do not know your weight and height, it is difficult to ascertain whether you are overweight or not; and if overweight, how much weight you need to lose. But since you have put on some weight, it means that you are eating more calories than you need to. So, on one hand, you need to reduce the amount of calories you are presently consuming. Following healthy eating habits will soon help you in cutting these down. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of pulses (esp. soybean), toned milk (and paneer made from it) and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. At the same time, it is equally important to increase the amount of calories you spend during the day. If you cannot go for a walk, try other things like aerobic dancing/yoga/strength training/jogging/walking on a treadmill at home. Do consider getting up early and going for a walk for 40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Once you start this, the pluses will soon make up for the loss of beauty sleep. Also become more physically active at home and at work: . Take the stairs instead of the elevator. . Park further than you need to. . Start doing household chores. . At work, get up for that glass of water from the cooler; walk down to your colleague's cabin for a discussion; step down for a brisk 10 minute walk or stretch yourself during the lunch break. . Running an errand nearby? Get on your feet instead of in the car. . At airports, walk around the terminal while waiting for your flight and avoid escalators and moving sidewalks. . During TV commercials, walk in place, climb up and down the stairs, or take a spin around the perimeter of the house. . Return your shopping cart to the front of the store instead of leaving it in the parking lot. I am sure this will set you on the path of weight loss . With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Benoy
My weight is 64kg. My waist has increased by 4inchs from 32 to 36. What diet should i take to get back my original weight of 54?? I have no bad medical history like BP, Diabetics, etc.
Answer : Dear Benoy, I do not know your height so I cannot comment on your weight for height ratio. Although a weight of 64 kg does not seem to be too bad, you need to check the increasing weight right now. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. Belly fat is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. A waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor in men. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. . Cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings . Also reduce your intake of high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. . Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. . Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. . Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. . At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. This will also bring your weight down. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: shine
Dear madam,My son is 1.5 yrs old his weight is 9.9 kg( at birth 3.3kg). He is very lazy to eat food. I'm giving food by force. He drinks milk during sleeping only. He frequently vomits. Iron drops were given to gain weight for one month , that time he had enough appetite. Pls advise how to increase his appetite and what food and tonics to be given. Is honey good or not. some people say it has "Botulin" bacteria and should not be given.
Answer : Dear Shine, Your son's weight is fine. If it is any help to you, I have always had the same problem with my own daughter and being my first child, I was always worried for her . until one pediatrician asked me "Have you ever seen a child starve himself to death?" Today, she is a healthy 17 years old! My answer to you is: Don't worry. After the initial months of rapid growth, your son's physical growth is now slowing down - he needs fewer calories per kg body weight. Also, he is discovering a new world and obviously, is more interested in learning new things than bothering about food. So this explains his 'laziness'. My experience with force feeding was very bad. I would churn up khichdi, kheer etc in the mixi and force feed my daughter; most of the times, she would throw it all up! So, let the child be. Be strong and let him go without food for as long as he wants. When he is hungry, he will ask for food. Then, give it to him and enjoy the pleasure of seeing him eat with relish. Try getting him interested in some play activity or in the park; feed him while he is mentally preoccupied. Since he is a reluctant eater, try to make his meals small but frequent. Make his meals nutrient-dense foods by adding nuts, ghee/butter, sugar etc. Yes, honey is wonderful for children. To avoid any infection, buy a packaged brand. You may also check with your pediatrician about giving your son B-complex and iron supplements. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Priya
My four year old son is suffering from wheezing bronchitis. What type of food to be given to him. Is there any food restriction?
Answer : Dear Priya, First of all my apologies for reverting so late. Now for your son's problem. I suppose his condition is chronic - that is, he has been suffering from bronchitis for a long time? A healthy diet is very important for your son to avoid any food deficiencies. Give him a balanced diet: Include all food groups such as cereals, pulses (or meat/chicken/fish) and vegetables in each meal. Contrary to traditional customs, there is no harm in giving lots of fresh fruits to the child. They are rich in vitamins and antioxidants and will actually help in treating the bronchitis. Since it is difficult for the child to eat large meals, give him small ones frequently. Also try to make the meals nutrient-dense: add finely chopped nuts/ghee or butter/sugar to the dishes. Also, make sure that the meals are light and easily digested. Give him warm water to drink in-between meals; also, encourage him to take steam inhalation at least twice a day. For people with wheezing bronchitis, careful feeding with proper body positioning is important to prevent choking. Make the child drink liquids in very small sips; totally avoid foods with a round shape such as nuts, popcorn, hot dog pieces. Make sure the child chews the food properly otherwise the half-chewed chunks may enter the lungs. Also let the child rest before meals. Also give cough syrups away from meal times If you like, you can check with your doctor about giving your son some nutrient supplements. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: rita
I am 42 year old,female,169 cms,68kg wt-am i over weight?i am with no health problems-What should my diet be like and how much shoul i eat?iam working
Answer : Dear Rita, I envy you your almost perfect wt for height ratio (OR Body Mass Index with in your case is 23.8 well within the acceptable range of 18.5-24.9). so carry on eating what you are presently eating. at the most, you can step up your activity level within and outside the home and also exercise regularly - walk for 40 minutes 4-5 times a week so that you maintian this ideal ratio. With best wishes Meeta
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Question by: Yogita
My weight is 52 and height is 4'10". pl.give me advice to lose my weight.
Answer : Dear Yogita, You are not overweight at all!!! Why would you need to lose weight? Your BMI (Body Mass Index a measure for weight for Height) is 24 which is well within the acceptable range of 18.5-24.9. At the most, you can step up your activity level - within and outside the house - and also incorporate regular exercise into your routine so that you dont put on any more weight and also become fitter. With bes wishes, Meeta
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Question by: K.JAISHAKAR
Dear Madam, My name is jaishakar,i hail from Hyderabad,from past 3 years am suffering from obesity,though i regularly do go for GYM and maintaing proper DIET,i want to know wheather weight also increses due to Stress in work in software caompany and lack of proper sleep, My height is 5.7,inches and weight is 77kgs.Please give suggestions. I look forward hearing from you.
Answer : Ans Dear Jaishakar, You are indeed very health-conscious - this, in itself, will lead you to better health in later years. Yes, you are slightly overweight: your BMI (Body Mass Index which is a measure of your weight for height) is 26.6 which is above the acceptable range of 18.5 - 24.9. And yes, both stress and sleep do lead to weight gain esp. round the abdomen. Although you are maintaining a proper diet, I am listing some healthy eating habits - please include the ones you are not following already. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Also, what kind of regime are you following at the gym? I suggest you increase the strength training (exercising with weights) part of the workout to 20 minutes and restrict cardiovascular exercises (treadmill, cycling, stepper, rowing etc) to 20 minutes. This will ensure that you build up so much muscle that you lose weight even when you sleep! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Venkat
Madam,I am sending my query again,as it seems lost at your end.I am 71 yrs old,55kg in wt; 66install.I suffer from backpain,(spondylosis;also I have a prostrate problem ( frequent urination) my cholesterol levels are high,( triglycerides are300desirable (<200}. CAN u PRESCRIbe an ideal diet for me.Venkat
Answer : Dear Mr. Venkat, Your weight is fine for your age and height. If you have been maintaining this weight, then continue eating the food that you are presently eating. However, since your cholesterol and triglycerides levels are high, it may be advisable to avoid certain foods. Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in our diet. So, as a first step you need to cut down the fat content of your diet: You should not consume more than 2-3 teaspoons of added fat (15 g) in a day. This means that minimal amounts of oil should be added at the time of cooking. Also, choose baked, boiled, grilled, microwaved dishes rather than ones which have fried or have lots of gravy. . Cut down entirely on desi ghee, butter, vanaspati and palm oil. Stop whole milk and cheese/paneer/cream cheese, eggs/meat/organ meats, fried foods, fast foods, baked goods like biscuits/cakes/pastries/pies, snacks and munchies like chips/nachos/namkeens as they are all high in harmful fat. . Triglycerides are also made in our body from sugar and alcohol. Reduce your sugar intake: avoid adding sugar to food or drinks, desserts, mithai, baked goods, candy, chocolates, soft drinks, fruit juices (fresh or packaged), fruit drinks, smoothies, packaged flavored milk/coffee, sweetened cereals, flavored yogurts and energy bars. In addition to potatoes, you will also need to cut down concentrated starchy foods such as pasta, rice, rolls, pizza, popcorn, and also many fat-free foods and ready-to-eat cereals. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. Even a one-time drinking binge can significantly increase triglycerides. INSTEAD, CHOOSE: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). Research shows that increasing physical activity is very helpful in lowering triglycerides. Start walking for 30 minutes 4-5 times a week. This will also help your back pain (but do check with your doctor first). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ram
dear mademi am 29years old male.height 163 cm and weight80Kgs. i am i over weight? what should me my weight? i work in the office. i am non vegitarian. everyday i eat meat, breakfast at 7.30 am tea at 10.00 am meals at 1.00 pm and tea at 4:00 pm. dinner at 8:oo pm. i sleap atleast 9-10 hours per day . so please tell me what should m\be my diet and my weight.thank you
Answer : Dear Ram, I hope you received my earlier reply. Meeta
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Question by: ram
i am 30years old man. i am 80 kgs and my hight is 163. i work at a office. i am a nonvegiterian. i eat either fish or meat everyday for lunch and supper. what is my ideal body mass and how many kgs i should be according to my height? what food i shoul take and what not?ram prasad varma: kenya
Answer : Dear Ram, At present, your BMI (Body Mass Index, a measure of weight for height) is 30.1 which classifies as overweight/obese (normal range = 18.5 - 24.9; overweight = 25.0 - 29.9; obesity, class I = 30.0 - 34.9). Although your ideal weight should be around 57-58 kgs, it is neither advisable nor possible to achieve this weight. Instead, you need to lose about 15 kg - a weight of 65 kg will bring you within the acceptable BMI range. Now, how to go about this? First of all, you need to understand that sustainable weight loss is a gradual process - your target weight loss should be about 1-2 kgs per month. This means that you can easily achieve the target 15 kgs loss within a year! (Beware of weight management consultants who promise you this weight loss within 3-6 months - this weight comes back even more easily and faster). Secondly, our weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. Any weight loss plan can be successful only if fits into our routine well. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? Now, after the weight loss basics are clear, you first need to make healthy eating habits a part of your routine. These form the basis of the weight-reducing diet that I am going to suggest for you. Some basic healthy eating habits include: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. Now, for your diet chart: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk, low fat - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots and tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 1 medium potato or 3 small arbis) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. You mention that you eat meat and/or fish everyday - I suggest that you continue eating fish once a day but totally give up red meat (goat, sheep, lamb, keema (minced meat), and organ meats) or have it twice a month. Try eating chicken or duck 3-4 times a week. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: natraj
helo mam,juz brief me on wht is the ideal diet to have i.e. for breakfast,lunch and dinner--also i build my body,lifting weights.i have 2 egg whites daily,stay out of sweets and sugar-so can you suggest me any ideal VEG diet so as to build the muscle mass.i dont prefer any muscle supplements,so suggest me an ideal diet sheet.also what is the ideal time to relax body after a work out and the next one.i heard its 12hrs,so how time does body take to recuperate after a workout session.hope u help me out with the needful.---thanking you mam--natraj
Answer : Dear Natraj, You have not mentioned your age - are you an adult or a teenager? Your diet will really depend on this. In any case, you are wise to stay away from sweets and sugar. And yes, you can adequately build muscle on a vegetarian diet. You will need to eat lots of protein rich foods such as: . Milk and milk products (curd, paneer, cheese, etc) . All pulses esp. soybeans (as beans, milk, tofu) . Nuts (almonds, walnuts, cashew nuts, pistachio nuts etc) and seeds (melon, pumpkin, sunflower, etc) . Peas and beans . Cereals such as wheat, rice, corn etc In addition to foods that naturally have a lot of protein in them, there is no harm in buying protein supplements such as protein powders which can be added to milk, custard, curd etc; protein-fortified biscuits and other cereals. Protein needs to be consumed frequently throughout the day, especially during/after a workout, and before sleep. For vegetarians, combining proteins from different foods improves the quality of the protein. For e.g.: combining rice and dal, milk and dalia/suji/wheat flakes, and corn and beans improves the protein quality considerably. Now for the rest bit: Exercise does stress out the body and can cause microtears in the connective tissues and muscle. However, given a protein rich diet and adequate rest, the tissues repair themselves at a higher level resulting in increased muscular strength, endurance, bone density and connective tissue toughness. To avoid overtraining, the body part exercised needs at least a day of rest, which is why some health experts say one should exercise every other day or 3 times a week. Also, stopping excessive exercise suddenly can create mood swings and feelings of depression and agitation If you let me know your age and activity pattern, I can suggest an appropriate diet chart for you. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ANJALEE
Dear Madam,I congratulate THE WEEK for providing this service. I am 38 yrs old, a patient of PSORIASIS, right now obese 80 kg, Ht 155 cmsObesity runs in the family.T want to know specially the constituents which have OMEGA 3 Fatty acid. Also suggest me the right food.Thanking you.Yuors trulyAnjalee RastogiD - 1357, Indira NagarLucknow, PIN - 226016U.P.Ph- 05224001912
Answer : Dear Anjalee, Losing weight at this age will ensure good health in later years. You need to lose about 20 kg - but this should be a gradual process. losing 1-2 kg per month is ideal: you should be able to lose your excess weight within a year. You will then need to work towards maintaining the new weight. I suggest a 1200 calorie diet for you to start with. Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg). If you are a vegetarian, substitute with one exchange of pulse. Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/ orange/ pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Make sure that you distribute these exchanges evenly over the day. Usually, breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three major meals; in addition, small snacks a couple of times in between meals keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each exchange. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. At the same time, I suggest you adopt a few healthy eating habits which will start you on the path of weight loss and also keep you healthy throughout life. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of pulses (esp. soybean), toned milk (and paneer made from it) and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1, start exercising. I always suggest walking for 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. Now, the omega-3 rich foods: . Fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); . Fish oil supplements; . Flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; . Walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nazeem
My body weight is 105kgs, i need to reduce my body weight, please send me a diet chart.
Answer : Dear Nazeem, A weight of 105 kg is definitely high: I suggest you consult a weight loss expert locally who will analyze your profile in terms of age, weight, height, body composition etc and then guide you on a day to day basis. In the meantime, I suggest you adopt a few healthy eating habits which will start you on the path of weight loss. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of pulses (esp. soybean), toned milk (and paneer made from it) and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, start exercising. Weight loss is a combination of sensible eating and regular exercising. Take up jogging, swimming, playing tennis/badminton, dancing or even walking regularly 4-5 times a week. If there is a gym nearby, go ahead - join it. Don't be self-conscious. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: INDRAJEET
Madam, I am doing BE in Karnataka. My age is 19. But my weigth is about 92. so i am doing dieting. please give me idea on what to eat and what not to eat. also give information about the online consultants to help like us peoples.
Answer : Dear Indrajeet, A weight of 92 kg is definitely high: Though I do not know your height, I guess you are overweight by about 20-25 kgs - but do not worry. Some of this excess weight will be adjusted when as you gain height in the coming years. The rest will go away if you eat sensibly and become more physically active. I do not recommend any kind of severe dieting at all - instead, adopt a few healthy eating habits which will start you on the path of weight loss and also keep you healthy throughout life. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of pulses (esp. soybean), toned milk (and paneer made from it) and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1, start exercising. You will need to exercise daily - take up jogging, swimming, playing tennis/badminton, dancing or even walking. If there is a gym nearby, go ahead - join it. Don't be self-conscious. Once you can confidently say that you do eat healthily, we will work out a diet plan for you. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! I do not have much knowledge about other online consultants . I suggest you type in the key words and find out. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Venkat
Madam,I had sent aquery about a week back.Please replyVenkat
Answer : Dear Mr Venkat, I do remember that you had sent me a query some time back. I had replied that i will be shortly reverting to you ... but somehow the original details in the first query were also lost at that time. can you pls resend them to me? i will reply within a day of getting them, i promise. with best wishes, Meeta
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Question by: Varsha
I am 17 years old and my BMI is 29. I am a vegetarian and I would like to follow a diet chart in which I get all the necessary nutrients which are needed for this age. I have totally given up on junk food for the past 2 months and I exercise twice weekly. I am also anaemic and have very irregular periods.
Answer : It is good that you have given up on junk food - indeed, this is the first step for effective weight loss. But exercising twice weekly may not be enough. You will need to exercise daily - take up jogging, swimming, playing tennis/badminton, dancing or even walking. If there is a gym nearby, go ahead - join it. Don't be self-conscious. If you are anemic, I suggest you consult a physician who will first ascertain the cause of your anemia. If it is due to lack of iron in your diet, he will probably prescribe a good iron supplement like Fefol Z. Start taking it immediately - most likely it will also cure your irregular periods. But do mention this fact to him/her. Now for your diet. You are a young girl in her teens and will be gaining height . this means that if you eat sensibly (as you have already given up junk food), some of your excess weight will be re-distributed. In any case, at your age, I do not recommend any kind of severe dieting at all. You just need to adopt healthy eating habits and exercise more vigorously and more regularly. This combination will put you on the path of weight loss. In the meantime, I suggest you adopt a few healthy eating habits which will start you on the path of weight loss and also keep you healthy throughout life. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of pulses (esp. soybean), toned milk (and paneer made from it) and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1, start exercising. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: lalitha
i am 53,my wt. is 92 kg. iwish to bring down my wt. please advise me on a diet plan..i walk in the evenings when i get time .still i cant seem to get my wt down.
Answer : Dear Lalitha, Although you have not mentioned your height, a weight of 92 kg is pretty high. My first guess is that you need to lose at least 25 kg to bring it in the 65-70 kg range. I suggest that you consult a weight loss expert locally who will analyze your profile in terms of weight, height, body composition etc and then guide you on a day to day basis. In the meantime, I suggest you adopt a few healthy eating habits which will start you on the path of weight loss. . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of fish, pulses (esp. soybean), milk, and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. A regular exercise regime is equally important. I always recommend walking for 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week combined with yoga for 15-20 minutes 3 times a week. If you can't take out 45 minutes at a stretch, break this down into 15 minute walks thrice a day - this is equally effective. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Kalpana
iam 41yrs old and slightly overweight, and iam found of eating veg and non-veg[fish].how can I decrease my weight by food.[weight=64 height=5.2inch]
Answer : Dear Kalpana, Your BMI (Body Mass Index - a measure of weight for height) is 25.8 which is slightly above the acceptable range of 18.5 - 24.9. So, yes, you do need to decrease weight by about 7-8 kg (this will bring your BMI to 22.6). But this should not be a problem and can be easily achieved if you follow healthy eating habits and become more physically active. I recommend the following: . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat lots of fish, pulses (esp. soybean), milk, and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. Besides adopting healthy eating, you need to exercise regularly. Take up walking for 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week. Also, become more active at home and at work . Take the stairs instead of the elevator. . Park further than you need to. . Start doing household chores. . Running an errand nearby? Get on your feet instead of in the car. . At airports, walk around the terminal while waiting for your flight and avoid escalators and moving sidewalks. . During TV commercials, walk in place, climb up and down the stairs, or take a spin around the perimeter of the house. . Return your shopping cart to the front of the store instead of leaving it in the parking lot. Remember, weight can be lost only through a combination of healthy eating and regular exercise. Also, weight loss should be gradual and steady: a loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. This ensures that fat (undesirable) and not muscle (desirable) is broken down and lost. I am sure if you follow these healthy eating habits, you will lose some weight. If you like, you may also consult a weight loss management expert in your area who can guide you on a daily basis. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Venkat
HAVE u recd my earlier query?Venkat
Answer : Dear Mr Venkat, Surprisingly, when i sent back the first answer, the original question disappeared!!! can you pls send your query again? sorry for the inconvenience, meeta
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Question by: Anil
I am 47 year old sugar patient.On 23rd october 2007 i siffered with Heart Attack.One Stunt is placed during Enjiography.Please suggest me the diet to be taken in breakfast,lunch, dinner.with regardsanil
Answer : Dear Anil, Your diet needs to be low in fats to prevent re-clogging of the heart arteries. At the same time, it needs to maintain your blood sugar in the acceptable range (below 100 mg/dl). Remember one thing: A healthy diet for the heart need not be miserable or boring. You need not deprive yourself of your favorite foods - just make healthy choices which keep your meals interesting and full of variety. . To keep the fat content of your diet low, do not eat more than 2-3 teaspoons (10-15 g) of fats and oils in a day. This means that very little oil needs to be used in cooking. Use healthy cooking methods such as shallow frying in a non-stick pan, micro waving, boiling, broiling, grilling, baking instead of deep frying or adding a lot of oil in shallow frying. . Use healthy oils such as mustard/olive oil, safflower/ sunflower/ soybean/ corn/ canola/ groundnut oil. Choose blended oils (containing a combination of healthy oils) specially designed for a healthy heart. . Stop eating the unhealthy fats such as butter, ghee, vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, mayonnaise and other readymade spreads. . At the same time, consume non-fat dairy products: Use double toned/skim milk and make curd and paneer from it. Readymade paneer and cheese are very high in fat - avoid. . Opt for low fat meats such as chicken and fish. Avoid red meat, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain, etc) totally. . High-fat foods like fried foods, namkeens, ready-to-eat curries, restaurant curries are definitely NO-NO. . Stop eating sugar totally. Mithai and ice-cream/other desserts as well as biscuits, cookies and brownies are out. Colas and fruit juices are out too. Instead, you can add variety and taste to your diet by going in for: . Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. . Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. . Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. . Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, pineapple and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. . Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. . Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. . Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. Though I do not know your weight and height, I suggest an 1800 calorie diet with the following balance of the various food groups: Cereals - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Skim/double toned milk - 3-4 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) You can equally distribute these exchanges over breakfast (1/4), lunch (1/4) and dinner (1/4) as well two small snacks (1/4). In addition, you should: . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. . If you smoke, quit smoking immediately. Besides food, exercise is very important for you. Walking for 30 minutes 4-5 times a week will keep your stent in good health for a longer period of time. However, check the type and duration of exercise with your doctor before starting. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Priya
My four year old son is suffering from wheezing bronchitis. What type of food to be given to him. Is there any food restriction?
Answer :
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Question by: Priya
My four year old son is suffering from wheezing bronchitis. What type of food to be given to him. Is there any food restriction?
Answer :
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Question by: vinod
i am a 30 yr old, my problem is the bulging waist line though i am a moderate eater, avoid nonveg food and exercise regularly but it doesnt seem to go down. about my heating habbits morning breakfast is milk and bread , eggs occasionally. lunch is chapathi 2-3 with litlle rice and vegatables/dal. i dont much in between, i have a cup of coffe ina day thats all. whats the right diet for reducing your bulge ath the abdomen
Answer : Dear Vinod, Even though you avoid non-veg and exercise regularly, are you overweight? Because fat on the abdomen is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. A waist above 40 inches in men increases the risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. Also, your food pattern for the day suggests that you eat only three meals a day. Also, your meals do not seem to be well balanced - for e.g., your breakfast does not contain any vegetable or fruit. As a first step, I suggest you adopt healthy eating habits which to a large extent, will help you control your weight and also, reduce your abdominal fat. Some basic healthy eating habits include: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: mk
i want to reduce my stomach for lover side.since i'm doing my reguler excise also but i couldn't do any ex.for reducing my abdamele stomach, pls help me thanks
Answer : Dear Mr. Kadan, Fat on the belly is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. For men, a waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. So, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you: . Cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. . Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. . Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. . Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. . At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: neeraja
i am a 14 yrs old girl,a school going child,with a weight of 63 kgs and height 5'4ft.i wanna ask for the BEST NUTRITION DIET which would be suitable for me and helps me reduce my weight.Is "green tea" really helpful to reduce our weight.is it healthy for me to take green tea every day ? How many hours of exercise is needed for me to maintain my body along with the diet ?
Answer : Dear Neeraja, Your concern for your health at this age is commendable. You are a fairly tall girl and your weight for height ratio (BMI or Body Mass Index) is 24 which is well within the acceptable range of 18.5 - 24.9 though slightly on the higher side. But this can also be easily brought under control. You are an adolescent who will be putting on more height in the coming years - this will adequately take care of the slightly extra weight that you carry now. There is absolutely no need to worry about losing weight at this stage. Dieting at this stage will interfere with all the physical, mental, emotional, sexual and social changes that occur in adolescence. So don't even think of dieting. Remember, adolescents who limit their nutrient intake may limit their ultimate adult growth. In fact, nutrition during adolescence is particularly significant for girls since they are being prepared for motherhood. So instead of eating less, you really need to eat the right kind of foods. Healthy food choices will help you use up the stored fat in your body and replace it with good muscle. This will also improve your looks. Your life is chaotic - with school, tuitions, sports, dance/music/art classes and yes, a growing social circle. Don't be too busy to worry about food. "Whenever, Whatever, However" should not be your mantra for food. . Never, never miss a meal. Don't rush out without breakfast. . Carry healthy home-made tiffin to school so that you just don't eat whatever is available in the canteen. In fact, totally avoid those greasy burgers, noodles, patties and whatnot. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses/meat, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. . Limit your fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Limit your intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Candy, cakes and chocolates are okay once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc). . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat more pulses (esp. soybean), milk, and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - parantha rolls, layered crackers, nut brittle (patti or chikki), yoghurt, fresh fruit, roasted chanas etc. Keep a handful of nuts in your pocket always. . Since you have less time to eat, go in for dishes that are small in size but big on nutrients: Have paneer or cheese instead of milk; smoothies combining fruit and milk; sandwiches layered with mushroom/chicken filling; rolls containing kebabs and vegetables. Such foods are not bulky, more interesting, and easy to eat on the run. . Limit fast foods to once a fortnight or even less. Fast foods provide large amounts of fat and simple carbohydrates but are low in iron, calcium, riboflavin, folic acid, vitamins A and C. . Drink lots and lots of fluids (preferably water) during the day. . Avoid cold drinks totally. Soft drinks usually substitute milk thereby lowering calcium intake. This can increase the risk of broken bones. . Since need for all vitamins and minerals are particularly high at your age, request your physician to prescribe you some esp. calcium and iron/folate supplements. Besides healthy eating, physical activity is particularly important at your age. Experts recommend that all adolescents should participate in moderate physical activity (15 minutes of running or 30-40 minutes of brisk walking or 45 minutes of playing volleyball) on most, if not all, days of the week. Remember, inappropriate eating at this age can lead to eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating. I hope my tips will help you in staying away from such a situation. GREEN TEA: A rich source of beneficial antioxidants, green tea prevents cancer; guards against heart disease; promotes longevity and eases indigestion and diarrhea. Research shows that green tea accelerates the burning of fat - this property is great news for weight watchers. So, go ahead: include 2 to 4 cups of green tea a day, hot or iced. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: R.MAHENDRAN
I am suffering from severe acidity for the last 5 years inspite of diet restrictions. Please adice regarding the food habits .with regards,(R.MAHENDRAN)
Answer : Dear Mahendran, Simple lifestyle changes can deal with your acid problem in the long run: 1. Avoid eating big meals especially at dinnertime since they cause the stomach to produce extra acid to digest the food. Instead, eat small meals frequently - 5-6 times a day. 2. Avoid foods that trigger acidity: Alcohol; beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea and colas); citrus fruits and juices; tomatoes and tomato sauces; chocolate; spicy and fatty foods. Beer is worst for acidity - it could double your stomach acid within an hour. Also cut down on foods made from refined grains such as maida and corn flour (pasta/noodles/white bread/biscuits/naan/bhaturas/buns). Instead, include high fiber foods such as whole grains (whole wheat flour/bread/brown rice/whole wheat pasta), legumes with husk, fruits and vegetables in each meal. 3. Don't drink too much fluids including water along with the food. 4. Try to eat dinner at least 1-2 hours before sleeping. 5. After eating, maintain upright position for at least 45 minutes. Don't do any vigorous activity like gardening which requires you to bend for at least an hour after eating. 6. Keep your head elevated by 6-8 inches when lying down. A lot of people try drinking milk to ease acid stomach before sleep. Though milk may provide a quick fix, it actually encourages the secretion of more acid during sleep. Try a small snack such as crackers before going to bed. 7. If you're overweight, lose the extra pounds. Obesity increases abdominal pressure, which can then push stomach contents up into the esophagus. 8. Don't wear belts or tight-fitting clothes around the waist. 9. Stop smoking. 10. Keep a heartburn record. Record what triggered your acid reflux episodes, the severity of each episode, how your body reacts, and what gives you relief. The next step is to take this information to your doctor so the both of you can determine what lifestyle changes you will need to make and what treatments will give you maximum relief. 11. Many people report that chewing gum relieves acidity. Though it is not clear how effective chewing gum actually is in treating heartburn. Nevertheless, chewing gum after meals is certainly worth a try. 12. Antacids provide quick, but brief, relief. Within an hour, the acid again accumulates in the stomach. The best way to take antacids, therefore, is approximately one hour after meals or just before the symptoms of reflux begin after a meal. Try another dose approximately two hours after the meal again. I hope these tips solve your problem forever . With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: subrahmanian.p
Dear MadamI m 46 years oid. I m diabetic for the last 8 years. I do regular excercises, weighing 64kg, height is 168".I m not on medication. Occasionaly, I drink alcohol.Kindly suggest a menu for me. How do I know which vitamin I should take/lack?Thanking youYours sincerlySubrahmanian>P
Answer : Dear Subrahmaniam, I appreciate your disciplined approach to diabetes. It is a great thing that the doctor has still not put you on medication despite having diabetes for the last 8 years. This shows that you have been able to maintain good sugar levels by controlling your diet and exercising regularly. Indeed, proper diet and adequate exercise are the most effective mantra for keeping diabetes in check. You are also maintaining an ideal body weight. Ideally, I would like to suggest that you continue eating and exercising the way you have been doing for so many years. And since you do not have any other problems, your vitamin intake also seems to be adequate. Nevertheless, there is no harm in checking with your physician about additional mineral/vitamin supplements. Instead of suggesting a specific diet for you, I am listing a few tips which will help you in making healthy food choices which are also tasty and satisfying: 1. Go in for whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Have dals especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Eat vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Choose low fat milk and curd/paneer made from it. You may also try drinking soy milk which is ideal for diabetics - it is low in lactose (milk sugar) and saturated fats. At the same time, it does not contain cholesterol and is rich in good quality proteins. 8. Avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Don't start artificial sweeteners. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. Keep up with your exercise routine. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Dr
i am a prediabetic plz advise me regarding my diet especially in the diet
Answer : Dear Dr Sreelatha, Pre-diabetes is the road to full-blown diabetes. Here, blood glucose levels are higher than normal (101-125 mg/dl) but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. At this stage, lifestyle modifications with a balanced diet and regular exercise can prevent diabetes. It is more a question of making healthy food choices and becoming physically active so that you maintain your body weight within acceptable limits. Make healthy food choices by choosing: 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. You may also try drinking soy milk which is ideal for diabetics - it is low in lactose (milk sugar) and saturated fats. At the same time, it does not contain cholesterol and is rich in good quality proteins. 8. Avoid sugar/honey: Occasional (once a fortnight) indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Avoid artificial sweeteners: Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. Become physically active: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really prevents diabetes. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Cycling, swimming, playing tennis, aerobic dancing and rope skipping are also good. But let your doctor decide which and how much exercise is safe for you. Certain asanas in yoga are specially meant for preventing diabetes - consult a professional yoga trainer for this. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sanitha
Hello Madam!, I am a low BP patient. I have not checked my BP level, But came to this conclusion that I have low BP because whenever I feel light headed, i take Rice soup with salt and get better. Please advice me about my diet.
Answer : Dear Sanitha, How can you say that you are a low blood pressure patient without getting it checked? We usually feel light-headed when we are low on energy - a condition called hypoglycemia. This means that there is not enough sugar in the blood to perform various body functions as well as work etc. Rice soup is a quick fix to this problem. I am sure you would feel equally good if you had a couple of biscuits with tea or any other snack. So, you need to do two things: One, get your blood pressure checked by a doctor and let's see what he says. Second, you need to develop a healthy eating pattern to avoid hypoglycemia which usually occurs when one has not eaten for a very long time. I hope the following tips help you: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes a sharp dip in blood sugar which leaves you feeling low, miserable, tired and lightheaded. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals so that your body gets all the required nutrients in the correct amounts. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Limit your intake of sugar and starches. These quickly boost your blood sugar and make you happy; however, the subsequent sugar low - causing lack of energy, fatigue, aches and illness - is equally fast. Keep away from this roller coaster ride of feeling well and feeling ill by avoiding pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Instead, eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since these foods release sugar into the blood gradually and prevent the sugar high and sugar low. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anil
I am 47 year old.4 year back sugar was traced on my body,but that was not much high.on 23rd of October 2007 i was suffered with Heart Attack.90 blockage was removed from the vains and one stunt is placed.Please suggest me the diet chart for the future life.I will be greatful to youWith Best Regards,Anil Kumar
Answer : Dear Anil, I have received your query. I am working on your answer in detail and will be reverting to you latest by next week. Kindly bear with me. with best wishes meeta
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Question by: Nis
Hello Mam, i am little bit concerned about vatamin-D intake by my body. I came to know recently that vitamin D isavailable in abundance in sunlight and there are very less food items which can provide it. I heard that sunlight between 10.00am and 3.00pm can only help the body in synthesizing Vit-D,and exposure at any other time is of no use.I never go out in the sun especially after 10.00, coz i am worried about getting tanned.So how can i get enough of Vit-D(200IU per day,plz correct me if i am wrong).How much milk should i drink to get enough vitamin D for a day? Is fortified milk good for this or can i get it from ordinary milk or toned milk?
Answer : Dear Nisha, Yes, about 200 IU of vitamin D per day is usually considered an Adequate Intake for 19-50 year olds. In later years, about 400 IU are required since the body's ability to synthesize it from sunlight decreases. As you know, it is nearly impossible to get adequate amounts of vitamin D from your diet. Sunlight exposure is the only reliable way to generate vitamin D in your own body. A person would have to eat about 10 eggs (20-25 IU per egg) just to get minimum levels of vitamin D into their diet! Research suggests that 10-15 minutes exposure to sunlight twice or thrice a week is enough to satisfy the body's vitamin D requirement. I suggest you try this - it will not tan you so much. But don't use sunscreen (even weak sunscreens (SPF=8) block your body's ability to generate vitamin D by 95%) otherwise the purpose will be lost. Window glass, clothing and air pollution also diminish the synthesis - keep your face, arms and legs (if possible) exposed. You may also eat foods naturally rich in the vitamin - egg yolk, liver and fatty fish (sardines, mackerel, tuna, eel and salmon). Fortified foods like milk powder and vanaspati are also good sources. I am not aware of any Indian brands of milk which are fortified with vitamin D (though most are fortified with vitamin A). However, some brands of soy milk and breakfast cereals may be fortified - do read the labels. Fish oils - cod and shark liver oils - are concentrated sources of the vitamin. You may try eating one capsule per week. This should be sufficient. However, do check with your physician before you start this. CAUTION: Excess Vitamin D is stored in the body and can cause toxicity with dire consequences. Routinely consuming large amounts of cod liver oil (as oil or capsule) can cause vitamin D toxicity. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nikesh
Hi mam, i am a 23 year old male, 173cm weighing 90kg.I used to go to jim for around 6 months and stopped after that. I have put on more weight ever since. Do we gain more weight if we stop working out. I am doing very less physical activities now-a-days. Could you please suggest a suitable diet plan for me? I want to bring down my weight to around 66-70kg which would be ideal for me.Also are there any specific exercises that i should do to burn down the extra calories and obtain the correct weight? Please help.
Answer : Dear Nikesh, Yes, reducing your weight to about 70 kg is a good idea. When we exercise, our body gets the required energy by burning stored fat - this is how we lose weight. At the same time, we also build muscle which boosts metabolism and our body burns more calories and we lose even more weight. This is what happened with you. You worked out at the gym and also built muscle, so you lost weight. But once you stopped exercising, your body had a surplus of calories - this was again converted into fat and stored in the body and this is how you gained back the weight you had lost! What you need to understand is that weight loss is a very fine balance between calories in (what we eat) and calories out (what we use up for work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. So you need to get active once again - but if you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise you like. I always suggest walking for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week as an ideal exercise. For a young man like you, combining walking with 20 minutes of strength training (exercising with weights) 3 times a week would be ideal. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. At the same time, you need to take charge of your diet. As a first step, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. I suggest a 1500 calories diet for you. The distribution of calories over the various food groups for you should be: Cereals - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots and tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 1 medium potato or 3 small arbis) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. Also: Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat more pulses (esp. soybean), milk, and 8-10 nuts everyday. Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. Remember, weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. Drastic weight losses play havoc with our body systems and weight lost fast also comes back fast. At the same time, any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well and should teach us to eat right and exercise right for life. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: vijayaramachandran.R
irrespective of my food, my problem is that i look very thin. I am 38 years old, and about 6 feet tall, weighing only about 58 kgs. Can you suggest some routines, which will improvise. I play badminton for about 1 hour daily, wake up at 5.00am and sleep at around 10.30 pm with roughly 3 course of vegetarian food a day! please suggest.
Answer : Dear Vijaya, You are quite underweight and need to put on at least 8-10 kgs. Since I do not know your current diet and lifestyle pattern, I suggest that you increase your daily intake by at least 500 to 1000 calories. Caution: The weight you gain should be a healthy combination of muscle and fat. Make sure that you include adequate proteins in your diet. So while you have the liberty of eating foods high in refined carbohydrates, fat and sugar (chocolates, pastries, cakes, jam, ice creams, pizzas, burgers and sandwiches), you will need to balance these with healthy foods like cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses, lean meats like chicken and fish, nuts and seeds, raisins/dates, fresh fruit juices. You can even eat energy-dense fruits such as banana, mango, cheekoo which are usually forbidden otherwise. You may add on these foods to your regular meals or as snacks in-between meals. Remember: . Increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. . Eat 5-6 meals - three main meals along with 2 snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime - regularly. Do not skip any meal. . Eat at meal times even if you are not hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. . Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anand
Hi mam, I am 30 years old male. My height is 173cm and weigh 84kg. I know i am overweight. Can you please suggest me a diet plan? Could you also provide a diet plan for my wife who is 26 years old, height 154cm and weighing 49kg. She has the correct weight for her height but we would still like to get a plan from you to make sure that she eats the right food.
Answer : Dear Anand, Though you are fairly tall, you are overweight (Your Body Mass Index or weight for height ratio is 28.0 which is above the acceptable range of 18.5 - 24.9). Losing about 12-15 kgs will put you in the acceptable BMI range comfortably. So, what should you do? Obviously, you are consuming more calories than you need. I assume that your activity level is also sedentary. This means that you are burning fewer calories and all the extra calories you eat are being converted into fat and getting stored in your body. So, you need to consume fewer calories, and at the same time, burn more calories (exercise more). Though I do not know your current eating habits, I suggest the following distribution of calories over the various food groups: Cereals - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots and tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 1 medium potato or 3 small arbis) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Make sure that you distribute these exchanges evenly over the day. Eat 5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Snack a couple of times in-between meals to keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each exchange. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. Remember not to miss any meals since skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. In addition, you should: . Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat more pulses (esp. soybean), milk, and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. To burn more calories, you should take up some regular physical activity on a daily basis. I always recommend walking 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week - this is the best, sustainable and long term activity which does wonders for health. You may also like to include some stretch exercises (yoga is great) 2-3 times a week for 15-20 minutes. Remember, weight loss should be gradual and steady. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. This ensures that fat (undesirable) and not muscle (desirable) is broken down and lost. On the other hand, you wife is her ideal weight - and she can simply continue with her current routine. At best, she can check her eating habits with the additional tips I have specified above. She should also ensure that she exercises daily. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Bindu
Dear Mam,i am 21 year old indian studying in K.S.A.my weight is 70 and hight is 155cm. please suggest me the best diet to lose and control my weight.kindly respond to my Qs.
Answer : Dear Bindu, You are right to be concerned about your weight. At present, your weight to height ratio (BMI or Body Mass Index) is 31.2 which falls in the obese range. The acceptable BMI range is 18.5 - 24.9. You thus need to lose at least 20 kgs in order to come within this range. For this, you will need to: . cut down on the amount of calories you take in from food; . increase the number of calories you burn every day - through boosting your metabolism as well as stepping the activity level; and . Inculcate healthy eating habits which will ensure weight loss, and then, maintaining the lost weight. While it will be ideal if you could consult a weight management expert in your area, I suggest a 1200 calorie diet for you. This will ensure an ideal weight loss of 1-2 kg per month. The distribution of calories over the various food groups for you should be: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice/ 2 biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Note that it is best to avoid sugar/honey and to restrict the fat intake strictly if you want to lose weight. To burn more calories you should: Take up some physical exercise regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week and also 10-15 minutes of strength training (exercising with weights) a couple of times during the week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. At the same time, you need to inculcate healthy eating habits: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy and chocolates. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. I am sure if you start with these suggestions, you will be successful in losing weight. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: VIJAY
Ht.171cm.Wt.91kg.Vegitarian.Loves food.Age57yrs.Routine very active.take morning brisk walk for one hour.one cup tea in the morning,B/fast at 9.30, No table work, goes out to visit customers comes home for lunch 2pm.as per demand again goes out or attend office at home till 5pm.do yogic exercise for one hr. Dinner at 8-8.30 pm. NO SMOKING AND LIQURE. I want to weigh about 75kg.with waist measurement of 36inches.now I measure 38". Dr. help achive this.Thanks..Greetings. vijay
Answer : Dear Mr. Choudhari, You lead a disciplined life with regular food habits, no smoking/alcohol and consistent exercise. Also appreciable is the fact that you realize that your body weight should be around 75 kgs. As you know, body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). Since you are already quite active - regular walk and yoga - I suspect your overweight has more to do with faulty eating habits than lack of exercise. You need to correct these first; weight loss will occur automatically. I recommend the following: . First of all, write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Next, follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat; whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. Also, no salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . Eat more complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. . Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat more pulses (esp. soybean), milk, and 8-10 nuts everyday. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. In addition, you should: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. Remember, at any age - and in particular, your age - losing weight should be gradual and steady. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. This ensures that fat (undesirable) and not muscle (desirable) is broken down and lost. I am sure if you follow these healthy eating habits, you will lose some weight. If you like, you may also consult a weight loss management expert in your area who can guide you on a daily basis. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: toms
Dear madam,I want to reduce my body weight? At present my weigth is 95 kg, hegiht 5 feet 8 inch, waist 40 cms, in my family all are having little over weight. Please send me a diet plan to reduce my weight?RegardsToms
Answer : Dear Toms, Your weight to height ratio or the BMI (Body Mass Index) at the moment is 31.8 which falls definitely in the obese range. Ideally, this ratio should be within the range of 18.5 - 24.9. You will need to lose about 25 kgs to come within the acceptable BMI range. Remember: . Our weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 2-3 kg per month is ideal. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? . Research shows that overweight/obese people have faulty eating habits. Once these habits are corrected, weight loss occurs automatically. Developing healthy eating habits is, thus, the first step in losing weight. Follow these steps to eat healthy: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limit the intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. In fact, your entire family can start practicing these healthy eating habits. Involvement of other family members will also ensure that each one of you can stick to the habits. In addition to healthy eating, you need to take up some physical exercise regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. It will be ideal if you can consult a weight management expert in your area. The expert will then analyze your profile in terms of height, weight, body composition, lifestyle and activity pattern etc. He/she can then suggest a specific diet regime which fits well with your routine. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anu
dear doc!wish you well.My daughter aged 7 yrs had got infected with chicken pox 17 days ago.Now all the scabs have fallen,but she is still on strict diet of no oil,spice etc.I would like to know for how long she has to follow this diet.When can I give her normal diet?I would also like to know the infectious period of chickenpox.thank you
Answer : Dear Anu, You can start giving your daughter good, wholesome home-cooked food but with no spices or oil. Spices may hurt the sores in her mouth and oil makes food difficult to digest. Start off with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Give her fresh citrus fruits (oranges, sweet lime, strawberries etc), banana, cheekoo, grapes etc. You may also give her freshly squeezed fruit juice or home-prepared veg soups (carrot and coriander soup with a dash of lemon is especially recommended). Give her lots of vitamin C in the form of lemon - added to dal, water or soups. Then, start giving her dalia/suji porridge, khichdi and dal-chawal/curd-rice. Let her eat as much (or as little) as she wants. Offer small meals many times a day. However, keep her off junk food and refined sugars. After a couple of weeks, I am sure she will get on to the normal food cooked at home. Children with chickenpox are contagious or infective 5 days before the rash begins and until all the sores have crusted over, usually about 5 to 7 days after the rash begins. Once all the sores have crusted over (after 5 to 7 days), your daughter need not stay home anymore even though she still has scabs. It may take 2 weeks for all of the scabs fall off. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: mereena
My son aged 8 years always complains of leg pain at night. Even on the days he has less physical activity. Some say it is due to calcium deficiency. What foods must I include in his diet for this? He is fussy about having vegetables and meat
Answer : Dear Mereena, During childhood, the human body goes through an amazing series of changes. When babies are born, their heads, hands, and feet are proportionally much larger than their bodies. As they grow, the body changes proportions many, many times. Sometimes long, gangly arms and legs seem to shoot out over night! During these spurts of growth, children often complain of nighttime leg pain, hence the common label "growing pains". In any case, I suggest that you get your son checked once by a physician. If the physical examination is normal, then your child is experiencing 'growing pains'. The actual source of the pain has never been proven, but long experience has taught us that they are benign and self-limited. As the bones grow longer, the muscles or tendons are still a little too tight resulting in muscle spasms lasting from 1 to 15 minutes. During a pain episode, stretching the foot and toes upward will often resolve the muscle spasm. Gentle massage and moist heat over the painful spot can also help. In most cases, the pain can be prevented with simple, daily stretching exercises. These exercises must be continued even after the pain subsides in order to keep the muscles and tendons relaxed and able to accommodate the next growth spurt. Give your plenty of fluids - this should make cramping less likely. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: R.C.
24th October 2007I am going to be 71 years in December, still very active in financial business with my son, who is a Chartered Accountant from UK and I am the former Bank Chairman. I do lot of exercises and regularly play Golf. What kind of diet I should have? I have a cup of tea in the morning on the Golf Course with a toast without butter, a glass of coconut water at 11.30 a.m. in office, light lunch, a cup of tea with a biscuit in the evening and dinner - two small dry rotis, dal and one vegetable. I am a non-smoker and 90 vegetarian. Once in two/three months, a small glass of red wine. Regards. R.C. Suneja, Former Bank Chairman - 9810038757.
Answer : Dear Mr. Suneja, A Happy Diwali to you and your family. Do accept my apologies for delaying the reply. I think the way you have led life and are leading it today is ideal. Working forever keeps us healthy - physically, mentally and emotionally. Your routine and discipline are perfect. If you carry on just like this, you can look forward to years of good health. Your diet is perfect. In fact, you may try drinking a glass of wine more frequently - say, twice or thrice a week. Wine is full of antioxidants and prevents aging. Also, if you wish, you could check with your physician regarding some nutritional supplements such as Vitamins B-complex, C and E. Do write back for any query in specific. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: RAHUL
protien fruits
Answer : Dear Rahul, Fruits are usually not rich in proteins. Rather, they are a great source of fiber as well as vitamins and minerals which protect us from infection and disease. However, if you would like to increase your protein intake, then you would need to eat more foods like: . Milk & all milk products like curd, paneer, cheese and khoya . Soy Milk . Eggs . Meat, chicken and fish . All Pulses including soybean . Grains such as wheat, rice and corn, and . Nuts and Seeds . In addition, you may also buy protein supplements in the form of protein powders which can be added to milk, custard, curd etc; protein-fortified biscuits and other cereals etc which are easily available at health stores and chemists. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: K.
I am suffering from IBS since myyounger days.Now I am 53.I have consulted expert Allopathic and Homoeopathic doctors.But no improvement.I am more allergic tocertain kind of foods like prawns,caullliflower and fibre richvegetables.If I eat chicken and porotta I Have no problem of IBS.If there is any tablet or any other remedies please suggest.
Answer : Dear Sasidharan, Living with IBS does not mean deprivation, eating bland food, or never going to restaurants. Nor does it mean living on "rabbit food" from health food stores or following brutal elimination diets. However, it does mean learning how to eat safely. 1. The best way to handle IBS is to eat a healthy diet which is low in fat and high in fiber. The diet should provide about 25-30 g fiber. Increase the fiber intake gradually to avoid gas and bloating. Fiber-rich foods include: . Whole grains: Wheat bran is a great fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, muesli, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. . Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets . Fruits - Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, all citrus fruits (oranges, sweet lime, jackfruit) pears and pomegranates are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Since you are allergic to fiber-rich vegetables, it is best to get your fiber from fruits - eat at least 3-4 servings of fruits. Add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. . In addition you may like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. 2. At the same time, the fat intake of the diet should be low. The total fat intake for the day should be about 15-20 g. Use very little oil for cooking. Also avoid high fat foods such as whole milk and cheese, paneer, curd, khoya, ice creams etc made from it; fried foods and snacks; fast foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; butter and ghee; cakes, cookies and pies; chocolates and candy. 3. Drink lots of water every day - at least 1.5 liters fluids (mostly water and a couple of times, dilute tea, warm lemon water or vegetable juice). 4. Eat more frequent meals. Spread your daily intake over 3 meals (low fat and high fiber) and 3 snacks per day. Eat meals at regular intervals. 5. Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. 6. Relax after a meal. 7. Keep a food and symptoms diary. Keeping a diary of what you eat and what your symptoms are for a few weeks may be a good way to find out if a food bothers you. If you think a food makes you feel worse, don't eat it. . Exclude obvious trigger foods. But don't cut out foods unless they have caused you problems more than once. . Avoid foods high in caffeine such as tea, coffee, chocolates and soft drinks . Alcohol may also make you feel worse. Control intake. . If gas is a problem for you, you might want to avoid foods such beans, cabbage and some fruits that make gas worse. . Try excluding lactose containing foods - milk and milk products like paneer, cheese, khoya, mithai, ice cream, custards, puddings, kheer, etc Stress usually triggers symptoms in people with IBS. Try regular exercise (walking is best), relaxation training or meditation. Your doctor may also suggest that you talk to a counselor about things that are bothering you. Adequate sleep is also important. While there is no cure for IBS, your doctor may prescribe medicines to help you manage or lessen your symptoms. Since medications affect people differently, work with your doctor to find the best combination of medicine, diet, counseling, and support to control your symptoms. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Rajinder
Dear Ms. Meeta Lall,First, you have got a beautiful first name.Now, my query. I am 43 years old male legal professional. I often leave home in a hurry and can eat breakfast only in my staff bus. Although I may be able to remedy the situation, meanwhile what kind of breakfast I can have, readily available in the market.Secondly, what the maximum number of almonds I can have in breakfast, and then during the day. What are other energy boosters for the breakfast and during the day (something readily available from the market).Regards,Best Wishes,Rajinder K
Answer : Dear Rajinder, A busy professional like you needs to take extra care of his diet especially as you need to eat away from home. Eating out for you has become more of a compulsion than an enjoyable treat. Most choices on the menu are very far from good nutrition and the chances of stomach infections is high; yet, it is possible to eat healthy outside your home. Follow these simple rules and you can make eating out a healthy affair. Select the food joint with care Avoid dhabas and small eateries. The oil used here is usually poor quality and they tend to add large amounts of it. Chances of infection are also high. Bigger eating joints serve a wider variety of foods - both vegetarian and non-vegetarian - so that it is possible to select nutritionally sound foods. They are also more clean and hygienic. Ready-to-eat foods Do not go in for the ready-to-heat & eat curries (paneer/palak paneer/chicken/fish/rajmah/etc) and paranthas available in the market today. These are simply loaded with salt and harmful fats. Totally Avoid!!! Don't skip meals Eat 3 main meals regularly. Make sure you do not skip breakfast or lunch since this can make you so ravenous that you will end up eating whatever you can lay your hands on. For example, if you miss lunch, you will be tempted to eat chips/fried snacks around 6. Making the menu selection Avoid buffets since they promote overeating. In India, curries are usually steeped in oil. Avoid gravies and fried items. Go in for dishes that are steamed, tandoori/roasted or stir-fried. Even when ordering chicken tikka, most chefs add a few tablespoons of oil to 'flavor' the tikka - be sure to ask that it be prepared in a "low fat" way. When ordering dal, avoid the tadka totally. Always order a tossed greens salad or a vegetable soup before dinner. But stay clear of salads with creamy dressings usually served in fancy restaurants. Restaurants usually add a lot of oil in steaming the dosa - opt for idlis instead. Or try eating tandoori roti every alternate day. Eat limited amounts of coconut chutney - it is high in fat. Order desserts made from fresh fruit. If you must eat your favorite dessert, eat only half the portion. If you must eat your favorite dessert, eat only half the portion served or split with others. Eat slightly less at dinner and enjoy a healthy glass of toned milk just before you go to bed. Try having breakfast at home Give breakfast a shot at home. An egg is a better and healthier option for breakfast along with a glass of milk, some fruit and toast. Restrict the amount of butter and cheese on the toast. Or if someone can make you a couple of stuffed (paneer/dal/green leafy vegetables) paranthas, you can even carry them to the staff bus! Please try to eat at least breakfast at home. Control portion size Portion sizes at restaurants are usually double or triple what a person would normally eat. If possible, order "half sizes". Otherwise, eat only one-third to one-half of the meal and take the rest home for the next day. Keep healthy snacks around While you don't cook at home, you can always keep a supply of healthy snacks at home and at work. Buy high fiber fruits such as apples, pears, guavas. When hungry, simply eat a fruit. Keep roasted chanas and nuts around - pop in a few when you feel like it. Do not be tempted by the fried samosas, bread pakoras and vadas that usually do the rounds in offices. Do not give in to bingeing on biscuits - they are loaded with harmful fats. Nuts are a powerhouse of nutrients and great energy boosters. They are ideal snacks. Keep the nut box handy in the office drawer or briefcase. Have only about a handful of nuts - 10-12 almonds/pistachios/peanuts/walnuts - every day. Watch the beverages -sodas, coffee and alcohol We usually do not realize the number of sodas and coffees we drink at work. All are loaded with harmful sugar. Restrict your coffee/soda/tea intake to 2 cups during the day. If you drink, remember that alcohol is calorie-dense. Drink in moderation (3-4 drinks a week) and choose light beer or wine over whisky. Drink lots of water Drink 10-12 glasses of bottled water at hourly intervals throughout the day. This will keep refreshed all day and also keep the hunger at bay. Be physically fit Take up some exercise which you do consistently and regularly throughout life. Walk for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a day. You can jog, cycle, swim or play a game of badminton/tennis/squash or join a gym. Or if you are fun-loving, enroll in a salsa/aerobic dancing class in your area. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: yuvraj
i am a 20 years old boy. i wanna ask the best possible nutrition diet for a man who is vegetarien and doing a lot of workouts. i m not taking any supplements.
Answer : Dear Yuvraj, A young man like you needs a healthy diet which provides all the required nutrients - carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, fiber and water - in the required amounts. You need about 2500 calories and 60 g proteins spread over all the food groups in the following proportion: Cereals - 10 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd/custard/ice cream) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one medium potato/ 3 arbis/ 1 small sweet potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Make sure that you distribute these exchanges evenly over the day. Usually, breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three major meals; in addition, a couple of small snacks in-between meals keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each exchange. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. Also, you should eat well after a workout (wait for about half an hour to cool down). Since you work out a lot, there is no harm if you include a protein supplement on a daily basis. Try out one of the various protein powders available at health stores today - you may enjoy adding a tablespoon full to your milk. Also, check with your doctor if some nutritional supplements (vitamins B-complex, C or E) are required. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: A
WHAT FOOD SHOULD I TAKE TO GET RELIEF FROM ARTHRITISESPECIALLY KNEE PAIN ETC.,
Answer : Dear Reddy, There are many different forms of arthritis, each of which has a different cause. Have you consulted a doctor? What type of arthritis has he diagnosed? Since treatment options vary with the type of arthritis, perhaps you write back to me with the type of arthritis you have. I can then prescribe the appropriate dietary measures for your knee pain. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Krish
Madam,Is coffee drinking beneficial or harmful?
Answer : Dear Kris, Yes and No. By and large, caffeine - the stimulant found in coffee as well as tea, colas, chocolate - is considered safe. Caffeine counters physical fatigue, enhances mood and increases alertness. It also relieves pain, prevents migraine and reduces asthma symptoms. Fears that caffeine is linked with higher rates of cancer (kidney, pancreatic and urinary bladder), fibrocystic breast disease and osteoporosis, have not been proved. In fact, a 30-year study with 8000 Japanese-American men found caffeine might combat Parkinson's disease. However, excessive amounts of caffeine do increase anxiety, upset the stomach and keep you awake. Drinking too many caffeinated soft drinks may prevent adolescents from getting a good night's sleep. World consensus is that caffeine is not dangerous at moderate levels of consumption. A moderate amount of caffeine per day - 300 mgs equivalent to about 3-4 small cups of coffee or 6-8 cans of colas - is relatively harmless including pregnant women. If your caffeine intake is higher than 300 mg, try reducing it: . Drink half a cup of tea/coffee less in a day. . Mix decaffeinated coffee half and half with regular coffee. . Have a café latté with lots of milk instead of coffee. . Try herbal teas instead of regular teas or brew regular tea for shorter amounts of time. . Read food, drink and medication labels to check for caffeine content. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Suman
Dear Madam, My name is Suman, 26 years, Female, unmarried, living with parents .Wt 44 kgs, Height: 4ft 11InchesHistory : A year ago I weighed 48 kgs. I had to leave my job due work pressure perhapsresultant gastro problems (acidity-constipation-haemoroids. After detailed investigations by two specialists GE, found nothing wrong except haemoroids(Piles). During the process oftreatments and living on fruit juices and vegetable juices , I lost some weight. GE advised me to take Bcomplex, Supradyn Multivitamins and folic. When I take these tabs, my acidity increases and I discontinued but I am still continuing multivitamins cold liver oil tablets. Present. My haemoglobin has improved from 10.2 10 11.6 but I wish to rise it to 12 I have a lower BP at 90/70. I am now vegetarian. Food mainly fruits, salads and leafy vegetables, beans rice. I do yoga meditation.Constipation, piles, acidity problems continue and I am not confident to take up another job. I am fine with my present weight.This consultation is to request advice and a diet plan to address my present problem in order to lead a normal life.Best regards,Suman
Answer : Dear Suman, You are right. Your main problem is the piles. Your weight for height is just fine. Your hemoglobin is also on the increase. Combined with a balanced diet and adequate supplements, I am sure you will be fine soon. Continue with your vitamins and cod liver oil tablets as well as yoga and meditation. The main cause of piles is chronic constipation. When one strains to evacuate constipated bowels, the pressure caused on the surrounding veins leads to piles. Treating chronic constipation is the only way to get rid of the trouble. First of all, you need to eat a high fiber diet which will keep the stool large, soft, bulky which passes out easily and quickly. This will also take care of your acidity problem. Its good that you are a vegetarian. All plant foods esp. fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and pulses are great sources of fiber. Include lots of them in your diet everyday. . Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges, pears and pomegranates are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - instead eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. . Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. . Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are rich in fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Using laxatives to relieve constipation makes the bowels dependent upon them. Do not use laxatives at all. Instead, add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. You may try soaking 10-15 black raisins (monacca) or 3-4 figs in warm water at night and eating them in the morning along with the water. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. Most importantly, stop worrying. Join a job again. You are normal - lead a normal life. A busy schedule will bring in more confidence and a sense of personal achievement. Go ahead and take charge of your life once again! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: NITTA
i would like to reduce mywait ,now iam 88kg,can u tellme some diet controls .
Answer : Dear Nitta, Since you have not mentioned your height, it is difficult to say how much weight you exactly need to lose. Since the ideal weight for a person who is 5 feet tall is about 50 kgs and a 5 feet 10 inch tall person is about 70 kgs, irrespective of your height, you could do with losing about 15-20 kgs. You could consult a weight management consultant in your area who will analyze your weight, height, body composition, food consumption and lifestyle and then suggest suitable modifications in your eating and activity patterns. Till then, these tips will help you in taking stock of the situation and hopefully, correcting it too: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: kenni
hi, i'm 25 yrs of age 5 ft 8 inchs tall. my weight is 74.5kgs. plz suggest me a diet to reduce my weight. i am a non vegitarian. can i increase my height further.as i'm desperate to increase my height by abt 2-3 inches more.how can i achieve my desired height?. plz reply .thankyou!!
Answer : Dear Kenni, At the moment, your BMI (or Body Mass Index or weight for height ratio) is 24.9 which borders the upper limit of the normal range: 18.5 - 24.9. You should bring down your weight slightly so that you come comfortably inside this range. Losing about 5 kgs will bring your BMI down to 23.5 which will be good for you. Now, you don't need to diet to bring this about. The first step before losing weight is to eat healthily. For this, follow these simple tips and see the difference: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. As far as increasing height is concerned, men usually grow till the age of 25. You may add on an inch or so in this year. Eating a balanced diet with lots of protein (meat, chicken, fish, eggs, milk & milk products, pulses esp. soybean, nuts and grains) and calcium (milk and preferably, a calcium supplement) will definitely help. You may also check out the website http://www.giantscientific.com/ for good information on increasing height. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: maya
hi am 16. and i weight only 42 kg. what shuld i do to gain weight.
Answer : Dear Maya, What is your height? And why are you worried about gaining weight? A weight of 42 kg is quite fine although I cannot really comment since I don't know your height. Being slightly under-weight should not be a problem (in any case, there will be times in life when you will gain weight when you least want it to). Do get back to me with your height and then we will discuss this in detail. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: salini
Dear Madam I have 2 childern.elder one is 9 year old boy and younger one is 7 year old boy. they are not eating vegetables. They like only nonveg. They drink only 1 glass of milk everyday is it ok for them. please send a reply
Answer : Dear Salini, What to do? As a mother, I face this problem at every mealtime. Whatever people may say, it is difficult to make children eat what is good for them. Our children are now used to special treats from McDonalds, Pizza Hut and whatnot. At home, they like non-vegetarian only . but there is a way out. Try this gradually: . No non-vegetarian food for lunch. If they don't eat the lunch prepared by you, let them go hungry. Whenever they are hungry (even at seven in the evening), give them the same lunch. Even if they eat half a chapati with the dal and veggies, they will get the message. Next day will be better. . Serve a small portion of vegetables before the non-vegetarian dish. Let them finish the veggies with half the roti, then give them the non-veg. Be firm. . Add vegetables to their favorite dishes. I usually add lots of beans, carrots etc to dal; pureed spinach to chicken; methi/spinach to the chapati dough/mathis; mint to the curd; vegetables to omelettes; pizza topped with spinach, corn etc; mashed vegetables to their favorite rolls and so on. . Make a deal with them. If they eat your homemade meals faithfully for the entire week, you will make them a special treat of their favorite dishes or will treat them at their favorite restaurant. . Become a role model for the children. Start eating more vegetables yourself and discuss their benefits without putting pressure on them. . Give them lots of fruits - they are also rich in the protective vitamins and minerals. . Don't force feed. Children will eat only what they like - until they are older, they rarely eat by reason. Don't worry, things will sort out soon. If your children drink only one glass of milk a day, it is fine. Try giving them milk in other forms - cheese (with crackers), milkshakes, lassi, custards, porridge, kheer, khoya mithai and so on. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sreekala
My son is 5 and half years old.But he is very lean and not eating anything.What food we have to give him(means less food more nutritious.)Waiting for your valuable advice.
Answer : Dear Sreekala, After the dramatic changes taking place after birth, growth during childhood is considerably slower. Weight increases an average of 2-3 kg per year until the child is 9 or 10 years old. Height increments average 6-8 cm per year. This is probably why your son is lean and not hungry. Yes, you are right: He needs to be given foods which are nutrient-dense and provide him enough energy, proteins, vitamins and minerals since their deficiency in the growing years has long term consequences on physical and mental development. At the same time, we need to make sure that he develops healthy eating habits as well as an active lifestyle because habits established now will be carried through to adulthood. I am giving you an approximate idea about the amounts of different food groups that he should be eating during the day: Cereals - 7 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg). If vegetarian, substitute meat exchange with 1 exchange of pulse or milk Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange ((1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Green leafy vegetables - ½ exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - ½ exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/ orange/ pear/half a banana) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) . Since he eats small quantities of food, give him small meals 6-7 times a day. Give him 2 tablespoons of food at one time; serve more only if he wants it. Add small amounts of fats/oils/nuts which enrich the food without making it bulky. . Get him to enjoy food combos: milk with biscuits; chole with bhatura; pizza topped with vegetables; aloo-puri; chicken-roti; aloo parantha and lassi; rajmah-chawal; chicken soup with toast; halwa-chana and so on. . Combine different food groups instead of giving each one separately: for e.g.: add some fruit to his porridge; mashed vegetables to his dal; pureed spinach to chicken curry; nuts to his cereal . you get the idea. . Do not force-feed the child. Continue to offer a variety of foods including the child's favorite foods. . Present the food well. Humor food quirks such as not eating foods that touch each other on the plate, mixed dishes, broken biscuits or a wrongly cut sandwich. . Serve food at the table at all times. The height of the chair and table should be age-appropriate. Bowls, plates and cups should be unbreakable and heavy enough to resist tipping. Thick, short handled spoons and forks allow for easier less tiring grasp. . Stick to a regular feeding schedule every day with a meal every 3 hours. Schedule a quiet activity or rest before the meal so that the child is relaxed and can enjoy the meal. Do not give any food or drink within one and a half hours of a meal. Don't worry too much. As one of my daughter's pediatrician once said: Have you ever seen a kid starving himself to death? And I soon realized that children eat better when we are not anxious about feeding them. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Bindu
Dear Mam,i am 21 year old indian studying in K.S.A.my weight is 70 and hight is 155cm. please suggest me the best diet to lose and control my weight.kindly respond to my Qs.
Answer : Dear Bindu, Please bear with me. Your answer is in the pipeline. Give me a few days please. Meeta
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Question by: Santhanu
I am 41 years old and recently detected with fatty liver on an ultra scan. Doctor advised me no need of medication for this desease, control the diet and do regular excersise.What should be the best diet you can advice to me?
Answer : Dear Santhanu, First of all, my apologies for the delay in answering your query. A common problem today, fatty liver literally means a liver with large droplets of fat in its cells and other spaces. The liver becomes slightly enlarged and heavier and may go unnoticed for a long period of time. In severe cases, the liver may enlarge over three times its normal size and is painful and tender. Fatty liver is not harmful in itself; once diagnosed, the condition can be reversed. However, left untreated, it can contribute to other illnesses with dire consequences for your health and longevity. One thing is certain: The eating of fatty foods, by itself, does not produce a fatty liver. Rather, fatty liver is usually associated with middle age, overweight or obesity, diabetes and high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Insulin resistance - or the body's inability to utilize the sugar absorbed from food - is the most important trigger of fatty liver. Rapid weight loss measures which cause loss of more than 1-2 pounds per week - dieting, gastric bypass surgery - increase the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; so does excess alcohol consumption (3 or more drinks for men) and prolonged treatment with oral steroids and other hormones. Treatment involves correcting the condition that caused fatty liver and providing supportive care. While research is underway to develop more specific treatments, weight loss, exercise, improved diabetes control and the use of cholesterol-lowering medications is the prescribed line of action. Since you have not mentioned any additional problems, I assume you do not have any of these conditions. If yes, then your diet will need to take care of these at the same time. Thankfully the liver is one of the most resilient organs in the body. It is capable of much self healing if given a chance. With a proper diet and plenty of exercise, the liver recovers and functions normally but this may take some months. 1. Eat a healthy, well balanced diet. . Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Eat a diet rich in fiber-rich foods - whole wheat flour/bread/pasta; pulses (with chilka), green leafy vegetables, other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, cauliflower, beans etc; and fruits with skin and pulp such as berries, pomegranates, guava, figs, prunes and black raisins. . Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids such as fatty fish, fish oils, flax and flaxseed oils, and walnuts. 2. Lose weight if you are overweight or obese. If your Body Mass Index (BMI is a measure of weight for height and is calculated as weight (kg) divided by height (in meters) and again divided by height (in meters). If your BMI is above 25, losing weight will definitely reduce the accumulated fat in your liver. Even if you are not overweight, weight loss may reduce inflammation, lower elevated levels of liver enzymes and decrease insulin resistance. 3. Exercise regularly. I always recommend walking for 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week as ideal exercise which you can follow forever. You may also like to include some yoga - for 20-30 minutes 2-3 times a week. Or take some strength training (exercising with weights). 4. Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. 5. If you are diabetic, strict management with diet, medications or insulin will reduce the accumulated fat in your liver and also prevent further damage. 6. If your cholesterol and triglycerides levels are high, the recommended healthy diet and exercise may help stabilize or reverse fatty liver. Your doctor may prescribe some cholesterol-reducing medicines. 7. Drinking plenty of water - at least 10-12 glasses daily - throughout the day. 8. Raw vegetable juices also help in detoxifying the liver 9. Check with your doctor about nutritional supplements such as vitamins E and C, milk thistle abstract, etc With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nisha
Hi Mam, I am Nisha again. Just saw in your response that you will be replying to my query shortly. Thanks in advance. My question was regarding having honey and cinnamon mix. I had accidently mentioned it as coriander instead of cinnamon. Apologize for that.I am 154cm weighing 49kg.
Answer : Dear Nisha, There is no harm in following either of these measures. In fact, both honey and cinnamon are considered 'Super Foods". Honey, a great source of simple sugars, minerals and vitamins, provides ready fuel to the brain and quick energy to the tired body. In general, honey aids in digestion. It stimulates appetite, lessens stomach ache and relieves constipation. Honey has been proved to have a definite anti-microbial action against dental caries, diarrhea and dysentery. It also relieves insomnia and lowers blood pressure, prevents osteoporosis, promotes fertility and protects against cancer. Cinnamon, a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium, has been proved to lower LDL (or the bad) cholesterol and regulate blood sugar. In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month. Cinnamon inhibits yeast and bacterial growth. It also boosts cognitive function and memory. So, go ahead, have honey (about a teaspoon) with cinnamon in luke warm water morning and evening. As far as water therapy is concerned, alternative medicine advocates the use of water "cleanse the bowel". Water Therapy is claimed to have a wide range of health benefits; or at least no adverse effects. So, try it out. You may like to consult a yoga expert as to the correct technique. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: vani
age 15yrs weight 53kgs height 163cm femalesuggest me a diet to grow taller i have difficulty in passing my stools and irregular periods. i even have pimples although i eat healthy veg food and drink lot of water i also tend to overeat homemade food
Answer : Dear Vani, Your weight for height ratio is very good. Do maintain it esp. since it is very easy to put on weight at this age. Don't worry about your height. There is plenty of time for you to grow tall - girls add on height till the age of 21 years. In addition, our diet and environment also contribute significantly. Eat a balanced diet with lots of protein (meat, chicken, fish, eggs, milk & milk products, pulses esp. soybean, nuts and grains) and calcium (milk and preferably, a calcium supplement). You may also check out the website http://www.giantscientific.com/ for good information on increasing height. You probably have constipation and that is why you have difficulty in passing stools. Do not be tempted to use laxatives to relieve constipation since this makes the bowels laxative-dependent. Do not use laxatives at all. The key to relieving constipation lies in eating high fiber foods. A high-fiber diet causes a large, soft, bulky stool that passes through the bowel more easily and quickly. So eat plenty of: Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges, pears and pomegranates are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . You may also like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. Pimples are common at your age. They may also be related to your diet and constipation. A number of home remedies are recommended: rubbing cucumber juice and lemon on the face; using a neem face mask and powdered cinnamon and so on. Try these out and see if they help. Homeopathy does seem to relieve pimples. Also, at your age, periods are still irregular; they take a few months to stabilize. Sometimes iron deficiency also leads to infrequent and/or heavy periods. Do consult a gynecologist - she will check you up and perhaps, prescribe some good iron supplements. Try not to overeat. For this: . Eat in a smaller plate . Stop before you are full . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Why am I eating this? Am I really hungry? Or am I just eating it because I don't have anything else to do? . Don't take second or third portions. Serve yourself from the kitchen. Or change your seat at the table such that serving dishes are out of reach. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Eat three main meals and snack a couple of times in-between. . Do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Snacking keeps the hunger from getting out of control. Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. Try these tips out. I am sure they will help you. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Lisa
I am 45 yrs old and my height is 155 cm (5.2")and my weight is 70 Kg. i am trying to reduce my weight, but not reducing. I am started walking for 45 min daily. What diet should I take every day. I cholestrol level also heigh. Can you reply to me. If I am not reducing any requirement to check Thyroid or any other checkings. Thanks
Answer : Dear Lisa, Your health consciousness at this age is good. You have already started walking for 45 minutes - this is even better. Try and add on some stretch exercises - yoga is best - for about 15-20 minutes 3 times a week. I also recommend 10 minutes of strength training (simple exercises with weights) 3-4 times a week. You can check with a personal trainer or refer to books/magazines and do these exercises while watching TV. Now, for your weight loss. Despite being weight conscious and doing regular exercise, most of us don't lose weight because many important healthy eating habits are not a part of our routine. Try the following: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. My guess is that once you incorporate healthy eating habits, you will automatically reduce your caloric intake which will slowly, but surely, bring about weight loss. Now for your high cholesterol: The first step in lowering blood cholesterol is to forego cholesterol-rich foods. At the same time, you need to forego foods containing saturated fat or trans fat - since these fats raise cholesterol levels higher much more than cholesterol-rich foods. So, you need to eliminate or at least drastically limit foods that contain saturated fats, trans fats and cholesterol. Avoid: . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Leena
Thank you very much for your valuable pointers. However, Doctor has adviced for a surgery during the third week of November. After the surgery(breast Removal), four chemos are to taken.
Answer : Dear Leena, Go ahead with your surgery with faith and love. All the very best ... Do let me know if I can be of any help With warm wishes Meeta
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Question by: Kutty
Dear Dr.I am staying in Dubai.I am having 1 kg. beef daily.is it less or more.
Answer : Dear Kutty, My apologies for the delay in answering your question. Beef, along with the meat of goat, lamb, sheep and pig belongs to the category of red meat. Red meat is a great source of protein and energy; however, it is equally rich in fats especially the harmful saturated fats which lead to diabetes, obesity, cancer esp. colon cancer, hypertension, high cholesterol levels and heart disease. On the other hand, the category of white meat includes poultry (chicken, goose, turkey, and duck) and fish. Animal fat should thus be within limits. So I would advise that you switch from beef to chicken (and fish, if possible) entirely. If you must eat beef, restrict your intake to about 100 - 150 g beef per day. This will be about the size of your two palms. Also, certain cuts of beef are less fatty. Cuts from the hip, such as round steak/roasts and sirloin tip are usually the leanest choices and contain only 10 - 17% fat as against the regular 30%. If you eat beef in the ground form, then make sure that the beef is lean/extra lean. In fact, lean beef is an important source of 14 essential nutrients including high quality protein, iron, zinc, and B vitamins and can easily be part of heart healthy eating. Also, go in for beef dishes that use low-fat cooking methods such as broiling, roasting, and stir frying or grilling. Studies show that even if you have been eating large amounts of red meat your entire life, changing your eating pattern now can have a positive effect within a few years. In addition, add a lot of whole grains, vegetables, fruits and pulses/beans to your diet. They will add health-promoting nutrients and provide satisfaction without burdening your system with nutrient-dense meat esp. red meat. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pankaj
m'ami m 21 yrs old and ht5 ft 5 in ,wt 60kg, my query is that i want to increase my weight and personlity as i m getting into the corporate world next year. i will be obliged 2 u
Answer : Dear Pankaj, Your weight for height ratio is perfect. in fact, you are your ideal weight of 60 kg which is usually very difficult to achieve for most people. I dont see any reason why you need to put on weight. However, i would like to suggest that you should take up some vigorous activity at this stage in life. it will help you deal with the physical, emotional and social stress of working in the corporate world. if you like, you can join a gym and combine cardio exercises (cycling, treadmill, rowing, stepping) for 20 minutes with strength training for another 20 minutes thrice a week. or simply start walking briskly 40 minutes 4-5 times a week and combine this with the sport of your choice - swimming, tennis, squash, anything. this will improve your physique and posture. all the best for your corporate career. With best wishes, Meeta
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Question by: K.
Dear Meeta,I am suffering from severe hair fall, in fact, evry time I comb, hair is coming off in bunches. My once thick and long hair has become very thin.Please tell me what can I do to reduce hair fall.Regards,Sailaja
Answer : Dear Sailaja, Don't worry, you're not alone. It is perfectly normal to lose some strands of hair everyday; about 80-100 strands a day is normal. Excessive hair loss may happen due to a poor diet or excessive dieting, tension, too much work, illness, over-exposure to the sun or frequent coloring/perming/bleaching/rinsing with chemicals. Hair loss also increases before and during menopause. How old are you? Since hair is primarily protein, you need to eat lots of good quality protein (eggs, milk and meat, especially fish; if vegetarian, milk and pulses are excellent) and plenty of green leafy vegetables and fresh fruits. Iron supplements (Fefol Z, Fesovit, etc) also help; check with your doctor. Give up junk food ¡V it is full of refined carbohydrates (maida, corn flour, etc) and fats. In fact, the traditional Indian diet combining roti (made from whole wheat flour which is preferably stone ground), pulses, curds and vegetables is ideal for health and of course, hair. Drinking 10-12 glasses of water a day also helps. Exercise regularly. This will also relieve stress and improve blood circulation. Remember, to prevent hair fall, the scalp needs to be kept clean. Use a mild shampoo and condition your hair at least twice a week. Alternate with an anti-dandruff and regular shampoo. Rinse out the conditioner thoroughly to prevent residue build-up which makes hair look limp and dull. There are a number of other haircare measures which will reduce your hair fall: "X Massage your scalp with oil (almond/ almond + castor oil/ olive oil/ coconut oil) at least once a week. Wrap a hot towel around your scalp so the oil gets absorbed into the hair. "X Grind fenugreek seeds in water and apply on your scalp. Wash off after 40 minutes. "X Curd and eggs are great conditioners. Whip them up together (with some oil) and apply to hair half an hour before a wash, and shampoo off with room temperature water. Henna, too, is a good conditioner but it makes hair brittle and easily breakable in the long run after prolonged use. "X Don't brush or comb hair when wet, as it will break. First, remove the tangles from the ends of your hair, and then comb your hair from the entire length. "X Only use rubberbands wrapped in cloth, like scrunchies, in your hair. Try these suggestions for a month or so. if the problem continues, please consult a doctor too. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: johnson
I have problem of hair loss, is that due to lack of nutrition? if so waht food should i take regardsjohnson
Answer : Dear Johnson, Don't worry, you're not alone. It is perfectly normal to lose some strands of hair everyday; about 80-100 strands a day is normal. Yes, excessive hair loss may happen due to a poor diet or excessive dieting. Other reasons could be tension, too much work, illness, over-exposure to the sun or frequent coloring. Since hair is primarily protein, you need to eat lots of good quality protein (eggs, milk and meat, especially fish; if vegetarian, milk and pulses are excellent) and plenty of green leafy vegetables and fresh fruits. Iron supplements (Fefol Z, Fesovit, etc) also help; check with your doctor. Give up junk food ¡V it is full of refined carbohydrates (maida, cornflour, etc) and fats. In fact, the traditional Indian diet combining roti (made from whole wheat flour which is preferably stone ground), pulses, curds and vegetables is ideal for health and of course, hair. Drinking 10-12 glasses of water a day also helps. Exercise regularly. This will also relieve stress and improve blood circulation. Remember, to prevent hair fall, the scalp needs to be kept clean. Use a mild shampoo and condition your hair at least twice a week. Alternate with an anti-dandruff and regular shampoo. Rinse out the conditioner thoroughly to prevent residue build-up which makes hair look limp and dull. There are a number of other haircare measures which will reduce your hair fall: "X Massage your scalp with oil (almond/ almond + castor oil/ olive oil/ coconut oil) at least once a week. Wrap a hot towel around your scalp so the oil gets absorbed into the hair. "X Grind fenugreek seeds in water and apply on your scalp. Wash off after 40 minutes. "X Curd and eggs are great conditioners. Whip them up together (with some oil) and apply to hair half an hour before a wash, and shampoo off with room temperature water. Henna, too, is a good conditioner but it makes hair brittle and easily breakable in the long run after prolonged use. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: avtar
i am a male, 32 yrs of age., wt 62 kg, ht 169 cm. can you plaese suggest me a balanced diet chart for one day atleast . what should i eat in the morning, afternoon and night?
Answer : Dear Avatar, At the moment, your weight for height ratio is perfect. I genuinely appreciate your concern for fitness at this age since this will ensure good health for you in later years. Assuming that your activity level is sedentary, your calorie requirements are about 2400 calories and 60 g protein per day. To ensure that your requirements for all nutrients - calories, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and fiber - are met, you need to eat foods from all food groups - cereals, pulses, milk, green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, fruits and fats every day. This forms the basis of a balanced diet. I am specifying the approximate amounts of various food groups that you need to consume every day. You will note that the amounts are given in terms of exchanges. For example, the cereal exchange includes all foods from grains including chapatis, bread, rice, idli, dosa, poha, upma, cornflakes, biscuits, etc. All foods within an exchange provide more or less the same amount of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. This means that you can interchange foods within an exchange for variety. For example, for breakfast, you may have poha one day, a sandwich the next day and so on . Cereals - 10 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice/ 1 large idli) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one medium potato/ 3 arbis/ 1 small sweet potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/ orange/ pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon oil/fat or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Make sure that you distribute these exchanges evenly over the day. Usually, breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three major meals; in addition, small snacks a couple of times in between meals keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each exchange. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. A sample menu for you could be: Early morning: tea with a couple of biscuits Breakfast: Brown bread sandwich; omelette; sautéed vegetables (paneer/ beans/ capsicum/ carrot etc); cold coffee Mid-morning: Potato salad (corn/cucumber/capsicum/tomato); banana or apple; few nuts Lunch: Chapatis; arhar dal with spinach; aloo-gobhi sabzi; cucumber raita Tea/Before dinner: Paneer tikka with onion and capsicum and Dhokla; tea Dinner: Chapatis; chicken curry; mixed vegetables; fresh fruit with jelly After dinner: Glass of milk with a biscuit Do write back for any clarifications. With best wishes, Meeta Lall Reply sent on 1 November 2007
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Question by: Johnson
I want to reduce my weight. Now I am more than 73 kgs. my present height is 163 cms. Kindly advise as to what to eat and what to do
Answer : Dear Daniel, For your height, your weight is definitely on the higher side. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index, a measure of weight for height) is 27.5 which falls in the overweight range (normal = 18.5 - 24.9; overweight = 25.0 - 29.9). While it is usually difficult and not really desirable to achieve ideal weight (in your case, 58 kgs), you do need to lose about 10 kgs. This will bring your BMI down to 23.7. Now, what do you need to do? First, you need to understand that: . Our weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . Any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? Next, don't worry about weight loss immediately. You first need to make healthy eating habits a part of your routine. Eating healthily - without worrying about food quantities usually prescribed in a weight loss diet - will in itself result in weight loss. Once you can say that you eat healthily, we can work out a specific weight-reducing diet for you based on your age, weight, height and lifestyle. Some basic healthy eating habits include: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Adopt these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply joining a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nitha
How to reduce belly fat
Answer : Dear Nitha, Belly fat is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. Fat on the middle is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. For women, a waist circumference greater than 35 inches is definitely a high risk factor. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. As a first step, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30-40 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) for 15 minutes a couple of times in a week. Strength training is particularly good since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will begin to lose belly fat and become more proportionate. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sasi
sir I am 32 yrs,76kg and 176cm long.compared to my other body parts my thighs,hips and waist are heavy as wil as fleshy,my hands and lower legs are lean. please tell me what is the reason and what foods i have to avoid?
Answer : Dear Sasi, Your BMI is 24.3. The BMI (or Body Mass Index) is a measure of weight for height; the normal range being 18.5 - 24.9. While you are within the normal range, it is towards the higher side. Combined with the fact that you have fleshy thighs, hips and waist, it is likely that you may soon become overweight (BMI > 24.9). You need to take care of this right now. Actually, fat on the waist, hips and thighs is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. Fat on the middle is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. For men, a waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor. So, your concern is well-timed. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30-40 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) for 15 minutes a couple of times in a week. Strength training is particularly good since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will not only lose weight but become more proportionate. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: abraham
Dear Madam, i want to reduce my belly size to flat. What is the effective step to reduce. I am 50 yr old man. No diabetic but little pressure. What is the best diet and exercise you are recommending? Thanks and regardsMathew
Answer : Dear Mathew, I do not know your weight or height. But your concern for belly size and willingness to reduce it will ensure your health in the long run. Fat on the belly is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. For men, a waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30-40 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) for 15 minutes a couple of times in a week. Strength training is particularly good since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. For your high blood pressure, I suggest that you: . Reduce the amount salt added in cooking. For flavor, use herbs and spices like lemon juice, coriander, raw mango, tomatoes, garlic and oregano. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces (soy sauce, tomato sauce, mustard, Tabasco, chilli sauce, etc) along with meals. . Avoid high-salt savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Avoid fast foods and restaurant food. . Avoid processed foods like cornflakes, bread, cheese, salted butter, biscuits, cookies, cakes, ready-to-cook vegetables/soups, canned vegetables/fruits, salad dressings and packaged fruit juices/drinks. Colas are high in sodium - avoid. . Antacids are high in sodium, do not take them. . Read labels to figure out the amount of sodium added in the form of baking powder, baking soda and preservatives like brine, sodium benzoate, monosodium glutamate or ajinomoto, sodium benzoate, etc. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: fahadnenu
im male 26,married, professional travel consultant. my problem is my great stomach, my hight 6 feet, weight is 76 ,pls give me instructions or if any medicins
Answer : Dear Fahadnenu, Your weight for height is perfect. Concern for fitness should begin at a young age - this will ensure your good health in the long run. Fat on the belly is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. For men, a waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anil
I am 34 years old and a pure vegetarian. Please provide me a diet chart for the entire week.
Answer : Dear Anil, I assume that your activity level is sedentary. As per Indian standards, your calorie requirements are about 2400 calories and 60 g protein per day. To ensure that your requirements for all nutrients - calories, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and fiber - are met, you need to eat foods from all food groups - cereals, pulses, milk, green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, fruits and fats every day. This forms the basis of a balanced diet. I am specifying the approximate amounts of various food groups that you need to consume every day. You will note that the amounts are given in terms of exchanges. For example, the cereal exchange includes all foods from grains including chapatis, bread, rice, idli, dosa, poha, upma, cornflakes, biscuits, etc. All foods within an exchange provide more or less the same amount of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. This means that you can interchange foods within an exchange for variety. For example, for breakfast, you may have poha one day, a sandwich the next day and so on . Cereals - 10 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice/ 1 large idli) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one medium potato/ 3 arbis/ 1 small sweet potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/ orange/ pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon oil/fat or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Make sure that you distribute these exchanges evenly over the day. Usually, breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three major meals; in addition, small snacks a couple of times in between meals keep you going through the day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner can provide 1/4th of the requirements for each exchange. The remaining ¼ can be split across the two snacks. Do write back for any clarifications. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nisha
Hi Mam, I am Nisha again. Just saw in your response that you will be replying to my query shortly. Thanks in advance. My question was regarding having honey and cinnamon mix. I had accidently mentioned it as coriander instead of cinnamon. Apologize for that.I am 154cm weighing 49kg.
Answer : Sure Nisha, give me a couple of days - at the most 3-4 days. Meeta
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Question by: R.k.Rastogi
Many a times after eating sweet foods, I feel etching in eyes and sometimes dizziness(poor visibility), specially in the afternoon and evenings.Also protein rich food like pulses and oily foods give etching on legs.Pl advise proper foods And cure.I've completed 46 years of age. My wife(42 Years)ht.5-1",is slightly over weight(70Kg)is having high BP and problem(pain)and movement of left leg(at the top).Pl advise food habits and cure, she is often having headache problem every 2nd week.
Answer : Dear Mr. Rastogi, I feel you to consult a general physician for your problem. It seems that you have an allergy to certain types of foods. Your GP can then refer you to an allergy expert. For your wife, I recommend that she should consult an orthopedic doctor for her leg pain. Such pains should not be taken lightly. As far as her weight and height are concerned, she is overweight by about 10-15 kgs. She will also need to limit her salt (and sugar) intake so that her blood pressure comes under control. Is she on some medication for her BP? Please take her along to the physician who can also investigate her headache problem. For your wife's weight loss, I am suggesting a few healthy eating habits which will put her on the right path. When these habits become a part of her routine, she will realize that some weight loss has already begun. Once this happens, I or a local weight management consultant can work out a detailed diet plan for her. Your wife needs to: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything she eats for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about her food intake. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, she should not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when she is hungry, not when she is bored or because she can't think of anything else to do. . Not overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before she is full. . Before putting anything in her mouth, ask herself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, she should put the food down. . Eat slowly. This will stop her from eating before she becomes overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure her meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Not totally eliminate the foods she loves. She can eat her favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. She should not add sugar to food or drinks. At the same time, your wife should take up some physical exercise which she enjoys. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If she is not able to go to the gym - she needn't worry. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. She could add 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase her activity levels within and outside the house. To restrict her salt intake, she should: . Reduce the amount salt added in cooking. For flavor, use herbs and spices like lemon juice, coriander, raw mango, tomatoes, garlic and oregano. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Not eat pickles and sauces (soy sauce, tomato sauce, mustard, Tabasco, chilli sauce, etc) along with meals. . Avoid high-salt savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Avoid fast foods and restaurant food. . Avoid processed foods like cornflakes, bread, cheese, salted butter, biscuits, cookies, cakes, ready-to-cook vegetables/soups, canned vegetables/fruits, salad dressings and packaged fruit juices/drinks. Colas are high in sodium - avoid. . Antacids are high in sodium, she should not take them. . Read labels to figure out the amount of sodium added in the form of baking powder, baking soda and preservatives like brine, sodium benzoate, monosodium glutamate or ajinomoto, sodium benzoate, etc. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Rajagopal
Dear MadamI have got Gout.I am on Zyloric 100mg on and off.Pls advice me regarding the diet.ThanksRajagopal
Answer : Dear Rajagopal, Gout occurs when the body has a problem in handling uric acid. Let's first understand why uric acid levels go up. When proteins break down in our body, uric acid is produced. Normally, this uric acid is excreted by the kidneys. However, when we eat a large amount of protein-rich foods, the uric acid content of urine increases and the excess uric acid precipitates causing gout or kidney stones. This means that what you eat and drink directly affects your chance of developing gout and/or kidney stones. So you need to: Drink lots and lots of water: Drinking 10-12 glasses of water every day reduce formation of kidney stones and can actually dissolve stones that have already formed. Try drinking one glass of water for every waking hour. Watch your diet: . Limit intake of foods which produce a lot of uric acid in the body. Avoid pulses/beans/peas; red meat (goat/lamb/veal); organ meats (liver, kidney, brain); shellfish (lobster, crayfish, prawns, mussels, oysters, crabs, scallops); fish (anchovies, mackerel, sardines, herring); mushrooms, spinach, and asparagus. . Limit intake of high fat foods like oils/ghee/vanaspati/butter, gravies, whole milk (and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk), cream, ice cream, fried foods and salad dressings. Prefer low-fat dairy products. . Add a low-fat dairy product (in the form of milk, curd, raita, lassi, custard etc) to your meals. This increases the excretion of uric acid in the urine. Drinking lots of water with each meal has the same effect. . Avoid or limit alcohol. If you must drink, space your drinks with a glass of water. . Eat complex carbohydrates - chakki-ground atta, bran, oatmeal - since they help you get rid of extra uric acid. Avoid high fat, refined breads, biscuits, muffins, cakes, doughnuts and pancakes. . Eat fruits such as banana, apples, pears, guava, oranges, fresh cherries, pineapple, strawberries, blueberries, and other red-blue berries . If you are overweight, lose weight - but gradually. Rapid weight loss can increase uric acid levels. Check with your doctor about prescribing bicarbonate of soda or citrate which makes the urine alkaline and thus, helps in excretion of uric acid. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: MANOJ
Madam,Is chickenpox is related to any nutritional defect ?How I can remove scars due to chicken pox ?How long it will take to remove the scars ?
Answer : Dear Manoj, Chicken pox is not related to any nutritional defect. It is a contagious viral disease spread by direct contact or breathing in germs. Spots will start on the chest, back, or face, and eventually all over the body. The spots may occur in the mouth as white ulcers, and as ulcers in the ears and eyes. Crusting of spots occurs within 5-10 days, the crusts do not contain the virus. It is vital not to scratch the spots. Chicken pox rash needs to be tended with care at the time of the illness. Once the scars have been formed, they are more or less permanent. Apply a mixture of lime and cucumber juice to your face and wash off after ten minutes. This is a natural bleach and may help if you do it daily. Applying vitamin E oil on the scars is also believed to reduce them. But if the scars are very prominent, you will need to consider laser resurfacing. For this, do consult a skin specialist or cosmetologist. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: chinni
i have avoided sweets and junk food for 3 months in order to lose weight.it worked.but now,i just cant stop myself from eating them.i try to control myself but i cant.for example,i try to eat just two biscuits but end up eating the whole packet.and soon i feel sad about it.is something wrong with me?how can i control myself?
Answer : Dear Chinni, Yes, avoiding sweets and junk food is great for losing weight. The only problem is that total deprivation only makes the urge to eat these foods stronger. Denial almost always fails and you actually end up eating more than you would normally. So, there is nothing really wrong with you. You just need to go about weight loss in a sensible way. First of all, you need to understand that: . Our weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . Any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well. Being women with great responsibility for home, children and work, we are less likely to devote extra time on taking special measures for ourselves. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? Next, don't worry about weight loss immediately. You first need to make healthy eating habits a part of your routine. Once you achieve this, we can work out a weight-reducing diet for you based on your age, weight, height and lifestyle. Some basic healthy eating habits include: . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies gradually. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Follow the principles of a balanced diet for all meals. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled. Processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. . Keep healthy snacks handy - at home, in the office, in the car: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while but only a small portion. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups/curries/pasta etc. . Limited intake of biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. Only once in a while. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. . Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. . Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. . Reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. Practice these healthy eating habits one by one. On the first day, take up one healthy habit. Practice it throughout the day. The next day, adopt another healthy habit. Continue practicing the first one. The third day, start with the third habit and continue all three on that day. Keep reminding yourself consciously about these habits throughout the day. Over a period of one month, you will be eating more wisely than you ever have. At the same time, from Day 1 on, take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Personally, I think walking is the best and most sustainable form of exercise. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: VIJAY
I am 58yr.weigh 91kg.Ht.171cm. vegiterian.take morning brisk walk for one hr.take bending exercise for waist, my work does not confined me sit at one place.I love food.... I want reduce my weight to 75-78 and waist from 38 to 36 inches. Pl.guide.
Answer : Dear Vijay, I will definitely be getting back to you as soon as possible. Do bear with me. Meeta
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Question by: prakhar
pls suggest me food good for muscles and skindoes working out produces free radicals in body which are harm ful for skin and body
Answer : Dear Prakhar, You have asked me three questions - all three are inter-related. Let me start with the last one: does working out produce free radicals which are harmful? Yes, it does. But before we jump to wrong conclusions, let us first understand the entire mechanism. Free radicals are unstable oxygen atoms. They are considered harmful because they cause oxidation inside the body and damage normal cells and tissues (just like rusting damages iron). To a certain extent, free radicals are a part of being alive ... trouble begins when excess free radicals are produced. This happens when we exercise esp. train with weights excessively. Smoking, direct sunlight, smog and pollution and foods high in fats and sugar also produce excess free radicals. While regular physical exercise does generate free radicals, the body quickly adapts to this: it produces natural anti-oxidants to sop up these free radicals. However, intense exercise in untrained individuals overwhelms this defense system resulting in excess free radicals. Thus, the "weekend warrior" who is sedentary during the week but does vigorous exercise during the weekend may be doing more harm than good. So, don't stop exercising. Just boost your body's defense against free radicals by eating foods loaded with anti-oxidants such as: . Nuts - almonds, walnuts, pistachio nuts, cashew nuts . Vegetable oils esp. olive oil. Use olive oil to stir-fry vegetables, flavor pasta dishes, and dress salads. . Whole grains (esp. wheat germ) . Eggs . Green leafy vegetables . Vegetables like capsicum, green chillies, cabbage, broccoli . Citrus fruits (lemon, orange, grapefruit or chakotra) and fruit juices . Berries - strawberries, raspberries, blue berries, black berries, cranberries, currants and purple grapes . Deep yellow and orange vegetables and fruits - carrots, pumpkin, peaches, yam, sweet potato, papaya, apricots and tomatoes . Soybeans - as milk, beans, flour, nuggets, or tofu - has been found to strengthen hair and stimulate its growth. . Fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters) or fish oil supplements . Flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; . Garlic, turmeric and green tea are also great foods providing anti-oxidants Incorporate as many of these foods in your diet as possible. A team of anti-oxidants working together is more effective than the individual anti-oxidant. At the same time, these anti-oxidants will help your skin pores to stay clear, repair skin and prevent further damage. They anti-oxidants lessen the negative effects of the sun's harsh rays on skin, hair and eyes. Eat at least 5 exchanges of fruits and vegetables preferably in the raw form everyday. For a healthy skin, avoid white foods like potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, and sweets, chocolates, cakes and cookies. Butter, ghee and lard which sustain wrinkles. Also eliminate or cut back on smoking as well as drinking tea/coffee/colas which weaken the body and spoil your appearance. Exercise also requires adequate proteins in the diet for building and repairing muscles. Give your body lots of protein-rich foods such as meat, chicken, fish, eggs, pulses, soy milk, milk, paneer/cheese, yoghurt, seeds and nuts. Fish packs a double punch of protein combined with anti-oxidants. Protein powder drinks in the morning also jumpstart skin and hair repair processes. For vegetarians, combining proteins from different foods improves the quality of the protein. For e.g.: combining rice and dal, milk and dalia/suji/wheat flakes, and corn and beans improves the protein quality considerably. Drinking enough water - 10-12 glasses every day - keeps the skin well-hydrated and washes away all toxic chemicals, pollutants and other impurities from the body. Other tips for fitness lovers 1. Train progressively. Build your fitness level gradually so that the body's defense systems also adjust accordingly. 2. Train with an expert. Use proper exercise technique to avoid tissue inflammation which can be a major source of free radicals. Warm up before workouts and cool down afterward. 3. Flee the smog. Try not to exercise outdoors in smoggy environments. 4. Drink "Antioxidant-ade." Evidence indicates that an acute dose of antioxidants taken immediately before and after workouts can reduce free radicals-linked stress. Most sports are rich in anti-oxidants. 5. Vitamin supplements. Experts suggest taking antioxidant supplements daily notably vitamin E (400 IU) and vitamin C (1000 mg). Do check with your doctor before taking any supplements. I hope I have been able to answer your queries adequately. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: M.SHAILESH
My uric acid level increases now and then , due 2 dat i get pain in d left knee and ankel . Kindly advice me wat 2 eat right and mainly wat food 2 be avoided
Answer : Dear Shailesh, Uric acid levels do show day-to-day and seasonal variations in the same person. The normal range of uric acid is 2.0 - 7.5 mg %. Does your uric acid cross the 7.5 mg % limit? Or does it fall on the higher side of the normal range? In any case, the uric acid level can be easily controlled by certain dietary measures. First, let's understand as to why uric acid levels go up. When proteins break down in our body, uric acid is produced. Normally, this uric acid is excreted by the kidneys. However, when we eat a large amount of protein-rich foods, the uric acid content of urine increases and the excess uric acid precipitates causing kidney stones or gout. This means that what you eat and drink directly affects your chance of developing stone. So you need to: Drink lots and lots of water: Drinking 10-12 glasses of water every day reduce formation of kidney stones and can actually dissolve stones that have already formed. Try drinking one glass of water for every waking hour. Watch your diet: . Limit intake of foods which produce a lot of uric acid in the body. Avoid pulses/beans/peas; red meat (goat/lamb/veal); organ meats (liver, kidney, brain); shellfish (lobster, crayfish, prawns, mussels, oysters, crabs, scallops); fish (anchovies, mackerel, sardines, herring); mushrooms, spinach, and asparagus. . Limit intake of high fat foods like oils/ghee/vanaspati/butter, gravies, whole milk (and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk), cream, ice cream, fried foods and salad dressings. Prefer low-fat dairy products. . Add a low-fat dairy product (in the form of milk, curd, raita, lassi, custard etc) to your meals. This increases the excretion of uric acid in the urine. Drinking lots of water with each meal has the same effect. . Avoid or limit alcohol. If you must drink, space your drinks with a glass of water. . Eat complex carbohydrates - chakki-ground atta, bran, oatmeal - since they help you get rid of extra uric acid. Avoid high fat, refined breads, biscuits, muffins, cakes, doughnuts and pancakes. . Eat fruits such as banana, apples, pears, guava, oranges, fresh cherries, pineapple, strawberries, blueberries, and other red-blue berries . If you are overweight, lose weight - but gradually. Rapid weight loss can increase uric acid levels. Check with your doctor about prescribing bicarbonate of soda or citrate which makes the urine alkaline and thus, helps in excretion of uric acid. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: cherian
I had undergone Radical Nephroctomy due to Renal Cell carcinoma and my present blood analysis shows an elevated reading of uric acid 8.2Creatine is on the boarder and all other results are normal. Pls suggest me a diet and food items to be avoided.
Answer : Dear Cherian, Your blood levels of uric acid are high (normal uric acid: 2.0 - 7.5 mg %). But this can be easily controlled through diet. Let's first understand why uric acid levels go up. When proteins break down in our body, uric acid is produced. Normally, this uric acid is excreted by the kidneys. However, when we eat a large amount of protein-rich foods, the uric acid content of urine increases and the excess uric acid precipitates causing kidney stones or gout. This means that what you eat and drink directly affects your chance of developing kidney stones. So you need to: Drink lots and lots of water: Drinking 10-12 glasses of water every day reduce formation of kidney stones and can actually dissolve stones that have already formed. Try drinking one glass of water for every waking hour. Watch your diet: . Limit intake of foods which produce a lot of uric acid in the body. Avoid pulses/beans/peas; red meat (goat/lamb/veal); organ meats (liver, kidney, brain); shellfish (lobster, crayfish, prawns, mussels, oysters, crabs, scallops); fish (anchovies, mackerel, sardines, herring); mushrooms, spinach, and asparagus. . Limit intake of high fat foods like oils/ghee/vanaspati/butter, gravies, whole milk (and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk), cream, ice cream, fried foods and salad dressings. Prefer low-fat dairy products. . Add a low-fat dairy product (in the form of milk, curd, raita, lassi, custard etc) to your meals. This increases the excretion of uric acid in the urine. Drinking lots of water with each meal has the same effect. . Avoid or limit alcohol. If you must drink, space your drinks with a glass of water. . Eat complex carbohydrates - chakki-ground atta, bran, oatmeal - since they help you get rid of extra uric acid. Avoid high fat, refined breads, biscuits, muffins, cakes, doughnuts and pancakes. . Eat fruits such as banana, apples, pears, guava, oranges, fresh cherries, pineapple, strawberries, blueberries, and other red-blue berries . If you are overweight, lose weight - but gradually. Rapid weight loss can increase uric acid levels. Check with your doctor about prescribing bicarbonate of soda or citrate which makes the urine alkaline and thus, helps in excretion of uric acid. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: chochiko
what is the use of taking queries , if you take 1000 days to reply it. A patient may die, but your answer will not come in the website
Answer : Dear Chochiko, I do not seem to have received any query from you in the past. Can you please repeat it? I will answer back immediately. With best wishes Meeta
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Question by: Nisha
Hi mam, I have read that having honey and coriander mix in luke warm water daily in the morning and night is good for health. Can you please tell me if this would be a good practice? I have also heard that water therapy( having 1.5 liters of water in the morning in empty stomach daily) is very good for the body and its functioning. Is there any harm in following this?
Answer : Dear Nisha, Your question is in the pipeline. Please bear with me ... I will be writing back shortly. Meeta
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Question by: VIJAY
I
Answer :
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Question by: Krish
Madam,Is coffee drinking beneficial or harmful?
Answer : Dear Krish, I will be replying to you shortly. Please bear with me. With best wishes Meeta
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Question by: daisy
please tell me ways to reduce my weight!
Answer : Dear Daisy, I can respond only generally to your question. Let's start at the beginning. Our body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. But both changes need to be done sensibly. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . Any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well. Research shows that a plan which does not consider routine almost always fails. Even if some weight is lost by following special dietary plans, most weight watchers tend to put it back within the one year. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? Some other tips about successful weight loss: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full - yes, even at sumptuous buffets. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: at home, in the office and in the car. Don't hesitate to snack in-between meals. Snacks refuel and keep you going till the next meal. They prevent bingeing at meal times. Low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer are filling and delicious snacks. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates. . Fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - are to be avoided strictly. Don't diet - or start eating less food than what you are used to. This results in hunger. Deprivation makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. Instead, make healthy food choices at every meal. Select brown bread or whole wheat atta chapati instead of white bread, rolls or naan. Go in for lean chicken/fish instead of red meat or organ meats. Select low sugar fruits - guava, berries, etc) instead of banana, mangoes and cheekoo. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. In addition, you need to exercise regularly. I usually recommend a combination of cardiovascular exercise (walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash), strength training (exercising with weights) and stretch exercises (yoga). Try to do the cardiovascular exercise for at least 40 minutes 4-5 times a week; strength training for about 20 minutes 3 times a week and stretch exercises for about 10-15 minutes twice a week. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: kmuralikrishna
what is the best way for reduction of weight?
Answer : Dear Murali, Let's start at the beginning. Our body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. But both changes need to be done sensibly. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . Any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well. Research shows that a plan which does not consider routine almost always fails. Even if some weight is lost by following special dietary plans, most weight watchers tend to put it back within the one year. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? Some other tips about successful weight loss: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full - yes, even at sumptuous buffets. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: at home, in the office and in the car. Don't hesitate to snack in-between meals. Snacks refuel and keep you going till the next meal. They prevent bingeing at meal times. Low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer are filling and delicious snacks. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates. . Fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - are to be avoided strictly. Don't diet - or start eating less food than what you are used to. This results in hunger. Deprivation makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. Instead, make healthy food choices at every meal. Select brown bread or whole wheat atta chapati instead of white bread, rolls or naan. Go in for lean chicken/fish instead of red meat or organ meats. Select low sugar fruits - guava, berries, etc) instead of banana, mangoes and cheekoo. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. In addition, you need to exercise regularly. I usually recommend a combination of cardiovascular exercise (walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash), strength training (exercising with weights) and stretch exercises (yoga). Try to do the cardiovascular exercise for at least 40 minutes 4-5 times a week; strength training for about 20 minutes 3 times a week and stretch exercises for about 10-15 minutes twice a week. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: BISIKH
Recently i found that the uric acid level in my blood is 5.1 mg,cholestrol 219 mg and triglycerides 188 mg. I am feeling pain my ankles. Please advise the right food.
Answer : Dear Sekhar, Your blood levels of uric acid are within the normal range though on the higher side (normal uric acid: 2.0 - 7.5 mg%). Your cholesterol and triglyceride levels are borderline high (normal total cholesterol: below 200 mg % and triglycerides: below 150 mg%). All these levels can be brought within the normal ranges with proper dietary control. Let us discuss each of these one by one. High Uric acid level: When proteins break down in our body, uric acid is produced. Normally, this uric acid is excreted by the kidneys. However, when we eat a large amount of protein-rich foods, the uric acid content of urine increases and the excess uric acid precipitates causing kidney stones or gout. This means that what you eat and drink directly affects your chance of developing stone. So you need to: Drink lots and lots of water: Drinking 10-12 glasses of water every day reduce formation of kidney stones and can actually dissolve stones that have already formed. Try drinking one glass of water every waking hour. Watch your diet: . Limit intake of foods which produce a lot of uric acid in the body. Avoid pulses/beans/peas; red meat (goat/lamb/veal); organ meats (liver, kidney, brain); shellfish (lobster, crayfish, prawns, mussels, oysters, crabs, scallops); fish (anchovies, mackerel, sardines, herring); mushrooms, spinach, and asparagus. . Limit intake of high fat foods like oils/ghee/vanaspati/butter, gravies, whole milk (and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk), cream, ice cream, fried foods and salad dressings. Prefer low-fat dairy products. . Add a low-fat dairy product (in the form of milk, curd, raita, lassi, custard etc) to your meals. This increases the excretion of uric acid in the urine. Drinking lots of water with each meal has the same effect. . Avoid or limit alcohol. If you must drink, space your drinks with a glass of water. . Eat complex carbohydrates - chakki-ground atta, bran, oatmeal - since they help you get rid of extra uric acid. Avoid high fat, refined breads, biscuits, muffins, cakes, doughnuts and pancakes. . Eat fruits such as banana, apples, pears, guava, oranges, fresh cherries, pineapple, strawberries, blueberries, and other red-blue berries . If you are overweight, lose weight - but gradually. Rapid weight loss can increase uric acid levels. Check with your doctor about prescribing bicarbonate of soda or citrate which makes the urine alkaline and thus, helps in excretion of uric acid. High cholesterol and triglyceride levels: Reducing cholesterol and triglycerides in blood is the first, and the most important, step in preventing heart disease. This is particularly important if you are overweight or have high blood pressure and/or diabetes. The first step is to cut down on fat intake immediately. . Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. . No foods rich in saturated fats such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal, organ meats); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil. . Also avoid harmful fats like vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, namkeens, potato chips, nachos, snack foods and fried snacks like samosas, pakoras and vadas. . Say NO to cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras. . No salad dressings, sandwich spreads, ready-to-eat soups, curries, pasta etc. . No biscuits, cakes, cookies, brownies, pies, desserts and mithai. . No fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. Since sugar and alcohol have the greatest influence on triglycerides, limit the intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes, jelly and chocolates are out totally. Do not add sugar to food or drinks. Also, reduce alcohol intake or give up alcohol totally. Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as mustard oil and olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). At the same time, you need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Increase physical activity to at least 30-40 minutes 5-6 times a week. Walking, swimming, and biking are good choices. . If you smoke, quit immediately . Cut down on salt intake considerably These dietary and activity modifications may also correct high blood pressure and abnormal blood sugar which are often seen in people with high triglycerides. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: leena
Madam, I have posted a querry three weeks back, But till now no reply has come. last month .my Fourth chemo is also over. I am due for surgery. Please let me know the diet before late.
Answer : Dear Leena, Thank you for bearing with the delay. I sincerely apologize for it. I have already replied to you yesterday - I hope you have received it. Do write if you need any more clarifications/ information. I promise to respond immediately. In any case, I am resending you the reply: Dear Leena, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying to you. Do let me know what course of action your doctor has recommended on the 24th. Along with my apologies, I would like to give you some pointers for your diet during this period: Diet during chemotherapy is more or less a balanced diet with foods from all the five food groups - grains, pulses, milk, fruits and vegetables. 1. During chemotherapy, it is important to eat a diet which is rich in calories. Select foods that are high in fat like milk, milk products, eggs and red meat. Use more fats and oils in cooking. Use more butter on sandwiches and add tadka to dals, curd and curries. This will ensure that you maintain a healthy weight and do not feel weak. Do not worry too much about eating a diet high in fat and calories. After your treatment, I will recommend a healthier eating plan for you. 2. If you don't feel like eating much, you may find it easier to drink high calorie meals in a drink. While readymade liquid meals in different flavours are available with chemists and health stores, you can make your own high calorie milk shake, egg nog, smoothie or for a salty taste, a rich soup. 3. Boost protein in your diet to maximize energy, strength, immune function, and skin integrity. It will also prevent muscle breakdown. Protein in our diet typically comes from pulses, milk (and milk products like cheese, paneer, curd, khoya etc) and nuts. For non-vegetarians, eggs and meat/chicken/fish are great sources of good quality protein. Add a lot of protein to your diet: . Eat at least one katori of cooked dal once a day. Dals can also be added to soups, sandwich/parantha stuffings or eaten dry as chaat for breakfast or snacks. . use cheese in sandwiches, on eggs, vegetables, casseroles and pasta . drink milk at least twice a day; supplement with curd (as such or as lassi) and kheers/puddings/custards and icecream; eat paneer 3-4 times a week . if you are a non-vegetarian, add eggs wherever you can - boiled/poached/fried or in sandwiches, salads and casseroles. During treatment, it is okay to eat meat, chicken or fish for dinner everyday. . eat nuts - a handful as snacks or added to breakfast cereal, kheer, curd, vegetables, fruits, salads . add protein powders to milk, shakes, yoghurt and smoothies. 4. Also eat as many fruits as you like. They contain anti-oxidants which help our body fight cancer. Have at least 5 servings per day of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Do consult your doctor for vitamin and mineral supplements. 5. One of the main side effects of chemotherapy is loss of appetite. You will need to eat small meals often rather than trying to eat larger main meals. . Make every bite count - choose high calorie and protein foods so that you get more from less. . Keep nutritious snacks on hand at all times - nuts, sweet/salted biscuits, roasted grams etc. . Strive to eat at least 1/3 of your calorie and protein needs at breakfast. . Eat 5-6 small meals per day (this helps to sneak in extra calories and protein). . Don't be afraid to try something new, this might spark your appetite. 6. If you have difficulty in swallowing, take foods which go down easier - nutrient-rich milkshakes, soups & broths, fruit juices and porridges. Chew solid foods thoroughly. 7. For nausea and/or vomiting, avoid hot and spicy foods as well as greasy or fried foods, very sweet, sugary foods and foods with foods with strong smells (onion/garlic/red meat/etc). Also, do not drink beverages with meals and avoid lying down after a meal. Rinse your mouth with lemon water after eating. Suck on ice cubes, mints, or hard candies. TV, music, or reading may be helpful while eating. 8. If you have diarrhea after chemotherapy, it may be best to avoid foods rich in spices, fats, sugar and fiber. Do not have milk-based drinks or beverages containing caffeine (coffee, strong tea, soda, and possibly chocolate). Try a low fiber diet such as rice, moong dal, bananas, white bread, oatmeal, mashed potatoes, and skinless/boneless chicken). Also drink plenty of fluids. 9. Mouth care is important to maintain a good diet, especially during and after chemotherapy. Try a "swish and spit" solution: mix 1/2-1 teaspoon of salt or baking soda with a glass of water and rinse your mouth with this 4-5 times daily. Avoid oral care products that dry the mouth (i.e. products containing alcohol or peroxide). Suck on mints or lemon hard candy to keep mouth fresh. I am sure that these tips will help you a lot Leena. Do let me know your progress. I will definitely respond immediately. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Vishakha
I am 39 weighing 75 kg @ 152cm heigt.Have HYPOTHIORODISM for 10 years.(ELTROXIN 75mcg). Have mild high BP (Seloken XL 25 mg). Exercise regularly for an hour daily. My waight remains constant if and only if I exercise, or it increases. How can I reduce it?I am a Veg Maharashtrian.Please guide me about my food intake and eating habbits.Will you please give me any daily diet plan?
Answer : Dear Vishakha, Hypothyroidism slows down our metabolism or simply put, the rate at which our body burns (or uses up) fuel (food). This means that you burn fewer calories than a person with normal metabolism; consequently, your caloric requirements are lower and all spare calories from food are stored as fat. Considering that you have been hypothyroid for the past 10 years explains your excess weight of 15-20 kgs. Also, when you exercise regularly, you burn the extra calories and maintain your weight; otherwise, all the extra calories contribute to additional weight. So what do you need to do? You need to work out a balance between your food intake and the calories burnt by your body. You can do this by eating less calories, burning more calories and at the same time, boosting your metabolism so that it burns more calories. 1. Limit fat intake: Say no-no to deep-fried foods and namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. Use very little oil for cooking - choose healthier methods such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - strictly. 2. Limit intake of sugar and starches: Cut back on pasta, rice, potatoes, white breads, breakfast cereals, corn, peas, sweet potatoes, very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc), desserts and mithai. Colas, fruit drinks, fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates are out totally. 3. Eat more of complex, high-fiber carbohydrates - whole grains, husked (chilka) pulses, high-fiber vegetables (beans, peas, carrots, lotus stem, etc) - since the body burns more calories in digesting these as compared to simple carbohydrates. 4. Increase the protein intake of your diet since the body needs more energy to digest proteins. Eat more pulses and about 8-10 nuts everyday. 5. You can boost your metabolism by building muscle. Muscle burns more calories than fat. While you do exercise for an hour every day, adding weight-bearing or resistance exercise - such as weightlifting or exercise bands - to your routine. You may also need to add vitamin/mineral supplements- check with your doctor. 6. Drink lots of fluids - at least 8-10 glasses of water in addition to your routine intake of tea/coffee/milk/beverages/etc. In addition: . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Keep healthy snacks handy. Roasted chanas, tofu/paneer and fruits keep you going in-between meals. . Don't sample everything on the buffet table or at any get-together. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. These recommendations are the first step. Don't worry about your weight right now. Exercise regularly. Add on strength/weight training for about 10-15 minutes 3-4 times a week. Once you follow this regime, it will take some time (at least 6-8 weeks) for your weight to start falling. We can then work out a detailed diet plan for you. For your hypothyroidism, certain foods which contain goitrogens - chemicals which may worsen the thyroid disorder - are specifically to be avoided: soy (soybeans and all soy products such as soy milk, soy flour, nutrinuggets, and tofu), broccoli, radishes, turnips, spinach, mustard greens, cabbage and cauliflower. Although cooking these foods may reduce the effect, it is better to avoid them totally. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Leena
I am a patient of CA Brest. I asked you about the diet and have not received any mail.
Answer : Dear Leena, First of all, my sincere apologies for the delay in replying to you. Do let me know what course of action your doctor has recommended on the 24th. Along with my apologies, I would like to give you some pointers for your diet during this period: Diet during chemotherapy is more or less a balanced diet with foods from all the five food groups - grains, pulses, milk, fruits and vegetables. 1. During chemotherapy, it is important to eat a diet which is rich in calories. Select foods that are high in fat like milk, milk products, eggs and red meat. Use more fats and oils in cooking. Use more butter on sandwiches and add tadka to dals, curd and curries. This will ensure that you maintain a healthy weight and do not feel weak. Do not worry too much about eating a diet high in fat and calories. After your treatment, I will recommend a healthier eating plan for you. 2. If you don't feel like eating much, you may find it easier to drink high calorie meals in a drink. While readymade liquid meals in different flavours are available with chemists and health stores, you can make your own high calorie milk shake, egg nog, smoothie or for a salty taste, a rich soup. 3. Boost protein in your diet to maximize energy, strength, immune function, and skin integrity. It will also prevent muscle breakdown. Protein in our diet typically comes from pulses, milk (and milk products like cheese, paneer, curd, khoya etc) and nuts. For non-vegetarians, eggs and meat/chicken/fish are great sources of good quality protein. Add a lot of protein to your diet: . Eat at least one katori of cooked dal once a day. Dals can also be added to soups, sandwich/parantha stuffings or eaten dry as chaat for breakfast or snacks. . use cheese in sandwiches, on eggs, vegetables, casseroles and pasta . drink milk at least twice a day; supplement with curd (as such or as lassi) and kheers/puddings/custards and icecream; eat paneer 3-4 times a week . if you are a non-vegetarian, add eggs wherever you can - boiled/poached/fried or in sandwiches, salads and casseroles. During treatment, it is okay to eat meat, chicken or fish for dinner everyday. . eat nuts - a handful as snacks or added to breakfast cereal, kheer, curd, vegetables, fruits, salads . add protein powders to milk, shakes, yoghurt and smoothies. 4. Also eat as many fruits as you like. They contain anti-oxidants which help our body fight cancer. Have at least 5 servings per day of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Do consult your doctor for vitamin and mineral supplements. 5. One of the main side effects of chemotherapy is loss of appetite. You will need to eat small meals often rather than trying to eat larger main meals. . Make every bite count - choose high calorie and protein foods so that you get more from less. . Keep nutritious snacks on hand at all times - nuts, sweet/salted biscuits, roasted grams etc. . Strive to eat at least 1/3 of your calorie and protein needs at breakfast. . Eat 5-6 small meals per day (this helps to sneak in extra calories and protein). . Don't be afraid to try something new, this might spark your appetite. 6. If you have difficulty in swallowing, take foods which go down easier - nutrient-rich milkshakes, soups & broths, fruit juices and porridges. Chew solid foods thoroughly. 7. For nausea and/or vomiting, avoid hot and spicy foods as well as greasy or fried foods, very sweet, sugary foods and foods with foods with strong smells (onion/garlic/red meat/etc). Also, do not drink beverages with meals and avoid lying down after a meal. Rinse your mouth with lemon water after eating. Suck on ice cubes, mints, or hard candies. TV, music, or reading may be helpful while eating. 8. If you have diarrhea after chemotherapy, it may be best to avoid foods rich in spices, fats, sugar and fiber. Do not have milk-based drinks or beverages containing caffeine (coffee, strong tea, soda, and possibly chocolate). Try a low fiber diet such as rice, moong dal, bananas, white bread, oatmeal, mashed potatoes, and skinless/boneless chicken). Also drink plenty of fluids. 9. Mouth care is important to maintain a good diet, especially during and after chemotherapy. Try a "swish and spit" solution: mix 1/2-1 teaspoon of salt or baking soda with a glass of water and rinse your mouth with this 4-5 times daily. Avoid oral care products that dry the mouth (i.e. products containing alcohol or peroxide). Suck on mints or lemon hard candy to keep mouth fresh. I am sure that these tips will help you a lot Leena. Do let me know your progress. I will definitely respond immediately. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: renji
Madam, I have been going through your website and was impressed a lot. Whenever I came across my friends/relatives who are sick and needed a dietiecians advice, I suggested your site. And to my surprise almost all of them send queries to you. But to my great dissappointment, they all returned to me saying that till todate no reply has been forwarded. One month has passed by and they are out of their sickness. Even if you reply them, there is no use for them. Please do something to solve this issue
Answer : Dear Renji, Thank you very much for recommending this site. But what i am surprised is that I make it a point to answer all the queries that are posted. I wonder how some of them could have been left out. Since this has happened, i can only apologise for this inadvertent lapse. pls be assured that all queries will be answered at all times. Also, in future, please request your friends and relatives to send in their questions - I will definitely reply to them. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Shweta
My age is 46 years.My heigth is 140cms and my weight is 57kgs.What should be my weight according to my age and height and please tell me about my diet chart?
Answer : Dear Shweta, For your age and height, a weight of 45-47 kgs is ideal. At present, your BMI (or Body Mass Index is a measure of weight for height; the normal range of BMI is 18.5 - 24.9) is 29. Losing 7-10 kg will benefit your health greatly. This will require healthy changes in your diet and exercise patterns which you will need to follow - first to lose weight and then, to keep it off. To start with, I suggest you start on a 1200 calorie diet - the distribution of the calories across the different food groups is as follows: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice/ 2 biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Note that it is best to avoid sugar/honey and to restrict the fat intake strictly if you want to lose weight. Other tips which help you in successful weight loss are: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates. . Fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - are to be avoided strictly. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works in weight loss and lowers the risk of diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. Or you may take up yoga at least twice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pratibha
i am 2nd year student weighing 77kgs, my height is 5'3 and i am 19 yrs oldi have a pear shaped body with excessive weight on my hips and thighscan you plz suggest me a 5 course diet for weight reduction
Answer : Dear Pratibha, You need to lose at least 15 kg of weight. For your height, a weight of 62 kgs will mean a BMI of 24.2 (the BMI or Body Mass Index is a measure of weight for height) which will then be within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. At present, your BMI is 30.2. To be long-lasting, losing weight should be a gradual (about 2 kgs per month). You will need to combine a proper diet with regular exercise as well as an active lifestyle to bring your body back into shape. Once you achieve the weight loss, you will need to focus on keeping it off. I suggest you consult a weight management consultant in your area who will analyze your body profile and lifestyle and then suggest specific dietary and activity modifications. But beware of weight loss consultants who promise quick weight loss. I would like to give you some tips about successful weight loss: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy and chocolates. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. . Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Supriya
Hi Meeta,At present my weight is 68. My height is 5ft 1inch. As of my knowledge im overweight. I would like to reduce my weight to 55. Can you provide me proper diet for a day? I do yoga for 40 mins per day. Would like to hear your suggestion soon. Thank you.
Answer : Dear Supriya, At present, your BMI is 28.3 (the BMI or Body Mass Index is a measure of weight for height; the normal range of BMI is 18.5 - 24.9). I agree with you that bringing your weight down to 55 kg will bring your BMI well within the normal range. This means a weight loss of 13 kg which will require following a proper diet and exercise regime. It is a great thing that you are already doing yoga. First, let's get a few facts straight: . Our body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. But both changes need to be done sensibly. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . Any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well. Being women with great responsibility for home, children and work, we are less likely to devote extra time on taking special measures for ourselves. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? To start with, I suggest you start on a 1200 calorie diet - the distribution of the calories across the different food groups is as follows: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice/ 2 biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Note that it is best to avoid sugar/honey and to restrict the fat intake strictly if you want to lose weight. Some other tips about successful weight loss: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy, cakes and chocolates. . Fast foods - sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, patties - are to be avoided strictly. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. In addition to yoga, take up some cardiovascular exercise - walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week is good enough. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: priya
i am student studying in first year, weighing 60kgs and my height is 5'2 nd i am 17 yrs oldmy body is apple shaped having big stomach and full breasts. also i am addicted to coffee and i need atleast 2 mugs of coffee per day.can you plz suggest me a proper diet for weight reduction.with regards - priya
Answer : Dear Priya, You can do with some weight reduction. Since you are a young girl who will soon be going out into the world, your goal should be to achieve a weight loss of about 15 kgs over the next one year. Remember, weight loss should always be gradual (about 1-2 kgs per month). Drastic weight losses play havoc with our body systems and weight lost fast also comes back fast. This target weight loss of 15 kgs combined with regular exercising and an active lifestyle will also bring your body back into shape. Once you achieve the weight loss, you will need to focus on keeping it off. I suggest a 1200 calories diet for you. The distribution of calories over the various food groups for you should be: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice/ 2 biscuits) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Note that it is best to avoid sugar/honey and to restrict the fat intake strictly if you want to lose weight. ALSO REMEMBER: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. . Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. . Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. . Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. Eat your favorite apple pie, potato chips, candy or ice cream once in a while. . Keep healthy snacks handy: low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit, unsweetened wholegrain biscuits, roasted chanas or tofu/paneer. . Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. . Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. . Totally avoid deep-fried foods; namkeens, chips and popcorn; red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it. . Say a definite NO-NO to colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices, candy and chocolates. . Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. . Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on 20 minutes of yoga twice or thrice a week. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. As far as drinking coffee is concerned: Go ahead. Have your 2 cups of coffee a day but make it with skim/toned milk and add no sugar! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Sam
Can a diabetic patient can use honey instead of sugar.
Answer : Dear Sam, Honey contains fructose, the sugar found naturally in fruits (just like lactose is the milk sugar). Table (or processed or white) sugar is a combination of glucose and fructose. Fructose is better than table sugar because the body takes longer to break down its chemical bonds; the release of glucose in the blood, therefore, is slower. On the other hand, table sugar is absorbed and released instantly into the blood. So yes, honey is better because it does spike blood sugar levels like table sugar. But at the end of the day, fructose, glucose, dextrose, lactose, sucrose, maltoses . are all sugars and raise blood sugar levels. If you must eat honey, restrict it to about a teaspoon a day. Also make sure that you balance it by reducing the amounts of other carbohydrates you eat. For example, exchange half a slice of bread (or half a roti) for one teaspoon of sugar or honey. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: diana
i have dabetics,what type of food can i have?please help thanks
Answer : Dear Diana, I assume you have been prescribed some medicines for your diabetes. In any case, with or without medicine, a proper diet and exercise plan will be very effective in maintaining your blood glucose levels within the normal range. The following foods are good for you and will ensure that your meals remain tasty and satisfying. Please remember that being a diabetic does not mean being sentenced to a lifetime of eating a few, selected foods day in and day out. 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. You may also try drinking soy milk which is ideal for diabetics - it is low in lactose (milk sugar) and saturated fats. At the same time, it does not contain cholesterol and is rich in good quality proteins. 8. Sugar/honey: It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Fats: Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works for diabetics. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Cycling, swimming, playing tennis, aerobic dancing and rope skipping are also good. But let your doctor decide which and how much exercise is safe for you. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: K
Can you please suggest a diat chart for diabetic patient with F-B.S. 120 and P-B.S. 150?Note: Patient is without medication.
Answer : Dear Manoj, A fasting blood sugar of 120 mg/dl indicates a borderline case of diabetes - that is, on the way to full-blown diabetes. Making lifestyle changes at this stage - eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy body weight and no smoking - can delay the development of diabetes to a very great extent. I do not know whether the patient has consulted a doctor yet - a FBS above 100 mg/dl requires a visit to the doctor although medicines may not be prescribed yet. Since I do not know the age, weight, height and activity pattern of the patient, it is difficult to suggest a specific diet. However, the following tips on making healthy food choices will help him/her greatly. Also, remember that being a diabetic does not mean being sentenced to a lifetime of eating a few, selected foods day in and day out. 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. You can also try soy milk which is nutritious and does not contain cholesterol, saturated fats and lactose (milk sugar). 8. Sugar/honey: It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Fats: Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, the patient should: . Make sure that meals do not make his/her blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that he/she needs to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. He/she should not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. . Quit smoking immediately. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works for diabetics. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: the patient should start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Cycling, swimming, playing tennis, aerobic dancing and rope skipping are also good. But let your doctor decide which and how much exercise is safe for the patient. Also, the patient should try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. He/she will build more muscle so that the body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in the blood. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Leena
I am a patient of CA Brest. I asked you about the diet and have not received any mail.
Answer : Dear Leena, I have received your earlier mail and will be replying to you shortly. Please bear with me. Meeta
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Question by: Ramachandran
Can you pl suggest a healthy diet for a 40 yrs old diabetic (type-II) person having sedentary job.
Answer : Dear Ramachandran, I assume you have been prescribed some medicines for your diabetes. In any case, with or without medicine, a proper diet and exercise plan will be very effective in maintaining your blood glucose levels within the normal range. Though I do not know your weight and height, I suggest a 1800-2000 calories diet with the following balance of the various food groups: Cereals - 7 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Skim/double toned milk - 3-4 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/Nuts - 3-4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Being a diabetic does not mean being sentenced to a lifetime of eating a few, selected foods day in and day out. The following tips will help you in making healthy food choices which are also tasty and satisfying: 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. You can also try soy milk which is nutritious and does not contain cholesterol, saturated fats and lactose (milk sugar). 8. Sugar/honey: It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Fats: Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works for diabetics. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Cycling, swimming, playing tennis, aerobic dancing and rope skipping are also good. But let your doctor decide which and how much exercise is safe for you. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Malathi
Hi Meeta Lall,My hubby is a diabetic and takes the diet prescribed.He suffers Cynusitis.Hence he is reluctant in taking buttermilk for breaks,instead happy with hot plain milk along with a few cups of coffee.In that case his milk consumption in a day is 1 ltr.(buffalo milk,not very thick)Please let me know whether he is allowed this qtty. per day.Looking forward to your advice.ThankYou,Malathi.
Answer : Dear Malathi, Hot plain milk is fine for your husband though 4-5 cups a day does seem to be on the higher side. Diabetics are usually recommended 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml) of skim or double toned milk. This means that your husband can easily drink a glass of milk and enjoy one small katori curd made from skim milk everyday. Your husband can try natural soy milk (without added flavor or sugar). Soy milk is made from soy beans and contains good quality proteins. It does not contain cholesterol or lactose - the sugar in animal milk and is also low in saturated fat (bad fat). Today, soy milk is becoming increasingly popular as a tasty and nutritious drink. It may also do to limit the use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas - about two cups of coffee (again made from skim milk) should be fine. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anand
My fasting sugar-171 and after meal is 212.could you pl.tell me what Diet should I take? Thanks
Answer : Dear Anand, I assume you have been prescribed some medicines for your diabetes. In any case, with or without medicine, a proper diet and exercise plan will be very effective in maintaining your blood glucose levels within the normal range. Since I do not know your age, weight, height and activity pattern, I cannot suggest the amounts of various food groups that you need to eat every day. Nonetheless, the following foods are good for you and will ensure that your meals remain tasty and satisfying. Please remember that being a diabetic does not mean being sentenced to a lifetime of eating a few, selected foods day in and day out. 1. Whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as biscuits, mathis, pasta, sandwiches, burgers and pizza. 2. Legumes (or dals) especially the ones eaten with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 4. Fruits like apples, oranges, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices, jams, jellies and colas. 5. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat totally - goat meat, pig, beef, organ meats. Have 1-2 eggs per week. 6. Nuts - about 8-10 almonds (or even groundnuts/peanuts) a day is ideal. 7. Milk, curd and paneer made from low fat milk. 8. Sugar/honey: It is best to avoid sugar/honey though occasional indulging in a sweet or dessert is fine as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is consistent. Candy, chocolates and mithai are a definite NO-NO. 9. Artificial sweeteners: Avoid artificial sweeteners totally. Highly popular among diabetics and dieters, these sweeteners actually aggravate diabetes. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. 10. Fats: Choose the cooking oil with care. Mustard oil, olive oil, groundnut oil and safflower/sunflower/soybean oils are fine. Avoid saturated fats like butter, butter substitutes, desi ghee, vanaspati and margarine as also cream, sandwich spreads, mayonnaise, readymade dips. Fried foods like pakoras, samosas, fried fish and also chips, nachos, namkeens increase the fat and salt intake harmfully. In addition, you should: . Make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. . Eat meals regularly. Do not skip meals at all. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Drink eight glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration which is particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. . Avoid indulging in fad diets. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt such as bread, biscuits, readymade cereals, cheese, packaged soups, chutneys, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. A few words about exercising: Research proves that a good diet combined with exercise really works for diabetics. Exercise helps in weight loss and makes body cells more receptive to insulin; this controls blood sugar better and lowers the risk of heart disease. Walking is great exercise: start walking for 15 or 20 minutes, 3-4 times a week, and gradually increase the speed or distance of the walks. A total time of about 40-45 minutes a day at least 5 days a week is the ideal exercise routine. Cycling, swimming, playing tennis, aerobic dancing and rope skipping are also good. But let your doctor decide which and how much exercise is safe for you. Also try to add at least a couple of days of resistance or strength training (using weights) in a week. You'll build more muscle so that your body burns glucose more efficiently leaving less hanging around in your blood. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Rajinder
Dear Ms. Meeta Lall,First, you have got a beautiful first name.Now, my query. I am 43 years old male legal professional. I often leave home in a hurry and can eat breakfast only in my staff bus. Although I may be able to remedy the situation, meanwhile what kind of breakfast I can have, readily available in the market.Secondly, what the maximum number of almonds I can have in breakfast, and then during the day. What are other energy boosters for the breakfast and during the day (something readily available from the market).Regards,Best Wishes,Rajinder K
Answer : Dear Rajinder, Thank you. I will be writing to you shortly. Please bear with me. Meeta
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Question by: laju
I am 70 years old lady suffering from Vericose Veins plus Osteoporosis;Kindly let me know if there is any treatment for vericose;As for for Osteoporosis I have been prescribed daily dosage of Shelcal 500 mg each of type OS and M at times I get slight tummy upset and wonder if I can give Shelcal a miss onthat day,as I suspect these capsules could be the cause.Regards Laju
Answer : Dear Lajuji, Your physician is the best judge for deciding upon the treatment of varicose veins. Also, do mention the problem of tummy upset along with Shelcal tablets. For some, calcium supplements do cause stomach upset, constipation or nausea. Your doctor may prescribe a different brand or form, e.g., chewable or effervescent tablets, to find a suitable product for you. In addition to calcium supplements, your bones, just like muscles, need physical activity to retain strength. Walking 30 minutes 4-5 times a week is ideal for you. If you are not comfortable walking for 30 minutes at a stretch, divide the walk into three parts of 10 minutes each three times a day. The benefits are the same. You can also increase the intake of calcium through your foods. Have at least to 3-4 servings of milk (and milk products) every day. Increase the consumption of calcium-rich foods (milk and milk products, soybean, tofu, almonds, broccoli, turnip leaves. A word of caution: Since you are osteoporotic, you need to reduce any chances of falling: ensure adequate lighting within the home; turn on light when you get up in the night. Eliminate clutter and rearrange furniture to avoid the risk of tripping; also remove rugs and place non-slip mats in the bathroom; get your vision checked regularly and wear correct footwear. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Prabhakaran
Is it advisable for a perfectly normal person to take ananbolic steroids to improve muscle mass? If not, what would you suggest for a stronger body?
Answer : Dear Prabhakaran, Anabolic steroids are man-made drugs which promote muscle-building, and increase masculine characteristics. These drugs are available legally only by prescription for treatment in AIDS patients etc and are banned for athletes. Abuse of anabolic steroids, can lead to serious health problems: liver tumors and cancer, jaundice, fluid retention, high blood pressure, increases in LDL (bad cholesterol), kidney tumors, severe acne, and trembling. They can also mess with the male reproductive system. Scientific research also shows that aggression, extreme mood swings, depression, paranoid jealousy, extreme irritability, delusions, and impaired judgment. I don't think a perfectly normal person needs these steroids to improve muscle mass. Instead, stick to a balanced diet (with lots of protein) and exercise regularly. You can always consult a workout expert who will guide you in the proper exercises. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Ebin
I'm 22yrs old , weighin aroun 92kgs , 180 cms. I'm stayin in coimbatore as a hostler . I would like you to suggest a diet for me that will help me reduce my weight to 75. I'm prone to go on feeding frenzy s occasionally, pls tell how to control such urges.
Answer : Dear Ebin, For a tall young man like you, a weight of about 75 kg will be ideal. This means that you need to lose about 15-17 kgs. I suggest you consult a nutritionist in your area (Coimbatore has plenty of nutritionists and weight management consultants) who will analyze your body composition and lifestyle and then suggest changes in your diet and exercise pattern. Also, weight loss is a gradual process. In your case, a loss of 2-3 kgs a month would be adequate. Remember, weight loss should never be sudden and drastic - it plays havoc with all the body systems. Since you are a hosteller, there would be some restrictions to the kind of food you get - but you can still manage to lose weight by making the right food choices. As for your binges, we usually binge when we have starved ourselves to the point of "I don't care" and eat whatever comes our way. Never let such a situation develop. Never starve yourself. Eat small, frequent meals - 3 main meals and two snacks in-between - so that your body always has adequate fuel to work. Keep a few nutritious snacks available - both at work and in the hostel. Roasted chanas and other roasted namkeens; low sugar fruits like apple, guava and pear; tofu (a soybean product which is available commercially nowadays); a boiled egg; crunchy vegetables etc are healthy snacks. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: amit
mam i m suffering from acid reflux what i should eat and what should i avoid ca i eat curd(dahi)and eeg if yes than when and in what quantity
Answer : Dear Amit, Simple lifestyle changes can deal with your acid problem in the long run: 1. Avoid eating big meals especially at dinnertime since they cause the stomach to produce extra acid to digest the food. Instead, eat small meals frequently - 5-6 times a day. 2. Avoid foods that trigger acidity: Alcohol; beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea and colas); citrus fruits and juices; tomatoes and tomato sauces; chocolate; spicy and fatty foods. Beer is worst for acidity - it could double your stomach acid within an hour. Also cut down on foods made from refined grains such as maida and corn flour (pasta/noodles/white bread/biscuits/naan/bhaturas/buns). Instead, include high fiber foods such as whole grains (whole wheat flour/bread/brown rice/whole wheat pasta), legumes with husk, fruits and vegetables in each meal. 3. Don't drink too much fluids including water along with the food. 4. Try to eat dinner at least 1-2 hours before sleeping. 5. After eating, maintain upright position for at least 45 minutes. Don't do any vigorous activity like gardening which requires you to bend for at least an hour after eating. 6. Keep your head elevated by 6-8 inches when lying down. A lot of people try drinking milk to ease acid stomach before sleep. Though milk may provide a quick fix, it actually encourages the secretion of more acid during sleep. Try a small snack such as crackers before going to bed. 7. If you're overweight, lose the extra pounds. Obesity increases abdominal pressure, which can then push stomach contents up into the esophagus. 8. Don't wear belts or tight-fitting clothes around the waist. 9. Stop smoking 10. Keep a heartburn record. Record what triggered your acid episode, its severity and what gives you relief. You can also discuss this with your doctor to figure out lifestyle changes which will work best for you. 11. Many people report that chewing gum relieves acidity. Although the exact mechanism is not clear, chewing gum after meals is certainly worth a try. 12. Antacids provide quick, but brief, relief. Within an hour of eating, acid again accumulates in the stomach. The best way to take antacids is to take it one hour after meals or just before the symptoms of reflux begin after a meal. Try another dose approximately two hours after the meal again. Regarding your query about dahi and eggs, there is no specific reason why they should be eliminated due to the acidity problem. Try eating dahi and also, eggs; if there is no great acidity problem, go ahead and enjoy! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Jaya
Iam 40 yrs of age, ht 154 cm, weighing 60 kgs. I have been suffering from back ache in the L4-L5 region of the spine for almost 4 years now.I have tried to diet to lose weight but this has only aggravated my back pain.Kindly suggest a suitable diet chart that i can follow.[I am neither diabetic nor do i have BP.Iam not a heart patient either, and am a vegetarian]
Answer : Dear Jaya, Any pain which has persisted for such a long time needs to be checked out. Please consult a good orthopaedic doctor who will examine your back. I don't think your weight loss had anything to do with aggravating your back pain . As far as a suitable diet is concrerned, you do need to lose some weight. Even a small weight loss of 5-6 kg would greatly reduce the pressure on your back. Though I do not know your current diet, I think a 1200 calorie diet should be adequate for you - this should ensure a steady and gradual weight loss of 1-2 kgs every month. Remember, weight loss should never be sudden and drastic - it plays havoc with all the body systems. Approximately, you need to consume the following food groups in the suggested amounts: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) . Distribute the above food groups across 3 main meals and 2 small snacks. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Small, frequent meals provide a steady supply of calories and keep hunger in control. Reduce portion size at each meal. Eat slowly and stop eating when slightly hungry. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Between-meal snacks are fine as long as you stick to low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit or unsweetened wholegrain biscuits. . Avoid fatty foods - fried foods, namkeens, chips fast foods; vegetables cooked in lots of oil; paranthas; chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, cheese, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings. . High calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; colas and sweet fruit juices; foods made from maida such as white bread/biscuits/pasta/white rice/naan/bhaturas/buns/soup sticks; potatoes, sweet potato, arbi and yam. . When you give up sugar/honey, don't be tempted to add artificial sweeteners. These sugar substitutes have far worse health effects upon the body than sugar itself. . Avoid red meats completely and alcohol if you drink. Instead opt for healthy white meats like chicken and fish. An occasional glass of wine will be good. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Chaitu
I am 23/f .my height is 5.4' and my weight is 53KGs.My problem is I dont have healthy look on my face.I appear to be very week.I have very less calcium content(can be judged by seeing my nails) and my heamoglobin is 8gms and 60.I dont have any other problems.Could you please suggest me the proper diet.
Answer : Dear Chaitu, You have a good figure and a great Body Mass Index (an index which considers weight for height). Keep it up. As far as your iron status is concerned, yes, you do need to increase your hemoglobin level - I suggest you consult a physician who can recommend an optimal dose of an iron-folate-zinc supplement which will bring your Hb level to at least 11-12 gm%. If you are a non-vegetarian, increase their frequency: Have chicken and fish at least 3-4 times a week. Eat at least 2-3 eggs a week and organ meats like liver - a rich source of iron - at least once a week (organ meats are fatty and usually not recommended but you are a young girl with low iron levels and could do with the extra shot of nutrients found in liver). Studies show that vegetarian foods have very little iron which is poorly absorbed by our body. Non-vegetarian foods contain iron in an easily absorbable form. Once your hemoglobin improves, your looks and physical ability to do work will also go up tremendously. As far as your nails are concerned, calcium deficiency may not be the actual cause. Show your nails to your physician. In any case, there is no harm in having milk (two cups a day) and its products (cheese, paneer, curd) at least once a day. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: shilpa
I am 29yrs I am too fat 65kg and i have tummi too much after my second baby, to flaten my ubdomen what ihave to do. from past 1yr i am doing exercise it is not used so much ple give me tip
Answer : Dear Shilpa, Since I don't know your height, it will be difficult to understand by how much you are 'too fat'. In any case, fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the abdomen. A waist circumference greater than 35inches is a high risk factor in women for high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. Exercising to get rid of abdominal fat is actually a misconception: engaging the muscles of the abdomen will not eliminate fat from the abdomen. This is probably the reason why you have not been able to reduce your tummy fat despite exercising for the past one year. The truth is that your body decides where to put fat and where to remove it. There is no food, no exercise, and no herb that will cause your body to remove fat from one place versus another. So if you want to reduce body fat (and tummy fat), you need to take a whole-body approach. Start consuming fewer calories than you expend on a daily basis. In other words, have a calorie deficit. In time, your body will start converting fat into useable energy, and by doing so, fat stores will begin to vanish across your body. But they won't just magically disappear from one particular place. Since I do not know your height and activity pattern, I suggest you reduce the quantity of food you eat to the tune of 500 calories. . Include foods from all food groups - cereals, pulses, milk, fruits and vegetables - at every meal. . Avoid fatty foods - fried foods, namkeens, chips fast foods; vegetables cooked in lots of oil; paranthas; chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, cheese, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings. . High calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; colas and sweet fruit juices; foods made from maida such as white bread/biscuits/pasta/white rice/naan/bhaturas/buns/soup sticks; potatoes, sweet potato, arbi and yam. . When you give up sugar/honey, don't be tempted to add artificial sweeteners. These sugar substitutes have far worse health effects upon the body than sugar itself. . Avoid red meats completely and alcohol if you drink. Instead opt for healthy white meats like chicken and fish. An occasional glass of wine will be good. . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Small, frequent meals provide a steady supply of calories and keep hunger in control. Reduce portion size at each meal. Eat slowly and stop eating when slightly hungry. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Between-meal snacks are fine as long as you stick to low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit or unsweetened wholegrain biscuits. In addition to a healthy diet, you need to engage in routine physical exercise. Include one cardiovascular exercise (for example, walking 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week) and one short strength training session (that is, training with weights for 10-15 minutes at least 3-4 times a week). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: GEORGE
Bitter Milan: How effective is it for a diabetic patient ? Do you have more advise on this issue of Bitter milan use ?Thanx...........GT
Answer : Dear George, Many scientific studies have now proved the Ayurvedic claim that bitter melon - or bitter gourd or karela - has unique therapeutic properties - especially in controlling diabetes. The green karela has 32 active ingredients which also aid recovery from viral infections, improve digestion and stimulate poor appetite. Karela is also rich in potassium, calcium, iron, beta-carotene, vitamins B1, B2, B3 and C. There is no recommended dose of bitter melon - some people prefer preparing fresh juice of karela everyday; others buy the various powder, capsules, pulp and injectable forms available commercially. So, go ahead, have karela. But do check with your doctor before buying the commercially available formulations. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Kris
Madam,I m 24 years old and am beginning to loose my hair.the growth is less on the front portion and m able to see my scalp on the top back portion.Is there any particular diet i have to follow to restore my hair back.
Answer : Dear Krish, Don't worry, you're not alone. Hair loss is affecting more and more young people like you due to tension, too much work, illness, poor diet or excessive dieting, over-exposure to the sun, and too frequent or inexpert use of colorants. Since hair is primarily protein, you need to eat lots of good quality protein (eggs, milk and meat, especially fish; if vegetarian, milk and pulses are excellent) and plenty of green leafy vegetables and fresh fruits. Iron supplements (Fefol Z, Fesovit, etc) also help; check with your doctor. Give up junk food - it is full of refined carbohydrates (maida, cornflour, etc) and fats. In fact, the traditional Indian diet combining roti (made from whole wheat flour which is preferably stone ground), pulses, curds and vegetables is ideal for health and of course, hair. Drinking 10-12 glasses of water a day also helps. Exercise regularly. This will also relieve stress and improve blood circulation. Remember, to prevent hair fall, the scalp needs to be kept clean. Use a mild shampoo and condition your hair at least twice a week. Alternate with an anti-dandruff and regular shampoo. Rinse out the conditioner thoroughly to prevent residue build-up which makes hair look limp and dull. There are a number of other hair care measures which will reduce your hair fall: Massage your scalp with oil (almond/ almond + castor oil/ olive oil/ coconut oil) at least once a week. Wrap a hot towel around your scalp so the oil gets absorbed into the hair. Grind fenugreek seeds in water and apply on your scalp. Wash off after 40 minutes. Curd and eggs are great conditioners. Whip them up together (with some oil) and apply to hair half an hour before a wash, and shampoo off with room temperature water. Henna, too, is a good conditioner but it makes hair brittle and easily breakable in the long run after prolonged use. Don't brush or comb hair when wet, as it will break. First, remove the tangles from the ends of your hair, and then comb your hair from the entire length. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: K.Gopinath
please
Answer : Dear Gopinath, I seem to have lost the original detailed question that you sent me. can you send it to me again??? sorry to delay the answer ... Meeta
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Question by: K.Gopinath
please
Answer : Dear Gopinath, I seem to have lost the original detailed question that you sent me. can you send it to me again??? sorry to delay the answer ... Meeta
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Question by: V.Srinivasan
Madam,My son is two yaers old. I would like to know the best balanced diet for his overall growth, particularly for his brain development. Thank you.
Answer : Dear Srinivasan, A two year old child ideally eats everything that is routinely cooked in the household. Does you son eat the family food or is food still made especially for him? The sooner he starts eating family food, the better life will be for your wife! After the rapid growth in the first year, growth now is pretty slow for your son; his appetite will also be poor. So instead of quantity, the focus should be on providing your son all the minerals and vitamins which will keep him glowing and healthy. At this age, your son should be more or less consuming the following portion sizes of various foods. Cereals - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 small plate rice or porridge/ two biscuits) Pulses - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg). If vegetarian, substitute meat exchange with 1 exchange of pulse or milk Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Roots & tubers - ½ exchange ((1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Green leafy vegetables - ½ exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 1/2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Children of this age are usually disinterested in food and develop food jags: refusing previously accepted foods or asking for the same food at each meal. They are also very selective: they may simply refuse to eat vegetables and pulses which can cause deficiency of important nutrients. Follow these five golden rules which will make your and your child's life easier: Rule 1: No child can be forced to eat Do not force-feed the child. Continue to offer a variety of foods including the child's favorite foods. Be ingenuous - instead of getting him to eat the dal and vegetables, mix them with the rice or the porridge etc. Rule 2: Give small, frequent meals At this age, your son has a small stomach: give him 6-8 small meals a day. Give him 2 tablespoons of food at one time; serve more only if he wants it. Add small amounts of fats/oils/nuts which enrich the food without making it bulky. Rule 3: Present food well Present the food well. Humor food quirks such as not eating foods that touch each other on the plate, mixed dishes, broken biscuits or a wrongly cut sandwich. Rule 4: Seat your son comfortably Serve food at the table at all times. The height of the chair and table should be age-appropriate. Bowls, plates and cups should be unbreakable and heavy enough to resist tipping. Thick, short handled spoons and forks allow for easier less tiring grasp. Rule 5: Do not disturb the feeding schedule Stick to a regular feeding schedule every day with a meal every 3 hours. Schedule a quiet activity or rest before the meal so that the child is relaxed and can enjoy the meal. Do not give any food or drink within one and a half hours of a meal. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: amreen
Is it important to remove carbs from ones diet to lose weight? If not in what form can one have it?
Answer : Dear Amreen, Short-term studies have found that low-carbohydrate diets can produce weight loss; however, no study has demonstrated that such diets are safe or effective for long-term use. In fact, this is the basis for the Atkins diet - the most talked about diet for many years. Many low-carbohydrate foods are also available now in the market but most of these foods are much higher in fat than the foods they are designed to replace. Instead of removing carbohydrates totally from your diet (and substituting them with high fat foods), I suggest that you cut down on carbohydrates such that 50 per cent of the total calories in your diet come from fat. This is the recommended carbohydrate content in a balanced diet. Another 20-25 % should come from protein and fats each. So, in your case, it is more a question of substituting 'bad' carbohydrates with 'good' carbohydrates. Bad carbohydrates mean: . Sugar and sugar-rich foods like mithai, sodas, fruit juices, biscuits, cakes, chocolate and candy. . Foods naturally rich in sugar/starch such as milk; very sweet fruits (banana, mango, cheekoo, etc); roots like potatoes, sweet potato, colocasia (arbi), beetroot, and yam. . Foods made from refined cereals (where the fiber from the grain has been removed to give a smooth, fine product) such as white bread, biscuits, cakes, pasta, white rice breakfast cereals and noodles. On the other hand, the 'good' carbohydrates are unrefined and still contain the whole grain, including the bran and the germ; they are higher in fiber and keep you feeling fuller for longer - which is especially great if you're trying to lose weight and do not want to feel hungry all the time. So, go for a brown bread sandwich instead of a white bread one; opt for oats and wheat flakes in your breakfast cereal; try out whole wheat pasta and noodles; start buying brown (or unpolished) rice; select fiber rich biscuits and so on. Also increase the amount of water you drink. The body does not digest fiber, so you need the extra water to help it flow through your digestive system with ease. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: krish
I am 24 years old and i am beginning to loose hair.i got very thin hair on the front and the scalp is also slightly exposed on the back.Is there any food i would have to eat to get a good hair growth? can my lost hair be restored back?
Answer : Dear Krish, I will be replying to you shortly. Kindly bear with me. Meeta
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Question by: anand
what food a diabetic person should take ?
Answer : Dear Anand, I will be replying to you shortly. Kindly bear with me. Meeta
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Question by: V.Srinivasan
Madam,My son is two yaers old. I would like to know the best balanced diet for his overall growth, particularly for his brain development. Thank you.
Answer : Dear Srinivasan, I will be replying to you shortly. Kindly bear with me. Meeta
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Question by: surendra
Could u pls tell me the meaning of word SHABISHTA
Answer : Dear Surendra, Is this term used in connection with food or nutrition? I have heard of this word being a name but I have no clue as to its meaning. Meeta Lall
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Question by: p.k.das
I am 72 yrs old. Height-5'.6'',weight-85kg,blood sugar-fasting-167mg,pp-118mg, other findings are within normal range.I will have to go for a cataract operation in dec.I want to know what should be my diet in order to cut down my weight and sugar level.
Answer : Dear Mr. Das, You definitely need to take care of your diet and reduce your weight as well as blood sugar levels. In fact, reducing your weight will have an extremely positive effect on lowering the blood sugar. You will need to combine dietary changes with some exercise suitable for your age to make this happen. Remember, at your age, severe dieting is not recommended; you just need to stick to the recommended amounts of food and make healthy food choices. Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Skim/double toned milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/Nuts - 3-4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) To help you in making healthy choices, hear are some tips. Note that most of these foods are part of our traditional Indian diets. 1. Go in for whole grain flours and cereals like whole grain atta (or atta milled at home), brown rice, whole wheat bread/noodles/pasta instead of refined flour (maida) or corn flour products like pasta, noodles, pizza, bread, biscuits, cakes, etc. 2. Eat pulses with the husk like chana, moong and black masoor. 3. Fish and chicken breast are great if you are a non-vegetarian. Avoid red meat and organ meats. 4. Vegetables like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce. Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas, and legumes such as peas which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 5. Fruits like apple, orange, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are fine but avoid the high sugar fruits like mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices and colas. 6. Fats - Oil added at the time of cooking should be minimal. One teaspoon of oil can be substituted with 7-8 almonds. 7. Drink only low fat milk and consume milk products (curd/paneer) made from the skim/double-toned milk. 8. avoid sugar totally. If you drink, stop taking alcohol completely. In addition, you should: . Not skip meals or snacks. Eat breakfast daily. . Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. . Eat smaller portions at every meal. Learn about the right serving sizes for you. . Eat nutritious snacks and have them available throughout the day. . Eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. . Drink 8-10 glasses of water each day to avoid dehydration. . Use less salt in cooking and at the table. Eat fewer foods that are high in salt, like canned and packaged soups, pickles, and processed meats. . Limit use of caffeine through tea/coffee/diet colas and also, alcohol. Walking is the best activity for you. Start walking for 30-40 minutes everyday. But this need not be one long walk - you can walk for short periods of 10 minutes each. The beneficial effect is the same. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: p.k.das
Iam 72yrs old,height5.6'',weight85kg,fasting blood sugar167mg,pp118mg.Will undergo cataract operation in Dec07.I want to know what will be my diet till Dec so that I can reduce my weight and fasting blood sugar level.Thanking you .Yours truly,Pkd.
Answer : Dear Mr. Das, I hope you got my earlier mail. Meeta
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Question by: K.V.Balakrishnan
I have bought OLIVE OIL. Could you please let me know HOW TO USE in cooking? and its benefits.
Answer : Dear Balakrishnan, Olive oil is a great oil to cook with. It is low in saturated fatty acids and rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Or simply put, it is good for the heart since it lowers the 'bad' LDL cholesterol and increases the 'good' HDL cholesterol. It also contains beneficial antioxidants which prevent ageing and fight cancer especially breast cancer. Olive oil can also reduce blood pressure and help regulate blood sugars. Though I do not know the type of olive oil you have purchased, here is an easy and quick guide to select the right type of oil: Extra-Virgin Olive Oil is obtained after the first cold pressing of the olive fruit (or oil which is unrefined with very little processing with heat) and is the most expensive. It is used for salads and dressings, or drizzling over slices of crusty bread or sandwiches, baked potatoes, cooked vegetables or brushed onto fish or meat before serving. Virgin olive oil is slightly lower in grade than extra-virgin oil, this made from slightly riper olives. Refined Olive Oil is made by refining the virgin olive oil giving tasteless oil. Pure Olive Oil or just olive oil comes either from the second cold pressing or the chemical extraction of the olive mash left over after the first pressing. Lighter and blander, it is a general-purpose (all-purpose) olive oil. Both refined and pure olive oil can be used for stir frying, sautéing and cooking. Pure olive oil is excellent for frying since it has a higher smoking point. Light & Extra Light" Olive Oil is a mixture of refined olive oils from the lowest quality olive oils processed chemically. It can be used for raw use as in salads etc as well as for cooking. I recommend that you buy a bottle of Pure olive oil for use in cooking including frying; also keep a small bottle of the delightfully flavored extra-virgin oil for use in salads etc. Since heat (together with air, light and time) is one of olive oil's natural enemies, simply keep it in small dark bottles tightly capped in a cool cupboard. Because India is a hot country, buy olive oil in as small a bottle as possible. If you buy a large amount, repackage it into smaller containers and refrigerate (do not refrigerate extra virgin varieties because condensation may develop in the bottle, affecting the flavor). The oil should never be stored in plastic or in reactive metals. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Kutty
Dear Dr.I am staying in Dubai.I am having 1 kg. beef daily.is it less or more.
Answer : Dear Kutty, I will be replying shortly to you Please bear Meeta
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Question by: vani
age 15yrs weight 53kgs height 163cm femalesuggest me a diet to grow taller i have difficulty in passing my stools and irregular periods. i even have pimples although i eat healthy veg food and drink lot of water i also tend to overeat homemade food
Answer : Dear Vani, I will be replying to you shortly in great detail. With best wishes Meeta
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Question by: vani
hello doc!! i am 15yrs weighg 54kg and am 162cm tall.i have difficulty in passing my tools and even have pimples on my forehead. moreover how do i grow tall. i avoid all the junk food but tend to overeat homemade food. i am also not able to indulge in physical activities. kindly suggest right food for me.
Answer : Dear Vani, I will be replying to you shortly in great detail. With best wishes Meeta
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Question by: NASAR
sex problem
Answer : Dear Nasar, Pls send your specific sex query to our expert Dr Narayan Meeta
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Question by: REENA
Hai,i am 39 years old.we are living in kuwait.after coming 4 years mu face become dark and red spot came in my face.mu son also has white patches in his face
Answer : Dear Reena, I think you need to consult a skin specialist (dermatologist) who can help you out. With best wishes, Meeta
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Question by: lakshman
Dear Madam, Im 32 and weighing less than 65 kgs. I just need to have good energizing food ie less cholesterol, less carbohydrate less salt etc. Though i lead a very active life i do not exercise much. All i need is advise on the food which is healthy for my body. Kindly advise me what to have at what time ie breakfast, lunch, dinner with regardsf
Answer : Dear Lakshman, Your weight seems to be within normal limits (assuming that you are at least 5'7" tall). Your diet should be pretty normal - three main meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) along with two small healthy snacks during the day. If you are maintaining your weight, then all that you are eating seems to be fine. In addition, here are some healthy eating tips for you: . Have regular meals. Skipping meals can lead to out-of-control hunger, often resulting in overeating. . Eat dinner early. Don't dine after nine. Try drinking a glass of warm milk before going to bed. . Include foods from all food groups - cereals, dairy products, meat/fish/chicken and vegetables/fruits - in each meal to get all the 40 different nutrients required for good health. . Snacking between meals can help curb hunger, but don't eat so much that your snack becomes an entire meal. Keep healthy snacks handy at home, in the office and in the car. . Don't overeat. At mealtimes, limit portion size. At buffets, don't sample everything. Learn to limit your choices to the healthiest few. . Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. . Limit fat and sugar intake by avoiding deep-fried foods and choosing healthier cooking methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid sodas and fruity drinks. . Reduce the amount salt added in cooking. For flavor, use herbs and spices like lemon juice, coriander, raw mango, tomatoes, garlic and oregano. . Also, remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces (soy sauce, tomato sauce, mustard, Tabasco, chilli sauce, etc) along with meals. . Avoid high-salt savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. Even though you are active, our body needs to be exercised regularly. Exercising builds muscle tone and keeps you fit. The earlier one takes it up, the better our old age will be. Even if you don't want to exercise much, start walking for at least 40 minutes 5 times a week. Once you start walking, it will become a part of your routine. Do try. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: K.Raghavendra
My wife Indira Kaiwar's recent test report is as follows(age58)Total cholesterol-244mg/dlHDL cholesterol-59mg/dlLDL cholesterol-163mg/dl(BP-OK)Please advise dietary.Raghavendra
Answer : Dear Raghavendra, Your wife's report shows that her total cholesterol level is high (the desirable level being < 200 mg/dl and borderline being 200 -239 mg/dl). More worrying is the fact that her LDL cholesterol level is High (160-189 mg/dl). Her HDL cholesterol level is normal. What she really needs is a diet which will bring down her LDL cholesterol and consequently, her total cholesterol levels. This is the first, and the most important, step in preventing heart disease. Fortunately, she does not have high blood pressure and/or diabetes. What about her weight? Is it normal? The first step in lowering blood cholesterol is foregoing cholesterol-rich foods. However, foods low in cholesterol may still be high in saturated fat or trans fat - other types of fats which raise cholesterol levels higher much more than cholesterol-rich foods. She should limit her fat intake to about 10 g a day - adding only a wee bit for cooking food eliminating all foods that contain saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. Avoid: . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras Instead, she should choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as mustard and olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). At the same time, she will need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Increase physical activity to at least 30-40 minutes on most days. Walking is the best exercise for her. . Cut down on sugar and salt intake considerably If she has been prescribed any cholesterol-reducing drugs, do check with your physician regarding their potential side effects in the long term. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Srinivas
I am 22 year old...i have lost 95 of my hair on my scalp...have shown to dermatologist..he says it is alopecia universalis...i obese weighing more than 115 kg...my hope is can i regain my hair if i reduce my weight and keep up good nutrition ...please suggest me good nutrition food for increasing hair.
Answer : Dear Srinivas, A young man like you needs to take extremely good care of his health. You first need to focus on losing weight. Obesity induces hair loss and needs to be corrected immediately. You have not mentioned your height; irrespective of this, you are definitely overweight by about 30-40 kgs and need to start losing weight today. However, weight loss is a complex process and should be done under expert guidance and supervision. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert in your area who will analyze your physical and biochemical profile in detail (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to change your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about the extreme weight loss. Some doctors may suggest treating your weight problem surgically. These surgical procedures - gastric bypass and gastroplasty - reduce the size and capacity of the stomach from bottle to small glass size. While these methods are successful in bringing about weight loss and have become increasingly popular in the West, experts caution that gastric bypass is major surgery and should not be undertaken lightly. I suggest that in consultation with your weight management expert, you work out a comprehensive plan which will include calorie restriction, exercise, lifestyle modification and psychological counseling. Also, try to involve your family members since this will ensure greater success in achieving the weight loss and further, maintaining it. As for the hair loss, there is no cure for alopecia and no universally proven therapy to induce hair re-growth and sustain remission. What does the dermatologist suggest? Try a hair growth expert who can work out a treatment plan for you. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: BABITHA
i'm an exercise freak, i do yoga in the morning and 45min walking on treadmill inthe evening almost 7 days a week . my height is 5'1and weight is 56kilo. i've doing this for a month but the weight is not reducing. i want to shed 2 more kilos. pls give me some advice. i'm a non veg , i eat chicken and egg twice a week, i love sweets which i had stopped eating , before i had even tried himalaya sliming capsules for a month.I'd like to know what to eat if i want to shed 2 more kilos .reply soon,BABITHA
Answer : Dear Babitha, Being an exercise freak is a great thing in modern times. Also, you have a great weight for height ratio (23.3) which is well within the acceptable range of 18.5 - 24.9. So why do you need to lose any weight at all? Achieving the ideal weight is not always desirable or possible. Also, since you are a disciplined exercise 'freak', it is likely that you have a high muscle to fat ratio - this is probably why you are not able to lose weight any further. I suggest that you stop worrying about your weight and focus on maintaining your diet and exercise pattern. Also, I never recommend any unusual methods for weight reduction such as capsules or powders or weight loss mixtures. And you in particular, have no need for such things at all! One more thing: you love sweets; why deprive yourself totally? Indulge yourself once in a while (once a week or a fortnight) and have a small portion of your favorite dessert. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sandra
i am betwwen 35 years olyears old female . my weight is between 46 and 48. my height is 5"1 i have three neals thats breakfast lunch and dinner i am a teacher who gout to give tutions.please recommend me how should my diet me
Answer : Dear Sandra, I think you have a figure which most women would envy. For a height of 5'1", a weight between 46 and 48 is better than ideal! In fact, though I don't recommend it, you could even do with putting on a couple of kilos. Continue doing all that you do. Since you have a moderately active lifestyle, I suggest you have a couple of healthy snacks in between your meals. This will rule out any gas problem or weakness. Some healthy snacks for you could be: . Sprouts (moong, moth, chana) chaat; . 8-10 almonds (or walnuts); . a fruit like apple/pear/guava or even a banana; . poha or upma; . dal chaat (cooked dal with onion/tomato/coriander etc); a glass of cold skim/low-fat milk; . plain (or salted) lassi with curry leaves; . chilled vegetable juice; . a fruit smoothie made with curd and the fruit of your choice (add a dash of vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg); . custard with fruits; . a bowl of crunchy fresh salad; and . if you are a non-vegetarian, one boiled egg or a whole wheat bread sandwich with vegetable/chicken filling. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: neeta
i am 67 years old female my height between 48 and 49 kgs my height 5:1. i have a blood pressure problem thats 80/130 somtimes 90?140 i am a vegetarian i go for yoga since 12 years i have three meals that is breakfast lunch and dinner. please reccmend or suggest me how should my daily diet me.
Answer : Dear Neetaji, The best part about your health is that your weight is ideal. The fact that you are vegetarian and have been doing yoga for such a long time may explain even why your blood pressure problem is not critical. At your age, a blood pressure of 130/80 or even 140/90 is pretty much within control. You can control it even further by controlling the intake of salt and also sugar. Otherwise, three meals a day is fine for your age. Try to keep the quantity of food less at meal times so as not to overload your system. Add on a couple of healthy snacks in-between meals. To control your intake of salt, you will need to: . Reduce the amount salt added in cooking. For flavor, use herbs and spices like lemon juice, coriander, raw mango, tomatoes, garlic and oregano. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces (soy sauce, tomato sauce, mustard, Tabasco, chilli sauce, etc) along with meals. . Avoid high-salt savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Avoid fast foods and restaurant food. . Avoid processed foods like cornflakes, bread, cheese, salted butter, biscuits, cookies, cakes, ready-to-cook vegetables/soups, canned vegetables/fruits, salad dressings and packaged fruit juices/drinks. Colas are high in sodium - avoid. . Antacids are high in sodium, do not take them. . Read labels to figure out the amount of sodium added in the form of baking powder, baking soda and preservatives like brine, sodium benzoate, monosodium glutamate or ajinomoto, sodium benzoate, etc. To control your intake of sugar, you should: . Avoid sugar in your daily diet. Since you do not have diabetes, you may indulge occasionally in a sweet or dessert. . Avoid starchy vegetables -- including potatoes, sweet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi) and raw bananas. . Prefer low sugar fruits such as apple, orange, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) instead of the high sugar mangoes, bananas, chikoo, and leechis as well fruit juices and colas. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: aditya
hello maam this is aditya.first of all i must thank u for the advice.now iam following a regular balanced diet and i lost 26 kgs.my only problem is abdominal distension.iam doing regular excersises but there is no use.presently i am using dulcolax but it is not working efficiently.please specify a good drug for contipation.thanking u.
Answer : Dear Aditya, I hope you got my earlier reply. Meeta
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Question by: aditya
hello Maam,this is aditya again first of all i must thank u for giving me de advice.now i am folllowing a regualar diet and exercise totallly i lost 26 kgs.now i am 79.but my only problem is abdominal distension though i am eating enough fibre.i am using dulcolax but in vain.please suggest me a good drug and tips for maintaining de weight. urs sincerely adity
Answer : Dear Aditya, It is great to learn that you have achieved a stupendous weight loss of 26 kilos! Keep it up!! Now for your distension problem. Using laxatives to relieve constipation makes the bowels dependent upon them so it is better not to use them at all. Instead, add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. Try soaking 10-15 black raisins (monacca) or 3-4 figs in warm water at night and eating them in the morning along with the water. As far as maintaining your reduced weight is concerned, continue doing all that you have been following. Most dieters who lose weight become a bit too comfortable as they achieve their target weight and reward themselves by indulging again in forbidden foods. Beware of such a self-defeating trap! At the same time, research also shows that the people who sustain their weight loss who are the highly motivated and self-dieters such as yourself. So keep up the good work! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: raja
hai ,iam raja ,my age is 24.my weight is 103.i want to reduce my weight.what kind of food i ll eat.what are all the exercise i ll do.
Answer : Dear Raja, A young man like you needs to take extremely good care of his health. You have not mentioned your height; irrespective of this, you are definitely overweight by about 25 - 30 kgs and need to start losing weight today. However, weight loss is a complex process and should be done under expert guidance and supervision. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert in your area who will analyze your physical and biochemical profile in detail (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to change your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about the extreme weight loss. Some doctors may suggest treating your weight problem surgically. These surgical procedures - gastric bypass and gastroplasty - reduce the size and capacity of the stomach from bottle to small glass size. While these methods are successful in bringing about weight loss and have become increasingly popular in the West, experts caution that gastric bypass is major surgery and should not be undertaken lightly. I suggest that in consultation with your weight management expert, you work out a comprehensive plan which will include calorie restriction, exercise, lifestyle modification and psychological counseling. Also, try to involve your family members since this will ensure greater success in achieving the weight loss and further, maintaining it. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: mereena
Iam a 31yr old woman.Iam always experiencing very bad gas problems. I don't know what kind of food will help me overcome my problems. I'm not able to enjoy sex because of this.
Answer : Dear Mereena, When you say you have a gas problem, what exactly do you mean? Do you belch a lot, pass a lot of gas from the rectum (flatulence) or feel bloated after eating,? Or is it a combination of all of these? If you belch a lot, this is nothing serious. It is just the release of air swallowed by us during eating and drinking. So you need to consciously reduce the number of times you swallow air. Eat slowly. Also avoid fizzy drinks like coke etc. If you pass a lot of rectal gas (flatulence), then this can be easily controlled by reducing the carbohydrate and sugar content in your diet. Both these foods encourage gas forming bacteria to thrive in the intestine. Experience also tells us that all pulses, milk and milk products, some vegetables (cabbage, cauliflower, onion, radish, turnip, cucumber, fried foods etc), colas and drinking too much tea and coffee also cause gas. Eliminate or decrease these foods one by one and see the effect on reducing gas. Many people complain that adding fiber to the diet causes gas. This problem can usually be reduced by adding fiber gradually over a period of several weeks. Abdominal bloating after eating occurs more often in women. It usually occurs when the contractions of the stomach and upper intestine are not coordinated. Stress and anxiety, upset tummy, eating rapidly as well as medical conditions like irritable bowel syndrome may cause this bloating. Since your gas problem is affecting your normal life, it is best that you consult a physician who will identify the cause of bloating and then suggest appropriate measures to reduce it. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: marie
what are the vegetables available in Tamil Nadu and helpful in a diet aiming at weight reduction.how to have a vegetatian diet without dropping the hg?
Answer : Dear Marie, Most vegetables - green leafy vegetables and also other vegetables - are good for weight loss. However, potatoes, sweeet potato (shakarkandi), colocasia (arbi), yam (jimikand) amd banana stem are full of carbohydrates and should not be counted as vegetables at all. Avoid these vegetables totally if you are trying to lose weight. In all, 4 exchanges of vegetables (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori of cooked vegetable) are recommended in any weight loss program. In addition, two exchanges of low-sugar fruits such as guava, apple, pear, water melon and musk melon (kharbooja) are also recommended. As far as hemoglobin levels are concerned, very few vegetarian foods provide iron. Jaggery, lotus stem and green leafy vegetables are good sources of iron; however, very little of their iron content is actually absorbed into our body. It is best if vegetarians, especially women, consume some or the other iron supplement in the form of tablet or syrup. Do consult your doctor for the same. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nisha
Hi Meeta, I'm 23. My height is 5' and I weigh 59Kg.I believe I'm over weight. Please advice what is the cut off weight to which I need to reduce. I have one more query, every time when I start following strict diet instead of my body my face looses charm - I get dark circles under my eyes and also loose glow on my face. Recently I have started going to aerobics, but facing the same problem even after having enough fruits and veggie and also I drink lot of water everyday. Please advice what do I do?
Answer : Dear Nisha, Yes, you are overweight. Although your ideal weight should be 48, even losing 5 kgs will bring your BMI in the acceptable range of 18.5 - 24.9. And yes, strict dieting does affect the glow on your face. What you really need to do is start eating a balanced diet (which contains all the food groups) which will also bring about weight loss and combine it with a regular exercise routine. It may be better if you consult a weight loss expert in your area who will analyze your body type and profile and then suggest modifications in your diet and activity. I suggest a 1200 calories diet for you which should include: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) If you eat fast foods or fried foods (including namkeens, chips etc) and sugary drinks (colas and fruit juices), cut down on them completely. While your aerobics class will do you good, take up walking 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week, an activity you can continue all through life. Yoga and strength training are other good exercises which you can combine with the walking after your aerobics classes are over. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: meera
what is the way to protect the bones after 40's to women.
Answer : Dear Meera, Dear Meera, From the mid 30s onwards, bones start losing their calcium and protein content. With menopause, the bone loss further accelerates and is the maximum for the next 3 years. Women usually develop osteoporosis (loss of bone strength resulting in fragile bones which are more likely to break) after menopause. However, we can prevent or slow down the process of osteoporosis with good bone health in the early years. "X Be physically active throughout life. Just like muscles, bones need physical activity to gain strength. Both weight-bearing (walking, running, jumping, playing tennis/badminton, dancing) and strength training (weight lifting) exercises are great for building bone strength. "X Take a regular dose of calcium especially after menopause. Increase the consumption of calcium-rich foods (milk and milk products, soybean, tofu, almonds, broccoli, turnip leaves. Take a calcium supplement about 1000mg per day. "X Vitamin D helps our bones to utilize calcium. Since vitamin D is made by our skin on exposure to sunlight, Indian women usually do not suffer form a deficiency of vitamin D. "X If you smoke, give it up completely as smoking accelerates bone loss. "X Short term hormone therapy after menopause helps in slowing down osteoporosis. Discuss this option with your doctor so that an informed decision can be made. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: meera
1 how can we keep our body healthy ?
Answer : Dear Meera, I hope you received my earlier reply Meeta
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Question by: meera
how to control my diet
Answer : Dear Meera, Both your questions are pretty general, so my reply will also be pretty general. We can keep our body healthy by maintaining a weight which is appropriate for our height. At the same time, striking a healthy balance between the food we eat (the energy which goes in) and our activity pattern (the energy which comes out). When you say control my diet, I assume that you mean how to keep food intake optimal. The key to healthy eating is a combination of balance, variety and moderation. Follow these tips to break bad eating habits and inculcate good healthy ones. Do's 1. Eat small, frequent meals during the day. Eating 4-5 smaller meals rather than 2 or 3 big ones keeps us energized through the day and our hunger never goes out of control. Also, there are never excess calories available for storage as fat. 2. Have regular meals. Skipping meals can lead to out-of-control hunger, often resulting in overeating. When you're very hungry, it's also tempting to forget about good nutrition. Snacking between meals can help curb hunger, but don't eat so much that your snack becomes an entire meal. 3. Balance your food choices - don't eat too much of any one thing. Include foods from all food groups - cereals, dairy products, meat/fish/chicken and vegetables/fruits - in each meal to get all the 40 different nutrients required for good health. 4. Balance your food choices over time. Not every food has to be "perfect." When eating a food high in fat, salt or sugar, select other foods that are low in these ingredients. If you miss out on any food group one day, make up for it the next. Your food choices over several days should fit together into a healthy pattern. 5. Make changes gradually. Just as there are no "superfoods" or easy answers to a healthy diet, don't expect to totally revamp your eating habits overnight. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. 6. Remember, foods are not good or bad. Select foods based on your total eating patterns, not whether any individual food is "good" or "bad." Don't feel guilty if you love foods such as apple pie, potato chips, candy bars or ice cream. Eat them in moderation, and choose other foods to provide the balance and variety that are vital to good health. 7. Keep healthy snacks handy. Keep a selection of tasty yet nutritious snacks at home, in the office and in the car. Don't hesitate to snack in-between meals. Snacks refuel and keep you going till the next meal. They prevent bingeing at meal times. 8. Eat slowly. Eating slowly allows for better digestion and prevents you eating more than is required. It also allows you to stop eating before you become overfull. 9. Exercise more. Exercising is a great way to burn excess calories. Even increasing physical activity by just 30 minutes a day has the same improvement in fitness, blood pressure and body fat as does exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes, 5 days a week! 10. Maintain a food diary. To improve your eating habits, you first have to know what's wrong with them. Write down everything you eat for three days. Then check your list according to the rest of these tips. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. The diary will also help understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. Don'ts 1. Don't put serving dishes on the table. Serve up plates in the kitchen so that will think twice before going in for second or third helpings. 2. Don't skip meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs that can cause food cravings and/or bingeing. 3. Don't sample everything on the buffet table or at any get-together. Learn to limit your choices to the healthiest few. 4. Don't overeat. At mealtimes, limit portion size. 5. don't eat too many times during the day. At other times, before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. 6. Don't clean your kid's plates or your spouse's or even the small leftovers. Stop when you are comfortably full but not overly full. That's the time to stop eating, whether there's food still left on the plate or not. 7. Don't go on a diet. Dieting - or eating less food than one is used to - results in hunger. Deprivation makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. 8. Don't weigh yourself every day. Taking weight does not tell us whether we are losing water or the culprit, that is, body fat. Weigh yourself once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 9. Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. 10. Limit fat and sugar intake by avoiding deep-fried foods and choosing healthier cooking methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid sodas and fruity drinks. Serve water and milk (without added sugar) instead. 11. Reduce fast food and other low-nutrient snacks, such as chips and candy. But don't completely ban favorite snacks from your home. Instead, make them "once-in-a-while" foods, so your child doesn't feel deprived. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pani
my wife is piles patient.now she is taking pirox capsule.can you help for good?
Answer : Dear Pani, The main cause of piles is chronic constipation. When one strains to evacuate constipated bowels, the pressure caused on the surrounding veins leads to piles. Treating chronic constipation is the only way to get rid of the trouble. First of all, your wife needs to eat a high fiber diet which will keep the stool large, soft, bulky which passes through the bowel more easily and quickly. Fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and pulses are ideal sources of fiber. Include lots of them in your diet everyday. Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges, pears and pomegranates are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Using laxatives to relieve constipation makes the bowels dependent upon them. Do not use laxatives at all. Instead, add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. Your wife may try soaking 10-15 black raisins (monacca) or 3-4 figs in warm water at night and eating them in the morning along with the water. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sion
my age is 32,married.i am not getting hungry to eat food.so i am becoming very thin.i want to become fat.please help me to get good suggetion.
Answer : Dear Sion, You have not mentioned your weight and height so it is difficult to figure out how much underweight you are. Nevertheless, I assume that you do need to put on weight but remember, the weight you gain should be a healthy combination of muscle and fat. Putting on weight is rather easy for most people. I suggest that you increase your daily food intake by about 400-500 calories. Since you are not hungry at meal times, it may be difficult for you to increase the portion size of your meals. You need to eat foods which are concentrated sources of nutrients and at the same time, healthy - include more cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses, lean meats like chicken and fish, nuts and seeds, raisins/dates, fresh fruit juices and energy-dense fruits such as banana, mango, cheekoo in your diet. Eat 5-6 small meals - three main meals along with 2 snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime - regularly. Do not skip any meal. But increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. Remember: . Eat at meal times even if you are not hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. This will also ensure that the weight you put is the desirable muscle mass and not extra fat. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: aaditi
mam, i am 28 year old, and have one baby before 2 and 1/2 years. before six months i was on 60 kg, but when i stopped breast feedin n join my duties i pot on 15 kgs within 6 months.....i am very upset as my figure become yuck......... pliz give some diat plan as i might get in shape again. i never bother for such figure before but as now i am working with good company n everybody wear jean n modern clothes , i feel very sorry for my figure. previously i used to wear those clothes, even till past 6 months i wore that but now its impossible for me, n feeling depresed. pliz help me.
Answer : Dear Aaditi, Looks are not the only reason to worry about excess weight ¡V obesity is a hazard for your overall health ¡V now and more importantly, in later life. But feeling sorry for yourself and depression are not going to help ¡V what you need to do is take your health in your hands. You say that you have put on 15 kgs in the last six months. What do you think could have been the reason for this? Was it that your life is now totally sedentary? Or your food pattern has suddenly changed? To rule out any medical problem (such as a thyroid problem), I suggest you first go to your physician and get a checkup done. Once all is clear, the next step will be to start a weight loss program as soon as possible. Note that the weight loss program will need to combine changes both in your diet as well as activity patterns. Weight loss without regular exercise is difficult and also, undesirable. You have not mentioned your height, so it is difficult to figure out how much overweight you actually are. Do write back. In the meantime, cut down on all foods that are: "X oily ¡V fried foods, fast food, vegetables cooked in lots of oil, paranthas, namkeens, chips, cheese and nuts "X sweet ¡V sugar as well as all desserts, mithai as well as fruit juices and colas. Even fruits like banana, mango and cheekoo are loaded with sugar. "X made from refined carbohydrates ¡V naan, bhaturas, bread, buns, soup sticks, etc Continue eating food routinely cooked in the household but do try to control portion size ¡V this will slowly reduce the capacity of your stomach and is the first step towards weight loss. At the same time, start a regular exercise program. Start walking: 40 minutes 5 times a week will do wonders to begin with. Once you get used to this, increase the walking time to 50 minutes as well as the walking speed. Or you may supplement your 40 minute walk with vigorous exercise like cycling, swimming, jogging, playing tennis/badminton, dancing for at least 45 minutes twice a week. Join a yoga class if you can. If you don¡¦t have much time for exercise, buy a pair of weights and take up strength training at home (you can always consult an expert or refer to magazines/newspapers/internet on how to go about it). Become more active around the house and the office. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Ramakrishnan
Madam,I am a veggie. I am 5ft 7 inches tall, weighing 71 Kgs. Please suggest me a suitable diet to follow in order to reduce weight and maintain the correct BMI. As i have applied for Armed forces selection, i am very particular about maintaining a good and healthy physique. Kindly suggest me the suitable diet to follow.Thanks,Ramakrishnan
Answer : Dear Ramakrishnan, You are slightly overweight by about 7 kgs. Your BMI is 24.6 which is within the normal BMI range of 18.5 - 24.9. However, you could do with some weight loss. Even if you don't lose 7 kgs, losing 3-4 kgs will bring you further into the safe range of BMI. To bring about slow and steady weight loss, your diet should provide about 1500 calories and can include: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2-3 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Skim milk - 3-4 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/honey - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon). If you like, you can totally avoid sugar. Go in for a light dessert (custard, Phirni, jelly) once a week. In addition to the diet, you should exercise regularly. A combination of cardiovascular exercise (walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash), strength training (exercising with weights) and stretch exercises (yoga). Try to do the cardiovascular exercise for at least 40 minutes 4-5 times a week; strength training for about 20 minutes 3 times a week and stretch exercises for about 10-15 minutes twice a week. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: K.V.Balakrishnan
I request you to give some inputs on type of oil to be used.Being a Tamil, we use gingelly oil at home. Shall we use - coconut oil or sunflower / vegetable oil?From various sources - newspaper/magazines, we get varied inputs and its confusing.Pls give us your suggestion. Thank you.
Answer : Dear Balakrishnan, The variety of cooking oils and fats available today in the market and the claims made by their ads are, at best, confusing. On one side are the traditional desi ghee, mustard oil, coconut oil and gingelly (or sesame or til) oil. Besides vanaspati and groundnut oil, there are all kinds of vegetable oils ranging from sunflower, safflower, corn, canola, soybean, cottonseed and palm to various blends. Olive oil is the latest 'foreign' oil which has excited the health-conscious. Also, one has heard so much about the bad fats, the good omega-3s, mono- fats, poly-unsaturated fats, trans fats and so on .that a question like "Which is the best oil for cooking?" is very relevant. Let us begin at the beginning. First, cooking oil is pure fat obtained from plants or animals. One gram of any cooking oil provides about 9 calories irrespective of its origin. So fat is fat and will make you fat even if you only eat the best and most expensive one! Second, all cooking oils are made up of a combination of fatty acids such as the saturated fatty acids, mono-unsaturated fatty acids and poly-unsaturated fatty acids. It is the proportion of these different fatty acids in the oil which makes it healthy or not. All animal fats - desi ghee, butter, lard - contain high amounts of saturated fatty acids and cholesterol and thus, are a definite no-no for health. Palm oil and coconut oil are also very high in saturated fats and should be totally avoided. Remember, vegetable oils do not contain any cholesterol at all. Only animal fats like desi ghee and butter contain cholesterol - so ads which proclaim that their vegetable oil is "cholesterol free" are meaningless. Now, mono-unsaturated fatty acids are good because they reduce total blood cholesterol and the "bad" (LDL) cholesterol without affecting the "good" (HDL) cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are also good as they too reduce total cholesterol and LDL, but we now know they also decrease the positive effects of the good cholesterol. The oil that we use for cooking should thus be low in saturated fats, high in mono-unsaturated fats and reasonably low in poly-unsaturated fats. Mustard oil, canola oil, olive oil and groundnut oil have the best combination of the good and bad fatty acids. Gingelly oil is another excellent oil in this regard. Soybean, corn, sunflower and safflower oils are also good oils having low saturated fatty acid content; however, the poly-unsaturated fatty acid content is much higher than the mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Now, which oil is best for frying? The high heat during frying decomposes or breaks down the oil producing cancerous substances. The best oil for frying is thus one which can withstand the high temperature without foaming and smoking. Groundnut and gingelly oil are especially good for frying. All said and done, the best bet is to use a variety of oils judiciously. Use mustard, sesame, canola or olive oil (extra light or refined) for cooking; groundnut oil for frying; and olive oil (extra virgin) for salads and pasta. But remember, most of us need to curb the total amount of fat in our diet. So with cooking oil, less is more. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Dr.Rajdeep
I would like to consult you for my son, who is 17yr,6ft.1inch and weight around 92kg.I am resident of Delhi.Kindly provide me your clinic address.Thanks and RegardsDr.R.Srivastava
Answer : Dear Dr Srivastava, I do not have a clinic as such. I work from home. You are most welcome to call me at 95-129-4116528 for any questions or send them through THE WEEK With regards Meeta Lall
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Question by: jagathh
what is the function of thyroid gland?how can i reduce my tyroxine tablets?
Answer : Dear Jagathh, The thyroid gland takes up iodine from foods (iodized salt and sea foods) and converts it into the thyroid hormones: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). These hormones control our entire metabolism (or in simple words, the burning of calories along with oxygen to provide energy). When the thyroid is unable to produce the thyroid hormones in the required amounts (due to iodine deficiency, after delivery, genetic factors, AIDS, etc), the balance of chemical reactions in our body is disturbed. This condition is known as hypothyroidism. Fortunately, synthetic thyroid hormones given orally (thyroxine tablets) can easily replace the natural hormones made by the thyroid and usually reverse the symptoms of hypothyroidism. These thyroxine tablets need to be taken throughout life. Periodically checking the thyroid hormone levels every 3 months in consultation with a thyroid expert determines any change in the dosage. It is not possible to reduce or change the dosage on our own. Along with medicine, dietary choices are equally important for your thyroid problem. Foods containing goitrogens - chemicals which may worsen the thyroid disorder - are specifically to be avoided: soy (soybeans and all soy products such as soy milk, soy flour, nutrinuggets, and tofu), broccoli, radishes, turnips, spinach, mustard greens, cabbage and cauliflower. Although cooking these foods may reduce the effect, it is better to avoid them totally. Since hypothyroidism is usually linked with weight gain, check your weight regularly. Eat mini meals spread out through the day rather than three larger meals. This will balance the slow metabolism due to hypothyroidism. Just remember, keep these meals small, around 300 calories each, and include exercise. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: K.Bhaskara
about 6 months back i had a operation for replacement of theigh ball and housing.i am 62 years old/ht.5'10" and wt about 75 kgs.i want to reduce my stomach cercumferrence.since i had the operation i can not do any ex.for reducing/like bendding etc.by food habits can reduce my st.cercuferrence.
Answer : Dear Mr. Rao, Your BMI is 23.7 (BMI or the Body Mass Index is a measure of weight for height) which is well within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. So, considering your age, I do not feel you need to worry too much about losing weight - your focus instead should be on preventing any further weight gain. You have not mentioned your waist circumference - but if you feel you have excess fat on the tummy, you do need to reduce this since tummy fat is a health risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the abdomen. A waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor in men. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. Since it is now almost six months after your operation, you can check with your orthopaedic surgeon if you can start walking. Routine walks for at least 30 minutes a day 4-5 times a week will help you very much. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: vivek
I am 130 kg.Pl can u suggest what to eat in b'fast,lunch,dinner which can help me reduce?And what to avoid?I am 45,a pure veg,not even egg,blood group A ,life-style totally sedentary.All fat is on the tummy only.Many thanks
Answer : Dear Vivek, Even when I do not know your height, a weight of 130 kg is definitely way too high. This in combination with fat on the belly and a sedentary lifestyle is a great health risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. There is urgent need to bring down your weight as much as possible. However, weight loss is a complex process and should be done under expert guidance and supervision. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert in your area who will analyze your physical and biochemical profile in detail (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to change your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about the extreme weight loss. Some doctors may suggest treating your weight problem surgically. These surgical procedures - gastric bypass and gastroplasty - reduce the size and capacity of the stomach from bottle to small glass size. While these methods are successful in bringing about weight loss and have become increasingly popular in the West, experts caution that gastric bypass is major surgery and should not be undertaken lightly. I suggest that in consultation with your weight management expert, you work out a comprehensive plan which will include calorie restriction, exercise, lifestyle modification and psychological counseling. Also, try to involve your family members since this will ensure greater success in achieving the weight loss and further, maintaining it. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Nishyanth
Dear Madam,I'm 22/M. I'm a resident of Mysore. I'm grossly overweight. Doctor advised me to do strenous exercise to reduce weight. I also want to increase height if possible. Since I have many many queries, could you suggest to me any good nutritionist at Mysore. -Thanks
Answer : Dear Nishyanth, Since I do not know your height and weight as also your lifestyle, it will be difficult to suggest exactly what changes need to be made in your diet and exercise pattern. Yes, your idea of going to a nutritionist in Mysore is very good. Why not ask your doctor if he can recommend a good nutritionist? Or check with the local hospitals? Perhaps the talking yellow pages can be helpful? Do not try exercising heavily on your own - enroll in a gym so that you can exercise under expert guidance. What you can start immediately is a brisk walk for 45 minutes to an hour 4-5 times a week. This will start toning your body muscles and yes, also bring some shape to your body. At the gym, focus on strength training since this will build muscle - this will ensure that you burn calories even when you sleep. Now regarding your height: It is generally accepted that there is a certain age at which most people usually stop growing: men by the age of 25 and women by the age of 21 years. Since you are only 22 years old, there is some scope for further increase in your height. Since it will be difficult to fit all suggestions for increasing height in this column, I suggest you look up the website http://www.giantscientific.com/. This site gives credible information on natural ways of increasing height by a combination of exercises (mostly stretches targeting three areas: spine, knees, and thighbones), techniques (such as Pilates, or Tai Chi), supplements (calcium, vitamin D, glucosamine/chondroitin, multi-vitamin) and equipment. But do check with your doctor before you start on anything new - be it supplements or exercise. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: shereena
1.my son is 15 months old now.what all things i should include in his diet.i am still breastfeeding him.
Answer : Dear Shereena, By the age of 15 months, a child usually starts eating most of the foods cooked in the household. Is your son eating routinely-cooked food yet? Remember, you need to be very patient, resourceful and not too serious. Your skill and ingenuity can guide your baby to eat and enjoy healthy foods right from the very beginning. Ideally, a good balanced diet for your baby should include: Cereals - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 2 biscuits /1 small plate rice/ 20 g suji/breakfast cereal/ready-to-eat cereal) Pulses - 1 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg). If vegetarian, substitute meat exchange with 1 exchange of pulse or milk Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Roots & tubers - ½ exchange ((1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Green leafy vegetables - ½ exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 1/2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) But there is no hard and fast rule - if your child is unable to eat all these foods during the day, there is no need to panic. Since the baby's stomach is small, give small, energy-rich meals every 3 hours - this means about 5-6 meals in a day. Keep easy to give foods like fruits, biscuits and other homemade snacks - matthis, shakkarparas, etc - can be given. Also: . Offer only one new food at a time. Give it for a few days continuously until the baby learns to like it. Give small quantities of the food. . If a particularly food is persistently refused or disliked for no apparent reason, do not force it on the baby. Try giving the food after a few days. Tastes change and the baby may like the food later. . New foods should be given separately rather than in mixtures so that the baby becomes acquainted with the taste of each individual food. . A baby's appetite varies from meal to meal and day to day. Let the baby eat larger or smaller amounts on some days. . Do not force-feed - it can lead to vomiting. . Do not give too many colas, chocolates, ice creams or other fast foods to the baby - it sets the trend for bad food habits in life. . Give plenty of water particularly in hot weather. Small amounts of boiled, cooled water should be given 2-3 times a day and after meals. . Do not leave the baby's food standing for hours. Germs may grow in it which can make the child ill. . Do not give all the suggested foods together; this may make the baby overweight. Remember, the frequency of breastfeeding should be suitably reduced as the baby accepts more and more food. . Provide food for the brain. Talk and play with your baby, show your love, and be attentive. Praise and recognize the baby's efforts in learning to sit, crawl, walk and talk. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anand
Dear Doctor,I am 24 years old, 5' 8" tall and just below 50 Kg.I am free from every kind of problem and tensions, except weight.I dont smoke, niether consume alchohol.My immediate course of action is to gain weight, what should i take in my daily diet to gain weight as soon as possible. regards,Anand.
Answer : Dear Anand, For your height, you need to weigh at least 60 kg (your ideal weight should be 65 kg). But this should not be a cause for concern since it is usually easy to put on weight! But first, you need to rule out any medical problem so I suggest you consult a general physician. Once you know that all is well, the next step will be to add on foods to whatever you are eating daily - this will create a positive balance of calories in your body. All this extra food (or calories) will then be packed into your muscles (preferably) and fat stores (preferably to only some extent) so that you gain weight and more importantly, healthy weight. Since I do not know your current diet and lifestyle pattern, I suggest that you increase your daily intake by about 500 to 1000 calories. Make sure that you include adequate proteins in your diet. So while you have the liberty of eating foods high in refined carbohydrates, fat and sugar (chocolates, pastries, cakes, jam, ice creams, pizzas, burgers and sandwiches), you will need to balance these with healthy foods like cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses, lean meats like chicken and fish, nuts and seeds, raisins/dates, fresh fruit juices and energy-dense fruits such as banana, mango, cheekoo which are usually forbidden otherwise. You may add on these foods to your regular meals or as snacks in-between meals. Remember: . Increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. . Eat 5-6 small meals regularly. Have snacks in-between meals and a glass of milk with biscuits at bedtime. Do not skip any meal. . Eat at meal times even if you are not hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. In addition to eating more, become more active. To build muscle tone, it is essential to combine a healthy diet with plenty of exercise. Although exercising burns calories, it also builds appetite and helps the body digest and utilize the food well. Take up walking for at least 5-6 days in a week. Since you are a young man, take up some vigorous exercise in the form of badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling at least twice a week. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: kalaivani
what diet can i take for hypothyroidism?which food i have to avoid?
Answer : Dear Kalaivani, The diet for hypothyroidism is pretty much a normal diet. However, you will need to avoid foods containing goitrogens which are chemicals that may worsen the thyroid disorder. Such foods include soy (soybeans and all soy products such as soy milk, soy flour, nutrinuggets, and tofu), broccoli, radishes, turnips, spinach, mustard greens, cabbage and cauliflower. Although cooking these foods does reduce their effect, it is better to avoid them totally. Since hypothyroidism is usually linked with weight gain, check your weight regularly. Eat mini meals spread out through the day rather than three larger meals. This will balance the slow metabolism due to hypothyroidism. Just remember, keep these meals small, around 300 calories each, and include exercise. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: swetha
i am 23/f . is there a chance to improve my height now ?? i am 4'11''.I am very upset about this.
Answer : Dear Swetha, Height is a sensitive issue in most societies but do you really feel that your happiness depends on your height? Think about it. It is generally accepted that there is a certain age at which most people usually stop growing: men by the age of 25 and women unto the age of 21 years. While our genes do preprogram our adult height, diet and environment also contribute significantly. I found many sites on the web which assure a natural increase in height by a combination of exercises (mostly stretches targeting three areas: spine, knees, and thighbones), techniques (such as Pilates, or Tai Chi), supplements (calcium, vitamin D, glucosamine/chondroitin, multi-vitamin) and equipment. One particular website seemed quite credible: http://www.giantscientific.com/. Since there is too much good quality information on this site to present in an effective manner in this answer, I recommend you look here first for information on increasing height. But do check with your doctor before you start on anything new - be it supplements or exercise. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Tony
am working in an bpo.i stay alone.i do night shift.and i feel tired soon.wat type of food do u suggest for me
Answer : Dear Tony, You need adequate fueling for working at night. Before starting work, have a full dinner around 6:30 - 7:00 pm. But don't overload your stomach with high carbohydrate foods (dishes prepared with refined flours like bhatura, naan, pizza, burgers, etc and desserts/mithai) and fatty foods (fried foods, oily/creamy gravies, red meat, whole milk preparations etc). These will overload your stomach and make you sleepy through the night. Although you stay alone, it may be worthwhile to cook a substantial dinner for yourself rather than eating out. Your dinner should include all the food groups: cereal (3 exchanges or 3 medium chapatis/1½ plate rice), pulse/meat (1 exchange or one katori dal/ two pieces of chicken/fish), vegetables (1-2 exchanges or 1 small dish salad and one small katori vegetable preparation), fruit (1 exchange or 1 medium size fruit) and fat (2 exchanges or 10 g). If you are unable to organize so many dishes yourself, you can simply prepare wholesome chicken/egg/cheese sandwiches with a fruit and a glass of milk. Such a dinner will keep you going through the night. You may also include a couple of snacks during the night along with your tea breaks - around 12 pm and 4 pm. Idli/vada, biscuits, poha/upma and other light foods make great snacks while working. Avoid fried stuff totally. Also, take up some regular exercise. I usually recommend walking for 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week along with strength training (exercising with weights) or yoga for 15 minutes 3 times a week. You may find walking a problem since you would be sleeping in the morning and preparing for work (and dinner) in the evening. Why not buy a treadmill so that you can work out after a good sleep in the morning or any other time during the day? You can do the yoga before dinner in the evening - it will set the mood for great work during the night. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: raghav
hlo ma'am,I am a 14 years old IX class student,I have a lot of physical exercise daily(football for 2 hrs-1 in morning,1 in evening).what worries me is that almost every 1 and half month I get throaght congestion followed by fever,mostly.I have a healthy diet and avoid outside food.What can be the reason for this?
Answer : Dear Raghav, Keep up the physical activity - it is good for you and will build up your muscles for good. Your throat congestion and fever has nothing, I feel, to do with your playing football or your diet. these are infections which are usually around us all the time. It is just that you seem to be more prone to getting them. So treat the infection episode-wise. You may also check with your doctor as to what kind of infection it is and its reason. With best wishes, Meeta
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Question by: nids
hi doci m 5.3' weight 60 ,please tell me how to loose these extra 4 kgs .please guide me
Answer : Dear Nidhi, Why are you worried about your weight? Yes, as per ideal weight calculations, your weight should be 55 kgs. However, your weight to height ratio (that is, your Body Mass Index or BMI) is 23.4 which is well within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. Remember, it is not always possible (and not really desirable) to achieve a perfect weight. Instead what you really need to do is to make sure that you maintain this acceptable weight of 60 kg and prevent any further weight gain. For this, exercise regularly and become more active in general (take the stairs instead of the elevator, park further than you need to and start doing household chores and so on.). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Sanjivani
Hello Madam,Mostly people ask the question " how to lose weight" , but I have a question " how to Gain weight". I am 30 yrs. old and a mother of one child(one and half yr. old). I still do breast-feeding for my child.
Answer : Dear Sanjivani, Although I do not know your weight and height, I assume that you are quite serious abut gaining weight. Since I do not know your current diet and lifestyle pattern, I suggest that you increase your daily intake by about 500 to 1000 calories. This will also take care of your additional food needs due to breastfeeding. But remember, the weight you gain should be a healthy combination of muscle and fat. Make sure that you include adequate proteins in your diet. So while you have the liberty of eating foods high in refined carbohydrates, fat and sugar (chocolates, pastries, cakes, jam, ice creams, pizzas, burgers and sandwiches), you will need to balance these with healthy foods like cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses, lean meats like chicken and fish, nuts and seeds, raisins/dates, fresh fruit juices and energy-dense fruits such as banana, mango, cheekoo which are usually forbidden otherwise. You may add on these foods to your regular meals or as snacks in-between meals. Remember: . Increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. . Eat 5-6 meals - three main meals along with 2 snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime - regularly. Do not skip any meal. . Eat at meal times even if you are not hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. . Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: SALIM
MY SON IS NEARLY FIVE BUT FR THE BEGINING HIS EATING HABIT IS VERYLITTLE. MY WIFE HAS TO FORCE HIM TO EAT, IT TAKES NEARLY 1 TO 1 1/2 hr FOR TO EAT. IF WE DO NOT FEED HIM HE IS LEAST BOTHERED. FOR THIS HE IS ONLY WEIGHT 4.5 KGS WHICH FOR IS AGE IS VERY LITTLE.OTHERWISE HI IS OK INTELLEGENT. WE ARE VERY MUCH WORRIED FOR HIM. PLS SUGGEST SOME FOOD WHICH WE CAN GIVE AND INCREASE HIS WIEGHT.FOR A POSISTIVE REPLYTHANKSSALIM
Answer : Dear Salim, I think you have inadvertently mistyped your son's weight: if it is 4.5 kg, then please consult a pediatrician. I think it is 14.5 kgs, is that so? First of all, stop worrying about your child not eating food. When I went to a famous pediatrician with the same problem for my daughter, he asked me, "Have you ever heard of a child starving himself to death?" Growth during childhood slows down after the first two years and the child's appetite is much lesser. The child is more interested in interacting with the outside world. At this age, children develop food jags: refusing previously accepted foods or asking for the same food at each meal. Like you, most parents keep worrying about the adequacy of their child's diet and are frustrated with their child's seemingly irrational food behavior. Follow these 5 golden rules in feeding a preschooler. Rule 1: No child can be forced to eat. Offer your son a variety of foods including his favorite foods. But do not battle with him over food. Remember, this period is temporary. Rule 2: Give small, frequent meals Preschoolers have small stomachs. Offer 1 tablespoon of each food for every year of age; serve more only if the child wants it. Feed the child 5-6 times a day. Rule 3: Present food well Most children of this age have food quirks: they will not accept foods that touch each other on the plate, mixed dishes or unidentifiable foods, broken biscuits or a wrongly cut sandwich. Even when you find these quirks unreasonable, humor the child. Rule 4: Seat the child comfortably The child must be served food on the table at all times. The height of the chair and table should be age-appropriate. Thick, short handled spoons and forks allow for easier less tiring grasp. Rule 5: Do not disturb the feeding schedule By and large, try and stick to a regular feeding schedule every day. Meals should be about 3 hours apart. Schedule a quiet activity or rest before the meal so that the child is relaxed and can enjoy the meal. I am sure once you relax, your child will also start relaxing. That will be the first step when he starts eating well. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Murthy
Hi. As I am a computer professional, I lead a sedentary life style. Of late, I have been suffering from irregular bowel movement. I suffer from acne also. I am a pure vegetarian. Can you advise food that can help overcome all these. Thanks
Answer : Dear Murthy, Irregular bowel movement can be quite troublesome. Using laxatives makes the bowels dependent upon them. Do not use laxatives at all. The key to lies in eating high fiber foods. A high-fiber diet causes a large, soft, bulky stool that passes through the bowel more easily and quickly. Fiber, or roughage, is that part of a plant that cannot be digested by the body. Experts recommend a daily intake of 25-30 g of fiber in the diet to prevent and ease constipation. This can be easily achieved by eating a balanced diet which contains adequate helpings of the following fiber-rich foods: Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges, pears and pomegranates are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . You may also like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. As far as acne is concerned, there is no widely agreed-upon proof that diet affects acne. Some believe that sugary and starchy foods are rapidly digested leading to an overload in blood glucose levels. Excess glucose is in turn converted into fat which builds up in sebaceous glands causing acne. Reducing the consumption of sugary/starchy foods such as soft drinks, sweets, white bread and other junk food (fast foods, chocolates, chips, namkeens, etc) may alleviate acne. Also, sunflower, soybean, corn or safflower oils, sunflower seeds and flax seeds (alsi) may be helpful. Vitamin A and vitamin E supplements also help; consult your doctor to avoid dangerous overdosing on these vitamins. It may be better to eat natural sources of vitamin A include carrots, green leafy vegetables (broccoli, spinach, methi, bathua, cabbage, etc) and yellow/orange fruits (e.g. papaya, peaches, apricots, mangoes). Home remedies for acne include: 1. Pound orange peel well with water and apply. 2. Rub cucumber leaves or a paste of fenugreek (methi) leaves on the acne. 3. Cut a fresh clove of garlic and rub it over the pimple. 4. Drink 8-10 glasses of water everyday to impart a healthy glow to the skin 5. Grind cloves (laung) and make a paste with any face mask powder and apply overnight. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Dhir
I am 33yrs of age, a complete workholic, spend around 10-12 working, my BMI is 28, I am trying to reduce my cal content on daily basis, i eat normal food, 1 chapati in breakfast, 1 chapati in lunch, 1 for dinner, this pratice i am following for the last 1 year, on overall basis i have reduced, but i gusess because of metabolism iam not been able to reduce fast, i am not looking for a short term weight loss, but a sturdy one which i want to sustain for years.pls advice,:1. how do i deal with my metabolism2. is my diet plan is Ok3. how can i reduce weight to reduce my BMI to 23, I do drink once or twice a weekpls advice!dhir
Answer : Dear Dhir, You are absolutely right: weight loss should be permanent. This can only happen if you adopt a weight loss plan that teaches you to eat right and exercise right throughout life. However, I do not agree with you about the "fast" bit. To be sustainable, weight loss should be gradual. A rapid rate of weight loss requires a drastic reduction in calories (more than 1000 calories) and is strongly undesirable since both fat (which is desirable) and muscle or protein (which is undesirable) are lost. Weight loss should be steady and no more than 1 to 2 pounds a week (at the most, 3-4 kg a month). This rate of weight loss should continue for about 6 months leading to a reduction of 10 per cent of body weight. For the next 6 months, the focus should change from weight loss to weight maintenance. Following this phase, further weight loss may be considered. I suggest the following diet plan for you: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) - If vegetarian, you can substitute meat for one exchange of milk or pulse. Skim milk (or soy milk) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) You have mentioned that you drink once or twice a week - I don't think this should be a problem. But do restrict yourself to two small drinks (30 ml each) twice a week. At the same time, becoming more active and taking up some form of regular exercise (walking 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week or swimming/badminton/tennis/etc or training with weights for 15 minutes 3-4 times a week) will build up muscle so that you burn calories even when you sleep. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Latha
What happened to this week's Forecast??thans
Answer :
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Question by: Sahana
Could you recommend the diet to reduce hypertension and cholestrol level?
Answer : Dear Sahana, Research shows that hypertension can be managed by restricting the amount of salt in food. Indians in particular eat too much salt. Adults may be eating as much as 20 grams per day as against the recommended intake of 6 grams (a teaspoonful). To lower blood pressure, one may need to further reduce this amount to about 3/4ths of a teaspoon (4 grams in all). For this, one will need to: . Reduce the amount salt added in cooking. For flavor, use herbs and spices like lemon juice, coriander, raw mango, tomatoes, garlic and oregano. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces (soy sauce, tomato sauce, mustard, Tabasco, chilli sauce, etc) along with meals. . Avoid high-salt savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Avoid fast foods and restaurant food. . Avoid processed foods like cornflakes, bread, cheese, salted butter, biscuits, cookies, cakes, ready-to-cook vegetables/soups, canned vegetables/fruits, salad dressings and packaged fruit juices/drinks. Colas are high in sodium - avoid. . Antacids are high in sodium, do not take them. . Read labels to figure out the amount of sodium added in the form of baking powder, baking soda and preservatives like brine, sodium benzoate, monosodium glutamate or ajinomoto, sodium benzoate, etc. Reducing blood cholesterol is an important step in preventing heart disease. This is particularly important if you are overweight or have high blood pressure and/or diabetes. The first step in lowering blood cholesterol is to forego cholesterol-rich foods. However, foods low in cholesterol may still be high in saturated fat or trans fat - other types of fats which raise cholesterol levels higher much more than cholesterol-rich foods. So, you need to eliminate or at least drastically limit foods that contain saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. Avoid: . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). At the same time, you need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Increase physical activity to at least 30 minutes on most days. . If you smoke, quit immediately . Cut down on sugar and salt intake considerably If you have been prescribed any cholesterol-reducing drugs, do check with your physician regarding their potential side effects in the long term. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: E.M.THIRUMALAI
I am 70 yrs old had a bypass recently. am a NonVeg. Can you specify a good diet? Thank you
Answer : Dear Mr. Thirumalai, Life after a bypass should focus on eating a controlled diet and incorporating a reasonable amount of exercise everyday. This will prevent any heart problem in the future. I suggest the following diet for you: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 2 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 2 egg whites) Skim Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchanges ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Since I do not know your height and weight, I assume that you are not overweight. If you are overweight, then you would need to further decrease the amount of food intake to achieve an acceptable weight. And now, a word on the type of foods that you need to eat: Since you are a non-vegetarian, go in for egg whites (avoid the yolk totally) and lean meats like fish and chicken. If you enjoy fish, go in for fish at least thrice a week. For variety, fish can be made into tikkas, grilled, baked or simply a good curry. Your diet should not contain more than 2-3 teaspoons of added fat (15 g). Cut down entirely on your intake of nuts, whole milk and cheese/paneer/cream cheese, desi ghee, butter, red meat/fatty fish, organ meats, fried foods, fast foods, baked goods like biscuits/cakes/pastries/pies, snacks and munchies like chips/nachos/namkeens as they are all high in harmful fat. Since the body converts sugar into triglycerides, avoid adding sugar to food or drinks as also desserts, mithai, baked goods, candy, chocolates, soft drinks, fruit juices (fresh or packaged), fruit drinks, smoothies, packaged flavored milk/coffee, sweetened cereals, flavored yogurts and energy bars. Cut down on potatoes/arbi and very sweet fruits like banana, mango, cheekoo and grapes. If you drink, give up alcohol totally. If you smoke, quit smoking. Eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, high-fiber/low sugar fruits and vegetables, skim milk and its products, lean meats such as chicken without skin, egg white, soy products and fish. Use olive/canola/peanut oil for cooking. Instead of 3 large meals, eat 3-6 small meals a day. Also check with your doctor if you can have fish oil supplements which are rich in beneficial omega-3 fatty acids. Also, walk at a leisurely pace for 30 minutes about 5 days per week. If you find 30 minutes too long, take short 10 minute walks three times a day. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: monali
hello madam, i am an BSc nursing graduate.my problem is the thick cough which collect in my throat which pravokes me to split it out again n again as i have to take continous classes for 2hrs n its very difficult also.this happens when i drink milk every day,i stopped it for few days then this problem was not there,but i will tiered soon.i am vegiterian,i am too lean wanna put on weight,please guide me. thank you waiting for your solution for my problem.
Answer : Dear Monali, Your thick cough problem requires consulting a doctor as I doubt dietary modification by itself will help. Also, since you know that milk makes the problem worse, why not give it up? Instead try soy milk (preferably, the natural, unsweetened one). However, sine you need to put on weight, you can also have the sweetened flavored soy milks easily available in tetrapacks. Since I do not know how much weight you need to put on, I suggest that you increase your daily intake by about 300 to 500 calories. Remember, the weight you gain should be a healthy combination of muscle and fat. So while you can eat at least one food which is high in refined carbohydrates, fat and sugar (chocolates, pastries, cakes, jam, ice creams, pizzas, burgers and sandwiches), you will need to balance these with healthy foods like cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses and lean meats like chicken and fish, nuts and seeds. You may add on these foods to your regular meals or as snacks in-between meals. Eat 5-6 meals - three main meals along with 2 snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime - regularly. Do not skip any meal. But increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: MRS.
I had recently carried out my lipid profile and CRP test.The CRP shows very high reading . Consulted a Nephorologist who has put me on medicines and advised low protien diet. Can you please advise me what I should eat and what I should avoid. Thanks
Answer : Dear Mrs. Shah, You have not mentioned the results of your lipid profile test. In case they are not very elevated, I will recommend that you avoid the following foods which are rich in protein: . milk (full cream / low fat / skim) and its products (curds/ cheese/ paneer/ khoya/ mithai) . fish/chicken/meat/organ meats/pork/beef . nuts and peanut butter . Pulses including whole and split pulses, and . Soybeans and all soybean products like nutrinuggets, soybean milk, tofu You can eat grains and flours as also lots of fruits and vegetables since they are relatively low in protein. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: armando
is too much salt bad for health, especially for hypertension,diabetes
Answer : Dear Armando, Yes, too much salt is bad for health. A high salt (or sodium) intake constricts our arteries, forces the heart to pump harder, and increases blood pressure. High blood pressure - or hypertension - is a major risk factor for two big killers - heart disease and stroke. It also leads to osteoporosis (weakening of bones), kidney damage and stones and stomach cancer. Indians in particular eat too much salt. Adults may be eating as much as 20 grams per day as against the recommended intake of 6 grams. This comes from the large amount of salt that we add to food during cooking, and later, at the table. Most of us even load our salad with salt! On top, chutney, pickles, namkeens, fried foods (samosas, pakoras, vadas), fast foods (pizzas, burgers, chowmein, foot longs) - are very high in sodium. Sodium is even found in antacids. The rest of our sodium intake comes from processed foods. Baked products (biscuits, cookies, cakes, brownies, muffins and bread), cheese/sandwich spreads, cake/pudding mixes, soft drinks and fruit juices, processed meats (ham, salami, sausages, tikkas etc), ready-to-eat cereals (cornflakes, wheat flakes, muesli etc) are loaded with leavening agents, preservatives, emulsifiers, artificial sweeteners and texturizers all of which contain loads of sodium. Reading food labels is a good way of knowing the amount of added and hidden sodium. A high salt intake triggers a vicious cycle. People who are used to a high intake of salt in their regular diet need increasing amounts to be able to continue to taste its flavor - that is: the more salt you eat, the more you want. The problem is that we can live with hypertension for many years without knowing it. So shake the salt habit - NOW! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: feroz
mam, I am 43 yrs n want to change my food habits for good ,i am fond of non veg
Answer : Dear Feroz, Good food habits are the key to good health - now and later in life. The early 40s are the time when symptoms like high blood sugar/cholesterol/triglyceride/etc and high blood pressure develop. One also tends to put on weight more easily now. The combined action of all these heralds the onset of life-threatening diseases like heart disease, cancer and stroke. As a first step, I suggest you start maintaining a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week or even more. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. Then, make changes gradually. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. 1. Eat a balanced diet. Make sure your meals combine foods from all the food groups - cereals, pulses, milk/curd with liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of red meat/organ meats (goat meat, pork, liver, brain etc) and eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices should be controlled and processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai should be indulged in only occasionally. 2. Since you are fond of non-vegetarian, eat chicken and fish instead of red meats. Fish is also a great source of omega-3 fatty acids - the good fats which help your heart and elevate your mood. Eat fish thrice a week and chicken about twice a week. 3. Obviously, foods containing a lot of fat and/or sugar are dense in calories. Avoid deep-fried foods, fast foods, red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it, mithais, desserts, colas/fruit juices and alcohol. Go in for foods cooked by healthier methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. At the same time, don't completely eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. 4. Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. 5. Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. 6. Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. 7. Keep healthy snacks handy. Roasted chanas, tofu/paneer and fruits keep you going in-between meals. 8. Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. 9. Don't diet. Dieting makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. 10. Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 11. Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. 30-40 minutes of physical exercise 4-5 times a week is a must for health. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anoop
1. Kindly let me know if you have published Ratings / Listing of Hospitals and Doctors ? If yes, how can I get the copy?2.Any book helping to calculate 'Calories' of Indian foods ( Roti,Rice, Dal, Vegetables etc.
Answer : Dear Anoop, Listing of hospitals is easily available on the net at the NDTV Doctor and Medical Council of India sites. The DGHS site http://www.cbhidghs.nic.in/listofpub.asp lists their publications including a directory for Indian hospitals. You can also download comprehensive lists by searching for 'list of hospitals in India' on the net. For calculating caloric content of your food, I recommend two books: 1. Nutritive Value of Indian Foods (a publication of the National Institute of Nutrition, Indian Council of Medical Research, Hyderabad, India). This book will give you comprehensive food composition tables including calories, protein, fat, fiber, carbohydrates as well as vitamin and mineral content of ingredients used in cooking. 2. Basic Food Preparation - A complete Manual (by Usha Raina, Sushma Kashyap, Vinita Narula, Salila Thomas, Suvira, Shiela Vir, Shakuntala Chopra; Orient Longman) is more than a detailed recipe book of Indian dishes. It lists the nutritive value of each food preparation in detail. This means that you can, at a glance, know the energy/protein/carbohydrate/fat/vitamin/mineral content of each dish instead of working out the contribution of each ingredient and then totaling it up. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Muralikrishna.P
Madam, I am working in night shift,i.e., from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. At what time should take my food and what exercises must I do in order to maintain a good physical and mental being? I have no vices, I am an unmarried male, 31 years of age. Kindly reply
Answer : Dear Murali, You need adequate fueling for working at night. Before starting work, have a full dinner around 6:30 - 7:00 pm. But don't overload your stomach with high carbohydrate foods (dishes prepared with refined flours like bhatura, naan, pizza, burgers, etc and desserts/mithai) and fatty foods (fried foods, oily/creamy gravies, red meat, whole milk preparations etc). These will overload your stomach and make you sleepy through the night. Eat a balanced dinner which includes all food groups: cereal (3 exchanges or 3 medium chapatis), pulse/meat (1 exchange or one katori dal/ two pieces of chicken/fish), vegetables (1-2 exchanges or 1 small dish salad and one small katori vegetable preparation), fruit (1 exchange or 1 medium size fruit) and fat (2 exchanges or 10 g). Such a dinner will keep you going through the night. You may also include a couple of snacks during the night along with your tea breaks - around 12 pm and 4 pm. Sandwiches, idli/vada, biscuits, poha/upma and other light foods make great snacks while working. Avoid fried stuff totally. You appear to be a disciplined person: taking up and continuing with regular exercise should not be a problem for you. I usually recommend walking for 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week along with strength training (exercising with weights) or yoga for 15 minutes 3 times a week. You may find walking a problem since you would be sleeping in the morning and preparing for work in the evening. Why not buy a treadmill so that you can work out after a good sleep in the morning or any other time during the day? You can do the yoga before dinner in the evening - it will set the mood for great work during the night. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: avishi
could u please tell me the foo items that have nil or very less calories.I even wanted to know the methods of becoming slin by minimizing or reducing my diet
Answer : Dear Avishi, I do appreciate your concern to lose weight. However, there is much more to weight loss than eating low calorie foods. First, let's get a few facts straight: . Our body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. But both changes need to be done sensibly. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . To be successful, any weight loss plan should fit into our routine well. . A good plan teaches us to eat right and exercise right for life. After all, how long can we keep eating only low calorie foods? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? I suggest that you start maintaining a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. Then, make changes gradually. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. 1. Even losing weight requires a balanced diet. Stick to the food guide pyramid principles of adequate intake of cereals, millets, pulses and milk/curd, liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables, lesser consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices, and occasional indulging in processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai. 2. Obviously, foods containing a lot of fat and/or sugar are dense in calories. Avoid deep-fried foods, fast foods, red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it, mithais, desserts, colas/fruit juices and alcohol. Go in for foods cooked by healthier methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. At the same time, don't completely eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. 3. Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. 4. Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. 5. Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. 6. Keep healthy snacks handy. Roasted chanas, tofu/paneer and fruits keep you going in-between meals. 7. Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. 8. Don't diet. Dieting makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. 9. Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 10. Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. 30-40 minutes of physical exercise 4-5 times a week is a must for health. Since I do not know how much weight you need to lose, I suggest you consult a weight loss expert in your area who can guide you on a regular basis. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: avishi
could u please tell me the foo items that have nil or very less calories.I even wanted to know the methods of becoming slin by minimizing or reducing my diet
Answer : Dear Avishi, I do appreciate your concern to lose weight. However, there is much more to weight loss than eating low calorie foods. First, let's get a few facts straight: . Our body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. But both changes need to be done sensibly. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . To be successful, any weight loss plan should fit into our routine well. . A good plan teaches us to eat right and exercise right for life. After all, how long can we keep eating only low calorie foods? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? I suggest that you start maintaining a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. Then, make changes gradually. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. 1. Even losing weight requires a balanced diet. Stick to the food guide pyramid principles of adequate intake of cereals, millets, pulses and milk/curd, liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables, lesser consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices, and occasional indulging in processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai. 2. Obviously, foods containing a lot of fat and/or sugar are dense in calories. Avoid deep-fried foods, fast foods, red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it, mithais, desserts, colas/fruit juices and alcohol. Go in for foods cooked by healthier methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. At the same time, don't completely eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. 3. Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. 4. Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. 5. Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. 6. Keep healthy snacks handy. Roasted chanas, tofu/paneer and fruits keep you going in-between meals. 7. Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. 8. Don't diet. Dieting makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. 9. Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 10. Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. 30-40 minutes of physical exercise 4-5 times a week is a must for health. Since I do not know how much weight you need to lose, I suggest you consult a weight loss expert in your area who can guide you on a regular basis. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: anurag
which diet should i follow i have dark circles below eyes plz help me
Answer : Dear Anurag, Almost everyone gets dark circles under their eyes from time to time. While they are not a medical concern, these deep shadows below the eyes do mask our vitality giving us a haggard and tired look. Actually, the skin below the eyes is very thin. When blood passes through the veins below the surface of the skin, it gives the bluish tint. The more transparent your skin, the darker the circles appear. Pigmentation may also occur with age when the blood capillaries in the skin become weak, leak and the fluid from these leaky capillaries slowly accumulates below the eyes, thereby forming the look of dark circles. Any allergy or eczema which causes the eyes to itch, effect of some medicines or simply stressful or incomplete sleep can also cause the area under the eyes to appear darker. A number of home remedies are recommended to diminish the dark circles such as eating lots of green vegetables/fresh fruits and drinking plenty of water as well as placing cool cucumbers or moist, cool tea bags on your eyes. Yoga experts strongly advocate regular yoga to eliminate the circles. So, try these out. But there is really no need to lose too much sleep over the dark circles. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: raghu
dear doctor....i feel internaly iam weak.iam 26yr old.male.a slight drench in rain,a single time meal out side,a walk in cold mornings will upset my health...please sujjest me anything to get stroger immune system..thanking you raghu.
Answer : Dear Raghu, First of all, do not consider yourself internally weak. Our disposition to fall ill depends on a number of factors like heredity, our environment - both physical and social, our psychological predisposition, and yes, the food we eat. Research shows that we can boost our immunity by including certain foods in our diet and avoiding others. Vitamins C, E and A top the list of immune boosters. A diet which provides about 5-6 servings of fruits and vegetables a day will provide all these vitamins adequately. Vitamin C is naturally found in fruits such as guava, papaya, strawberries, kiwi and oranges. The habit of adding lemon to dal is ideal. Vitamin E is found in whole grains, vegetable oils and seeds. Supplements of both vitamin C and vitamin E are easily available. It may be a good idea to consume a tablet each of vitamin C (500 mg) and vitamin E (400 mg) twice a week. It is best to obtain vitamin A through food since vitamin A supplements can cause toxicity. Vitamin A is easily found in yellow, deep yellow and orange fruits and vegetables as also green leafy vegetables, milk and milk products and egg yolk. Make sure that at least 2 foods rich in the vitamin are present in the daily diet. Garlic, an age-old item in Indian cooking, also boosts immunity. Make sure it is added to at least a couple of dishes daily. Omega-3 rich fatty acids - found in fatty fish, fish oil, flax seeds (or alsi), walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) - are great infection fighters. Add flax seed oil (one teaspoon) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or flax oil capsules to your diet 3-4 times a week or combining a capsule of fish oil along with vitamin E once or twice a week for best results. At the same time, certain foods keep our immune system from doing a good job. Sugar and alcohol reduce the ability of our white blood cells (the cells which protect us from germs and infections) to kill germs. So, cut down on sugar completely or as much as possible (not more than 10-15 g a day) and restrict alcohol to a couple of drinks (30 ml each) twice a week. Obesity also depresses the immune system; so keep your weight under control. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Seema
My daughteris of 3.5 years.She is very active but she did not look healthy. At her age children usually have a glowing complexion but hers has a rough skin and looks very thin. Kindly guide me which items I should include in her diet for a healthy body, skin and mind. Reply soon.
Answer : Dear Seema, I hope you received my earlier reply. Meeta
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Question by: Seema
My daughteris of 3.5 years.She is very active but she did not look healthy. At her age children usually have a glowing complexion but hers has a rough skin and looks very thin. Kindly guide me which items I should include in her diet for a healthy body, skin and mind. Reply soon.
Answer : Dear Seema, Growth during early childhood (1-6 years) is usually slow which is probably why your daughter looks thin. But we need to ensure that she get adequate minerals and vitamins which will keep her glowing and healthy. At this age, children are very selective about food. They may simply refuse to eat vegetables and pulses which can cause deficiency of important nutrients. At this age, your daughter should be more or less consuming the following portion sizes of various foods. Cereals - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice or 2 biscuits) Pulses - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg). If vegetarian, substitute meat exchange with 1 exchange of pulse or milk Milk - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Roots & tubers - 1 exchange ((1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Green leafy vegetables - ½ exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - ½ exchange (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) In addition, you need to remember that your daughter is going through a slow growth phase. As a result, her appetite is also poor. Children of this age are usually disinterested in food and develop food jags: refusing previously accepted foods or asking for the same food at each meal. Do follow these 5 golden rules: Rule 1: No child can be forced to eat Do not struggle to control your daughter's eating situation. This stage is temporary. Continue to offer a variety of foods including the child's favorite foods. Rule 2: Give small, frequent meals Because of a smaller stomach, give your daughter 5-6 small meals a day. Offer 1 tablespoon of each food for every year of age; serve more only if the child wants it. Add small amounts of fats/oils/nuts which enrich the food without making it bulky. Rule 3: Present food well Present the food well. Humor food quirks such as not eating foods that touch each other on the plate, mixed dishes, broken biscuits or a wrongly cut sandwich. Rule 4: Seat your daughter comfortably Serve food to your daughter at the table at all times. The height of the chair and table should be age-appropriate. Bowls, plates and cups should be unbreakable and heavy enough to resist tipping. Thick, short handled spoons and forks allow for easier less tiring grasp. Rule 5: Do not disturb the feeding schedule Stick to a regular feeding schedule every day with a meal every 3 hours. Schedule a quiet activity or rest before the meal so that the child is relaxed and can enjoy the meal. Do not give any food or drink within one and a half hours of a meal. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: sikander
i have this problem of gynaecomastia due to fat deposition.i am 172 cm tall and weigh about 71kg.is there any weigh i can reduce this through my diet?
Answer : Dear Sikander, Why are you worried about your weight? You are a fairly tall man and your weight is quite within the acceptable range (Your weight for height ratio or BMR is 23.9 which is within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9). So all you need to worry about is to prevent further weight gain and over time, gradually reduce weight by 2-3 kg. For this you need to eat with caution and also become more physically active. As far as gynaecomastia is concerned, you need to consult a doctor (if you have not already done so). The doctor will check the size of the breast tissue every few months. Do not worry; the problem is usually resolved easily. Here are some tips for keeping your weight in check: 1. Eat 4-5 smaller meals during the day instead of 2 or 3 big ones. 2. Have regular meals because skipping meals leads to out-of-control hunger, often resulting in overeating. 3. Don't eat too much of any one thing. Make sure foods from all food groups - cereals, dairy products, meat/fish/chicken and vegetables/fruits - are included in each meal. 4. Keep healthy snacks - roasted chanas, nuts (not fried, not salted), fruit, yoghurt - handy at home, in the office and in the car. Snacks keep you going till the next meal and prevent bingeing at meals. 5. Eat slowly and stop eating before you become overfull. 6. At any get-together, don't sample everything on the table. Limit your choices to the healthiest few. 7. Don't go on a diet as deprivation only makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. 8. Don't weigh yourself every day. Weigh yourself once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 9. Limit fat intake: avoid deep-fried foods, fast foods and other low-nutrient snacks like chips, cookies and candy. Choose foods that are boiled, grilled, roasted, and steamed. 10. Cut down on sugar. Prefer dessert made with fresh fruit. Eat only half the portion of your favorite dessert. 11. Cut down your intake of beverages like sodas, coffee and alcohol. Instead, drink lots of water - at least 10-12 glasses per day. 12. Exercise more to burn the excess calories, to keep bones, muscles, and joints healthy, and to reduce the risk of diabetes, blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. You need not join a gym or a health club to exercise. Take up walking 40-45 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on 15 minutes of yoga or strength training (training with weights) 3 times a week. Become more active by taking the stairs instead of the elevator, parking further than you need to and doing household chores. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: shamna
i want to know details about IAS achievers,can u help me
Answer : i think you can contact the week directly
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Question by: mukesh
how can i get the copy of last year issue dt.12 nov 2006.
Answer : Dear Mukesh, I think you need to write an email to THE WEEK directly and find out. Meeta
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Question by: machu
hi,i am a software engg 23 yrsof age.my diet is usually two dosa in morn and mostly chicken item for lunch.dinner roti or dosa item. all the food are outside made as i dont cook. Please tell me about the future threats if i follow this eating style. i dont have much options for eating out so pls suggest some vitamins tat i have to take care of.
Answer : Dear Machu, You are a busy young man who needs to take extra care of his diet especially as you live away from home. Eating out for you has become more of a compulsion than an enjoyable treat. Most choices on the menu are very far from good nutrition and the chances of stomach infections is high; yet, it is possible to eat healthy outside your home. Follow these simple rules and you can make eating out a healthy affair. Select the food joint with care Avoid dhabas and small eateries. The oil used here is usually poor quality and they tend to add large amounts of it. Chances of infection are also high. Bigger eating joints serve a wider variety of foods - both vegetarian and non-vegetarian - so that it is possible to select nutritionally sound foods. They are also more clean and hygienic. Don't skip meals Eat 3 main meals regularly. Make sure you do not skip breakfast or lunch since this can make you so ravenous that you will end up eating whatever you can lay your hands on. For example, if you miss lunch, you will be tempted to eat chips/fried snacks around 6. Making the menu selection Avoid buffets since they promote overeating. In India, curries are usually steeped in oil. Avoid gravies and fried items. Go in for dishes that are steamed, tandoori/roasted or stir-fried. Even when ordering chicken tikka, most chefs add a few tablespoons of oil to 'flavor' the tikka - be sure to ask that it be prepared in a "low fat" way. When ordering dal, avoid the tadka totally. Always order a tossed greens salad or a vegetable soup before dinner. But stay clear of salads with creamy dressings usually served in fancy restaurants. Restaurants usually add a lot of oil in steaming the dosa - opt for idlis instead. Or try eating tandoori roti every alternate day. Eat limited amounts of coconut chutney - it is high in fat. Order desserts made fresh fruit. If you must eat your favorite dessert, eat only half the portion. If you must eat your favorite dessert, eat only half the portion served or split with others. Eat slightly less at dinner and enjoy a healthy glass of toned milk just before you go to bed. Try having breakfast at home Give breakfast a shot at home. An egg is a better and healthier option for breakfast along with a glass of milk, some fruit and toast. Restrict the amount of butter and cheese on the toast. You will not only save expense but eat healthier. Control portion size Portion sizes at restaurants are usually double or triple what a person would normally eat. If possible, order "half sizes". Otherwise, eat only one-third to one-half of the meal and take the rest home for the next day. Keep healthy snacks around While you don't cook at home, you can always keep a supply of healthy snacks at home and at work. Buy high fiber fruits such as apples, pears, guavas. When hungry, simply eat a fruit. Keep roasted chanas and nuts around - pop in a few when you feel like it. Do not be tempted by the fried samosas, bread pakoras and vadas that usually do the rounds in offices. Do not give in to bingeing on biscuits - they are loaded with harmful fats. Watch the beverages -sodas, coffee and alcohol We usually do not realize the number of sodas and coffees we drink at work. All are loaded with harmful sugar. Restrict your coffee/soda/tea intake to 2 cups during the day. If you drink, remember that alcohol is calorie-dense. Drink in moderation (3-4 drinks a week) and choose light beer or wine over whisky. Drink lots of water Drink 10-12 glasses of bottled water at hourly intervals throughout the day. This will keep refreshed all day and also keep the hunger at bay. Be physically fit Take up some exercise which you do consistently and regularly throughout life. Walk for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a day. You can jog, cycle, swim or play a game of badminton/tennis/squash or join a gym. Or if you are fun-loving, enroll in a salsa/aerobic dancing class in your area. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: G.D.Bhartia
I am 77yearold vegetarin.Bowell movementis very irregular.Usally have to go 3to4times.Stool is in form of pellets and with mucus.I d0not drink or smoke.Please advise suitable diet
Answer : Dear Mr. Bhartia, Maintaining a regular bowel movement is very important at all ages and especially your age. Stool in the form of pellets usually indicates excessive absorption of water from stools in the colon and as a result, constipation. While stool normally contains small amounts of mucus, visible amounts of mucus in the stool may be a symptom of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), ulcerative colitis (UC), a bacterial infection, anal fissure, or a bowel obstruction. It sometimes is just an indication of diarrhea or constipation. I suggest you consult a doctor as well. In the meantime, it may be helpful to increase your fiber and water intake. Fiber, or roughage, is that part of a plant that cannot be digested by the body. You may consider eating the following fiber-rich foods: . Whole grain products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. . Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets . Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges and pears are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. . To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . You may also like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: jo
Hi Madam,I am Jo from kerala and i am a software engineer. I am 22 years old. My problem is my abdomen is bulky. I didn't get the time to do some exercises. (I know, this is only an excuse). There are some electronic belts like "sauna belt", "butter fly abs", which are seen in tele brand shows in tv. PLEASE GIVE ME AN ADVISE WHETHER THESE BELTS ARE USEFUL TO REDUCE THE FAT IN THE ABDOMEN (is there any side effects by using them). Is there any other way to reduce the fat in the abdomen?
Answer : Dear Jo, Isn't abdominal fat a common problem for most of us? Yet, when one looks around, not many of us are doing anything about it. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. Belly fat is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. A waist circumference greater than 35 inches is definitely a high risk factor in women. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. But remember, you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. I do not believe in the electronic belt route for reducing abdominal fat. Any such reduction in waist size is likely to be temporary and brought about by 'artificial means'. I strongly recommend measures which will need to become a part of your lifestyle and thus, will be sustainable in the long run. I do not know whether you are overweight or not, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; soft drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. This will also keep the fat away. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Balasubramanian
Best way to reduce body weight?
Answer : Dear Balasubramaniam, You have asked me a very general question and I will give a general answer. Weight is a fine balance of calories in (from the food we eat) and calories out (spent in the work we do). A nutritious diet and adequate physical activity are both important for maintaining weight. So tips for reducing weight are: 1. Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. 2. Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. 3. Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. 4. Stick to the food guide pyramid principles of adequate intake of cereals, millets, pulses and milk/curd, liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables, lesser consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices, and occasional indulging in processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai. 5. Balance your food choices over time. Not every food has to be "perfect." Don't feel guilty if you love foods such as apple pie, potato chips, candy bars or ice cream. Eat them once in a while and select other foods which balance and variety that are vital to good health. 6. Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. 7. Keep healthy snacks handy. Roasted chanas, tofu/paneer and fruits keep you going in-between meals. 8. Limit fat and sugar intake by avoiding deep-fried foods and choosing healthier cooking methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it, colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices. Serve water, milk and soy milk (without added sugar) instead. 9. Limit alcohol intake since it contributes 7 calories per gram and spares fat from being oxidized. 10. Don't sample everything on the buffet table or at any get-together. 11. Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. 12. Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. 13. Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. 14. Don't diet. Dieting makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. 15. Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 16. Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. 30-40 minutes of physical exercise 4-5 times a week is a must for health. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: R
I am a 5'10" male weighing about 90 kgs. I am having the problem of protein loss through urine because of high BP. Presently, I am taking 50 mg Atenolol and 10 mg Enalapril Maleate for the BP. I wish to lose weight through healthy foods. Can you please recommend a daily diet for the above purpose.
Answer : Dear Madhusudan, Your primary problem has been high blood pressure which has led to the protein loss through urine and may further lead to kidney damage (and heart problems) if you are not careful at this stage. You are also overweight: your weight should be about 75 kg. The doctor has already prescribed medications which will control your blood pressure and also protect your kidneys. All you now need to do is take the medication regularly, check your blood glucose and urine protein levels regularly, follow a healthy eating plan and get plenty of exercise. This will ensure that your blood pressure, protein levels in urine and weight come under control. A diet which restricts salt and protein intake is usually recommended for conditions like yours. Since there is much more to a low protein diet than just cutting back on protein or going vegetarian, I suggest you meet with a dietitian face-to-face for a detailed discussion on your diet. First, find out the total amount of protein that you need to consume in accordance with your condition. Doctors usually recommend 0.6 g protein /kg body weight (that is, you would need 0.6 x 90 kg = 54 g of protein). The dietitian can then work out the number of exchanges of each food group that you can eat. Do not eat more than this amount of protein. Also, before embarking on the diet, do check the need for protein and vitamin supplements. I am giving below some tips for cutting back on your salt and also other lifestyle changes that you will need to make. 1. To cut back on salt: . Reduce the amount salt added in cooking. For flavor, use herbs and spices like lemon juice, coriander, raw mango, tomatoes, garlic and oregano. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces (soy sauce, tomato sauce, mustard, Tabasco, chilli sauce, etc) along with meals. . Avoid high-salt savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Avoid fast foods and restaurant food. . Avoid processed foods like cornflakes, bread, cheese, salted butter, biscuits, cookies, cakes, ready-to-cook vegetables/soups, canned vegetables/fruits, salad dressings and packaged fruit juices/drinks. Colas are high in sodium - avoid. . Antacids are high in sodium, do not take them. . Read labels to figure out the amount of sodium added in the form of baking powder, baking soda and preservatives like brine, sodium benzoate, monosodium glutamate or ajinomoto, sodium benzoate, etc. 2. If you drink alcohol, do so only moderately (three-four 30 ml drinks per week). 3. If you smoke, quit smoking 4. Exercise moderately. Walking (30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week) is the best exercise for you. If you feel comfortable, take up swimming or cycling. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Tukaram
What sort of daily food should i follow to control the weight. My hight is 5 feet 7 inch and weight is 65 kgs. I am becoming little bit fat. So i just wanted to know how to follow the nutricious diet. Please give me some tips. Thanks and regardsTukaram
Answer : Dear Tukaram, A weight of 65 kg for a height of 5'7" is ideal. Nevertheless, it is very easy to put on weight and I appreciate your concern. You need to now focus on maintaining this ideal weight. First of all, you need to understand that weight is a fine balance of calories in (from the food we eat) and calories out (spent in the work we do). A nutritious diet and adequate physical activity are both important for maintaining weight. So: 1. Maintain a food diary. Write down everything you eat for a week. The diary will mirror all that is good and bad about your food intake. It will also help you to understand the unconscious triggers that make you eat the wrong foods. 2. Make changes gradually. Changing too much, too fast can get in the way of success. Begin to remedy excesses or deficiencies with modest changes that can add up to positive, lifelong eating habits. 3. Eat 4-5 small, frequent meals during the day rather than 2 or 3 big ones. Also, do not skip meals which lead to out-of-control hunger and overeating. 4. Stick to the food guide pyramid principles of adequate intake of cereals, millets, pulses and milk/curd, liberal amounts of fruits and vegetables, lesser consumption of meat/chicken/fish, eggs, fats/oils, sugar and spices, and occasional indulging in processed foods, fast foods, and desserts/mithai. 5. Balance your food choices over time. Not every food has to be "perfect." Don't feel guilty if you love foods such as apple pie, potato chips, candy bars or ice cream. Eat them once in a while and select other foods which balance and variety that are vital to good health. 6. Don't eliminate the foods you love. Denial almost always fails. So, eat for pleasure but within limit. 7. Keep healthy snacks handy. Roasted chanas, tofu/paneer and fruits keep you going in-between meals. 8. Limit fat and sugar intake by avoiding deep-fried foods and choosing healthier cooking methods, such as boiling, grilling, roasting, and steaming. Avoid red meat, whole milk and paneer/cheese/curd made from it, colas, fruit drinks and fruit juices. Serve water, milk and soy milk (without added sugar) instead. 9. Limit alcohol intake since it contributes 7 calories per gram and spares fat from being oxidized. 10. Don't sample everything on the buffet table or at any get-together. 11. Don't overeat. Portion size is key to weight management. At any meal, stop eating before you are full. 12. Before putting anything in your mouth, ask yourself: Am I really hungry? If the answer is no, put the food down. 13. Eat slowly. This stops you from eating before you become overfull. 14. Don't diet. Dieting makes the urge to eat more strong and you end up eating more than you would normally. The result: you put on more weight than you lost in the beginning. 15. Don't weigh yourself every day only once a month. Ask yourself questions like: How's your energy level? Did you make healthy food choices? And so on. 16. Take up some physical exercise which you enjoy regularly. It could be walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, playing badminton/tennis/squash or simply join a gym. 30-40 minutes of physical exercise 4-5 times a week is a must for health. So, go ahead: Take charge of your eating and health today! With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: ARATHI
HEY,I AM 19 YRS OLDand WEIGH 70KGS.MY HEIGHT IS 160cm.AS PER BMI I BELONG TO THE OBESE SACLE.I AM REALLY LOOKING FOREWORD TO LOSE WEIGHT PERMANENTLY and AS FAST AS POSSIBLE.WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP WITH THE DETAILS?I HAIL FROM KOLLAM IN KERALA,WOULD YOU PLEASE INFORM ME WHOM TO MEET IN THIS CONCERN?
Answer : Dear Arathi, You are a young girl about to go out into the world. You definitely need to lose weight - your target should be about 15 kgs within the year. More importantly, this weight loss should be done under the guidance of an expert. I agree with you that the weight loss needs to be "Permanent" and this can only happen if you adopt a weight loss plan which teaches you to eat right and exercise right throughout life. Research shows that weight loss measures which do not fit into the lifestyle of the person are least likely to be sustained beyond the plan period. I do not agree with you about the "As fast as possible" bit. Weight loss has to be gradual. In fact, beware of "Wonder Weight Loss" consultants who promise large weight loss within weeks. A high rate of weight loss requires a drastic reduction in calories (more than 1000 calories) it is strongly undesirable since both fat (which is desirable) and muscle or protein (which is undesirable) are lost. Weight loss should be steady and no more than 1 to 2 pounds a week (at the most, 3-4 kg a month). This rate of weight loss should continue for about 6 months leading to a reduction of 10 per cent of body weight. For the next 6 months, the focus should change from weight loss to weight maintenance. Following this phase, further weight loss may be considered. I suggest you speak to doctors or call up the talking yellow pages service to find out the various weight management experts in your area. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sreekanth
dear dr,i am 23 and height 5.7 and weight 90.so vat diet i have to take.can i take banana regularly.at present i am eating only dosa or idly night times.so is any better diet i can follow to reduce my weight.
Answer : Dear Sreekanth, A young man like you needs to lose weight definitely. You need to lose 20-25 kg over the next one year. I suggest you consult a weight management expert in your area who will analyze your physical and biochemical profile in detail (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to change your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about the extreme weight loss. He/she will put you on a calorie-restricted diet which provides you about 1500 calories (or even less if your work is sedentary). Your current eating pattern of bananas, dosa and idly points to a high carbohydrate diet which needs to be balanced with more proteins and complex carbohydrates (whole grains, legumes/pulses and vegetables). Also, your fat intake will need to be regulated. At the same time, you will need to take up regular exercise which will ensure that extra fat and not muscle is lost in the weight loss. Brisk walking, jogging, cycling, swimming or some sport that you enjoy are a must for you. Do any one of these for 30 minutes, 4-5 times a week. For a fit look, take up strength training (exercising with weights) for about 15-20 minutes at least 3 times a week. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: H
Myself H.R.Sonawane am 75 now weighing 45Kg RBC count is abt 12 and blood pressure is 80-120 ;for the last 25 years i have been suffering from 'unspecified colitis' as termed by de specialist.there is no stomach ache or blood in the stool or any such problems, time to time i have done all the necesary tests that is X-ray and endoscopy and all the reports are normal.i donot have porblems in stomach as long as i continue to eat in small amounts,my only problem is that when i eat a little more i feel heaviness in my stomach and hav to skip my next meal.Could u please suggest a diet.
Answer : Dear Mr. Sonawane, First let me congratulate you on your excellent health. As we become older, four-five smaller meals are better tolerated than three substantial ones. So, do go on eating small meals every 2-3 hours. Skipping meals is not good for anyone especially at your age when you need to ensure that all your nutrient requirements are met through an adequate diet. Maintaining a regular motion is very important. Make sure that you eat enough fiber through high fiber fruits such as banana, guava, pear, apples, guava, oranges, and pomegranates. Eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp; avoid fruit juices. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content - add these to your breakfast cereal. Include green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua as also beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin). Do not miss to eat at least two exchanges of fruits (that is, two medium sized fruits) and 3 exchanges of vegetables (2-3 small katoris) everyday. You can make your rice, chapati and dals more nutritious by adding a small amount of vegetables. You also need to drink lots of water (8-10 full glasses) everyday even if it means frequent trips to the toilet. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Moushumi
My husband has high triglyceride and has stopped eating potatoes and sweet completely. He is also under medication. His weight has reduced. What should be his diet?
Answer : Dear Moushumi, Your husband has already started eating a controlled diet and has lost weight - both are sure shot steps towards reducing triglyceride levels in the blood (and thus, reducing the risk for heart disease). Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in our diet. They come from cooking oil, ghee, and butter. Give your husband a low fat diet with not more than 2-3 teaspoons of added fat (15 g). Cut down entirely on his intake of nuts, whole milk and cheese/paneer/cream cheese, meats/fatty fish, organ meats, fried foods, fast foods, baked goods like biscuits/cakes/pastries/pies, snacks and munchies like chips/nachos/namkeens as they are all high in harmful fat. Triglycerides are also made in our body from sugar and alcohol. Reduce his sugar intake: avoid adding sugar to food or drinks, desserts, mithai, baked goods, candy, chocolates, soft drinks, fruit juices (fresh or packaged), fruit drinks, smoothies, packaged flavored milk/coffee/yoghurt, sweetened cereals, flavored yogurts and energy bars. In addition to potatoes, your husband will also need to cut down concentrated starchy foods such as pasta, rice, rolls, pizza, popcorn, and also many fat-free foods and ready-to-eat cereals. Persuade him to reduce his alcohol intake or to give up alcohol totally. Even a one-time drinking binge can significantly increase triglycerides. If he smokes, he should quit smoking. Whole grains, pulses, lots of high-fiber/low sugar fruits and vegetables, skim milk and its products, lean meats such as chicken without skin, egg white, soy products and fish are best for your husband. Use olive/canola/peanut oil for cooking. A small portion of 8-10 nuts - almonds/walnuts/peanuts/mixed nuts - are excellent for him. Instead of 3 large meals, he should eat 3-6 small meals a day. Also check with your doctor if you can give him fish oil supplements. Research shows that increasing physical activity is very helpful in lowering triglycerides. Join your husband as he inculcates the habit of regular exercise. Let him walk, jog or swim for a minimum of 30 minutes, 5 days per week. Let your husband try out a strict diet/exercise regime for a few weeks. Your doctor may still need to give some triglyceride-lowering medication but do continue with the regime. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pradeep
what is the ideal diet during the first month of pregnacy...is it necessary to have supplements during this period
Answer : Dear Pradeep, Pregnancy is a special time in a woman's life. From conception to delivery, the growing baby is totally dependent on the mother. What she eats and drinks defines the health status of the baby at birth, during childhood, and also later in life. A healthy diet also helps the mother avoid pregnancy complications such as anemia, high blood pressure, and diabetes and minimizes morning sickness, fatigue, and constipation. But pregnancy does not give the woman license to eat and drink all that she wants. Far from being a time for overindulgence, pregnancy is a time to eat sensibly and healthily. The growing fetus is very, very small in the first three months (about 2 inches long and a mere 15 grams) so the mother does not need anything extra now. She just needs to eat a balanced diet which includes foods from all groups - cereals, pulses, meat/fish/chicken, milk, green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, roots, fruits and fats/nuts/oilseeds so that all her nutrient needs are met. From the fourth month onwards, the baby grows quickly: An increase of only 300 calories per day is required which can be easily met through an additional exchange of cereal (30 g) combined with an exchange of pulse (30 g) or milk (100 ml), one exchange of vegetable and/or fruit (100 g each) and 1-2 exchanges of fat (5-10 g). These foods can be either added on to routine meals or eaten as snack. She also does not need any supplements at this stage. Later, her doctor will advise her iron/ folate and other supplements. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: YASMIN
HELLO MAM,i am 5.5inches tall and weigh 65kgs.I started my yoga when i was 89kgs, now i only need to reduce 4 more inches around my waist and my hips.i am trying my levell best n avoiding the oily stuff from last month but its of like no use, i havent even shed a kilo neither have i lost an inch.i eat raw vegetables, i am drinking lot of juice etc but its just not working.pls suggest me something that shud help me reduce my required inches.i shall be very grateful and obliged. thanking you yasmin
Answer : Dear Yasmin, Congratulations on achieving such a great weight loss! You are an example as to how weight can be lost through effort and discipline. Your BMI (or a measure of weight in relation to height) is now 23.8 which is in the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. You don't really need to bother about losing some more weight. I am sure if you continue yoga (and perhaps take up a light sustainable exercise like walking for 30 minutes 4-5 times a week) you will be able to keep the weight off. Also, you don't really need to set such rigid inch loss goals. Fat around the middle - abdomen and hips - takes a long time to go. I suggest you start eating a normal balanced diet which provides about 1200 calories. There is no point resorting to measures that you cannot sustain in the long run. A 1200 calories diet which is truly balanced will not only provide you with the required energy and proteins, but also ensure adequate fiber, vitamins and minerals. An indicative diet plan for 1200 calories is given below: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) If you are a vegetarian, substitute the meat exchange with one exchange of milk or milk products. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: C
Madam. My Son and Daughter are aged 13 and 10 years. We are strict vegetarians. What is the ideal diet we should follow for our Children. My Daughter's appetite is poor. What is SOYA Milk. Is it beneficial.It is being marketed by GODREJ in TETRA PACK with different flavours. Can we given them. Can we also give them THREPTIN Biscuits. Thank You Madam.
Answer : Dear Raj Kumar, Both your children are in their pubertal years - a period which will see rapid physical, psychological, cognitive and sexual growth. This is also the time when children need to be handled sensitively: nothing - including food - can be forced on them. Your son aged 13 years requires about 2400 calories per day; your daughter about 2000 calories. Their requirements can be adequately met through a balanced diet which includes a lot of protein foods (milk, milk products, pulses and nuts) as well as protective foods (fruits and vegetables). However, make sure that they do not consume too much sugar and fat as this does not help in any way. Both of them need at the most 6 exchanges of sugar (30 g) and 5 exchanges of fat added to food (25 grams). Fast foods and junk foods are very attractive at this age - encourage them to make healthy food choices. Nowadays, children's appetite is usually poor because they do not exert much physically. Encourage both your children to take up any sport or dance form regularly. But do not force the issue - children will automatically eat when their body demands are high. Soy milk is made from soy beans which are a great source of good quality proteins. Low in saturated fat (bad fat), high in polyunsaturated fat (good fat) and cholesterol free, soy beans and soy bean products like soy milk are considered the world's perfect food. They are also rich in isoflavones - chemicals that promote heart health, bone health and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Though originally recommended for people with lactose intolerance or milk allergy, soy milk is becoming increasingly popular as a tasty and nutritious drink. Soy milk is fine for your children especially plain (unsweetened) soy milk which can be drunk, added to cereal or made into a smoothie or milk shake. The flavored varieties are also fine except that they contain lots of sugar but drinking one 200 ml pack a day should be fine. Threptin biscuits are fine but if your children are getting proteins from milk, soy milk, pulses etc, then the high-protein Threptin biscuits may be overkill. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: kumar
i am 32 yrs old male weghing 65 kgs ht 5'10 but ihav a pro blem iam developing tummy even wen i excersice i develop fat around my abdomen region soon is tere any food diet which i wiil not bale to develop fat around my abdomen can u advise pls
Answer : Dear Kumar, Your weight for height is perfect. Fat on the tummy is the first sign that you are consuming extra calories. Whenever our body gets more calories than it needs, it packs away the extra energy as fat firstly in the midsection - abdomen, thighs and buttocks - since it requires less energy to carry the extra weight here as compared to anywhere else on the body. Long work hours with little time to exercise, travel and eating on the run as also high stress levels promote greater fat deposition in the abdominal area. Belly fat is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. A waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor in men. So, your concern for the fat on your tummy is well-timed. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot make abdominal fat magically disappear overnight. In men, abdominal fat is probably the last fat that will go. While you are not overweight, you need to start consuming slightly fewer calories than what you are presently consuming. Since I do not know your diet pattern, I suggest you cut down on fatty foods in your diet - fast foods; fried foods like chips, samosas, pakodas and namkeens; curries, gravies and cream sauces; butter, mayonnaise and rich salad dressings - as well as high calorie foods such as mithai and desserts; sugar in tea/coffee/milk; aerated drinks; white foods such as white breads/pasta/rice; red meats and alcohol especially beer. Make sure you do not skip any meals - have three main meals and two snacks during the day. Eat lots of vegetables and fruits along with whole grain cereals and pulses. Keep a check on your portions - we are often tempted to take second (and even third) helpings without realizing it. At the same time, take up some routine physical exercise. Walk at least 30 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training (training with weights) since it burns fat even after the exercise session. Yoga has specific asanas which seek to reduce abdominal fat such as the Pavanmuktasan, dhanurasan (both lying on stomach and standing), bhujangasan and many others. Take up strength training/yoga for at least 15 minutes 3-4 times a week. I am sure if you try all this, you will also get rid of the fat on your tummy. This will also keep the fat away. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: pooja
Dear Sir,We have subscribe week magzine before 7-8 month. with that we got a scheme of cordless.Now we are facing some problem in using cordless Phone it is still under warranty.Please suggest some steps to ractify the problem
Answer : Dear Pooja, Can you please write to THE WEEK directly? Meeta
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Question by: rajeshkumar
Plz sagest me the diet iam 26y old height 5'10" and wight124kg and i would like to reduce so plz sagest me the diet thank you
Answer : Dear Rajesh, You are a tall, young man whose weight should be between 71-75 kg. This means that you are carrying almost 50 kg extra weight. Considering your age, there is urgent need to bring down your weight as much as possible. However, weight loss is a complex process and should be done under expert guidance and supervision. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert in your area who will analyze your physical and biochemical profile in detail (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to change your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about the extreme weight loss. Some doctors may suggest treating your weight problem surgically. These surgical procedures - gastric bypass and gastroplasty - reduce the size and capacity of the stomach from bottle to small glass size. While these methods are successful in bringing about weight loss and have become increasingly popular in the West, experts caution that gastric bypass is major surgery and should not be undertaken lightly. I suggest that in consultation with your weight management expert, you work out a comprehensive plan which will include calorie restriction, exercise, lifestyle modification and psychological counseling. Also, try to involve your family members since this will ensure greater success in achieving the weight loss and further, maintaining it. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: kumar
Dear Dr,I am Kumar of 30 year old. I used to be 77 kgs and after going to the GYM for 6 months I reduced to 66 Kgs. De to extensive travel for official purpose not able to do exercise regularly and I obseve that I am gaining calories at the lower abdomen quickly. Would like to know other than exercise which I do whenever I have the opportunity how to ensure I maintain a flat abdomen and tummy. Thanx. Paresh
Answer : Dear Kumar, Your concern for fitness at this age will ensure your good health in the long run. Fat on the belly is a great health risk and leads to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, high blood sugar and heart disease. A waist circumference greater than 40 inches is definitely a high risk factor in men. Traveling messes with routine badly. Hectic days, eating out, drinking, late nights wreck havoc ... and allow fat to build up around the belly. Yet, you can healthy outside your home if you know how to make healthy choices. Here are some tips: 1. Have a full healthy meal before leaving home. Do the same when traveling back home. 2. Turn down the minibar key of the hotel to avoid tempting yourself with goodies. 3. Keep meals and snacks three to four hours apart. Eat only when hungry. 4. Eat a healthy breakfast which keeps you going until lunch. 5. Avoid buffets since they promote overeating. 6. Instead of dishes described with words like fried, creamed, in cheese sauce, scalloped, hollandaise, béarnaise, basted, sautéed, and au gratin, order dishes that are steamed, broiled, baked, grilled/ tandoori, roasted, poached, sautéed or stir-fried. 7. Having a tossed greens salad or a broth-based soup or a fruit cup before dinner - this will help you fill up less with the main meal. 8. Limit yourself to one roll of whole grain bread (without butter) with the soup or salad. 9. Instead of salads drenched with fatty dressings (Russian, Italian, mayonnaise, blue cheese), choose a light dressing such as lemon and vinegar (French dressing, balsamic dressing). 10. Most Indian curries and cream sauces are loaded with fat and calories. Ask for thse on the side or else, eat only very small amounts. 11. Order "half size" portions or simply leave half the portion served. 12. Drink in moderation and preferably, choose light beer or wine. Forego snacks like peanuts, chips, mini hot dogs, and chicken wings along with the drinks. 13. Order desserts made fresh fruit. If you must eat your favorite dessert, eat only half the portion. 14. Carry snacks so that rushed schedules and delays do not make you indulge high calorie snacks from outside. 15. When possible, avoid large meals at night. 16. Go slow on alcohol. Do not drink more than one or two drinks a day. 17. Drink 10-12 glasses of bottled water at hourly intervals throughout the day. 18. Forgive yourself for any "diet" blunders; take a walk, visit the gym or swim in the pool. In addition, yoga has specific asanas for reducing abdominal fat - yoga does not require any equipment and can be easily done in the hotel room early in the morning. Or stow in your walking shoes in the suitcase: go for a brisk walk early morning - you will feel more at home in the city you visit. When in town, take up strength training (training with weights) instead of vigorous exercises at the gym. Strength training builds up muscles so that you burn fat even when you rest and sleep. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: shikha
I am taking medicin for imbslance thyride and my uric acid is also higher than the normal rate.Please advice what should i avoid in eating and what should I prefer for eating.
Answer : Dear Shikha, Along with medicine, your diet is equally important for your thyroid problem. Foods containing goitrogens - chemicals which may worsen the thyroid disorder - are specifically to be avoided: soy (soybeans and all soy products such as soy milk, soy flour, nutrinuggets, and tofu), broccoli, radishes, turnips, spinach, mustard greens, cabbage and cauliflower. Although cooking these foods may reduce the effect, it is better to avoid them totally. Since hypothyroidism is usually linked with weight gain, check your weight regularly. Eat mini meals spread out through the day rather than three larger meals. This will balance the slow metabolism of hypothyroidism. Just remember, keep these meals small, around 300 calories each, and include exercise. Since high uric acid levels can lead to kidney stones and gout, what you eat can lower your uric acid levels. So you need to: . Limit intake of high fat foods like oils/ghee/vanaspati/butter, gravies, whole milk (and paneer/cheese/curd made from whole milk), cream, ice cream, fried foods and salad dressings. Prefer low-fat dairy products. . Limit the intake of high protein foods such as meats and pulses/beans/peas. Specifically avoid red meat (goat/lamb/veal) and organ meats as also soups made from meat stocks. . Avoid or limit alcohol. . Eat complex carbohydrates - chakki-ground atta, bran, oatmeal - since they help you get rid of extra uric acid. Avoid high fat, refined breads, biscuits, muffins, cakes, doughnuts, pancakes . Eat fruits such as banana, apples, pears, guava, oranges, fresh cherries, pineapple, strawberries, blueberries, and other red-blue berries . If you are overweight, lose weight - but gradually. Rapid weight loss can increase uric acid levels . Drink 8-12 glasses of water every day to reduce formation of kidney stones . Chocolate, cocoa, coffee and tea are fine. Such a diet will also be helpful for your thyroid and will help you keep your weight under control. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: dr.k.jacob
Hearty congrtulations on selecting 10 emerging indians.Iam quite impressed with the kind of talents we have in this country.They make us feel proud as indians.Would you please send their email ID s,so that i can personally greet them,with regards,dr.jacob roy.k
Answer :
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Question by: a
food habit for gutt
Answer : Dear a, I suppose you mean which foods are good for a healthy gut? Well, fiber-rich foods ensure that problems like constipation, flatulence and bloating are avoided. Fiber, or roughage, is that part of a plant that cannot be digested by the body. Experts recommend a daily intake of 25-30 g of fiber in the diet which can be achieved by eating the following fiber-rich foods: Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges and pears are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Mrs
I am housewife aged 34 yrs having a son of 10 yrs.My weight 65 kg and height 5'3".I take fish avg thrice in a week.Inspite of taking very less food and daily walking for 30 mins, i am still not able to reduce weight.my gallbludder was operated 6 yrs back.I do not feel sleepy in the night inspite of going to bed at 1045 pm.I get up at 0530 hrs for my son's school.My face is not glazy.I have normal sex life.Pl advice regarding my diet.
Answer : Dear Mrs. Pal, First of all, relax. You are not as overweight as you think. While most of us would like to be our ideal weight (in your case, about 52 kg), it is really not possible or desirable to attain this weight at this age. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight for height) is 25.3 which is slightly above the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. I suggest you aim for a slight weight loss of about 5 kg which will put you comfortably within the normal BMI range and also improve your health considerably. Second, I do not agree with the concept of taking very less food to lose weight. When we eat little food, our body goes into starvation mode. That is, the body becomes super efficient at making the most of the calories it does get from food and drink. It protects - rather than burns - the fat stores in the body, and unfortunately, this means that weight loss slows down. So, eating less is not the solution - you need to eat healthily and sensibly. While I do not know your current diet or lifestyle, I would recommend a 1200 calories diet for you. This should bring about a slow, steady and sustained weight loss of about 1-2 kg per month. Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Since you are a non-vegetarian, it may be a good idea to include one exchange of chicken or fish or egg at least once a day. Such a diet will also restrict your fat intake which is important since you do not have a gall bladder. At the same time, it is equally important to add on some exercise to your daily routine. You are already active in the house and walk for 30 minutes a day. Increase this to 40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training which will build up your muscles so that you burn calories even while you sleep. Strength training can be easily done at home with weights - take the help of a book or the local gym or trainer who can guide you on 10-15 minutes of strength training 4-5 times a week. Only a combination of diet and exercise will make you feel and look more healthy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Mrs
I am housewife aged 34 yrs having a son of 10 yrs.My weight 65 kg and height 5'3".I take fish avg thrice in a week.Inspite of taking very less food and daily walking for 30 mins, i am still not able to reduce weight.my gallbludder was operated 6 yrs back.I do not feel sleepy in the night inspite of going to bed at 1045 pm.I get up at 0530 hrs for my son's school.My face is not glazy.I have normal sex life.Pl advice regarding my diet.
Answer : Dear Mrs. Pal, First of all, relax. You are not as overweight as you think. While most of us would like to be our ideal weight (in your case, about 52 kg), it is really not possible or desirable to attain this weight at this age. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight for height) is 25.3 which is slightly above the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. I suggest you aim for a slight weight loss of about 5 kg which will put you comfortably within the normal BMI range and also improve your health considerably. Second, I do not agree with the concept of taking very less food to lose weight. When we eat little food, our body goes into starvation mode. That is, the body becomes super efficient at making the most of the calories it does get from food and drink. It protects - rather than burns - the fat stores in the body, and unfortunately, this means that weight loss slows down. So, eating less is not the solution - you need to eat healthily and sensibly. While I do not know your current diet or lifestyle, I would recommend a 1200 calories diet for you. This should bring about a slow, steady and sustained weight loss of about 1-2 kg per month. Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Since you are a non-vegetarian, it may be a good idea to include one exchange of chicken or fish or egg at least once a day. Such a diet will also restrict your fat intake which is important since you do not have a gall bladder. At the same time, it is equally important to add on some exercise to your daily routine. You are already active in the house and walk for 30 minutes a day. Increase this to 40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training which will build up your muscles so that you burn calories even while you sleep. Strength training can be easily done at home with weights - take the help of a book or the local gym or trainer who can guide you on 10-15 minutes of strength training 4-5 times a week. Only a combination of diet and exercise will make you feel and look more healthy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Mrs
I am housewife aged 34 yrs having a son of 10 yrs.My weight 65 kg and height 5'3".I take fish avg thrice in a week.Inspite of taking very less food and daily walking for 30 mins, i am still not able to reduce weight.my gallbludder was operated 6 yrs back.I do not feel sleepy in the night inspite of going to bed at 1045 pm.I get up at 0530 hrs for my son's school.My face is not glazy.I have normal sex life.Pl advice regarding my diet.
Answer : Dear Mrs. Pal, First of all, relax. You are not as overweight as you think. While most of us would like to be our ideal weight (in your case, about 52 kg), it is really not possible or desirable to attain this weight at this age. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight for height) is 25.3 which is slightly above the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. I suggest you aim for a slight weight loss of about 5 kg which will put you comfortably within the normal BMI range and also improve your health considerably. Second, I do not agree with the concept of taking very less food to lose weight. When we eat little food, our body goes into starvation mode. That is, the body becomes super efficient at making the most of the calories it does get from food and drink. It protects - rather than burns - the fat stores in the body, and unfortunately, this means that weight loss slows down. So, eating less is not the solution - you need to eat healthily and sensibly. While I do not know your current diet or lifestyle, I would recommend a 1200 calories diet for you. This should bring about a slow, steady and sustained weight loss of about 1-2 kg per month. Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Since you are a non-vegetarian, it may be a good idea to include one exchange of chicken or fish or egg at least once a day. Such a diet will also restrict your fat intake which is important since you do not have a gall bladder. At the same time, it is equally important to add on some exercise to your daily routine. You are already active in the house and walk for 30 minutes a day. Increase this to 40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training which will build up your muscles so that you burn calories even while you sleep. Strength training can be easily done at home with weights - take the help of a book or the local gym or trainer who can guide you on 10-15 minutes of strength training 4-5 times a week. Only a combination of diet and exercise will make you feel and look more healthy. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: Mrs
I am housewife aged 34 yrs having a son of 10 yrs.My weight 65 kg and height 5'3".I take fish avg thrice in a week.Inspite of taking very less food and daily walking for 30 mins, i am still not able to reduce weight.my gallbludder was operated 6 yrs back.I do not feel sleepy in the night inspite of going to bed at 1045 pm.I get up at 0530 hrs for my son's school.My face is not glazy.I have normal sex life.Pl advice regarding my diet.
Answer : Dear Mrs. Pal, First of all, relax. You are not as overweight as you think. While most of us would like to be our ideal weight (in your case, about 52 kg), it is really not possible or desirable to attain this weight at this age. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight for height) is 25.3 which is slightly above the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. I suggest you aim for a slight weight loss of about 5 kg which will put you comfortably within the normal BMI range and also improve your health considerably. Second, I do not agree with the concept of taking very less food to lose weight. When we eat little food, our body goes into starvation mode. That is, the body becomes super efficient at making the most of the calories it does get from food and drink. It protects - rather than burns - the fat stores in the body, and unfortunately, this means that weight loss slows down. So, eating less is not the solution - you need to eat healthily and sensibly. While I do not know your current diet or lifestyle, I would recommend a 1200 calories diet for you. This should bring about a slow, steady and sustained weight loss of about 1-2 kg per month. Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Since you are a non-vegetarian, it may be a good idea to include one exchange of chicken or fish or egg at least once a day. Such a diet will also restrict your fat intake which is important since you do not have a gall bladder. At the same time, it is equally important to add on some exercise to your daily routine. You are already active in the house and walk for 30 minutes a day. Increase this to 40 minutes 4-5 times a week. Add on some strength training which will build up your muscles so that you burn calories even while you sleep. Strength training can be easily done at home with weights - take the help of a book or the local gym or trainer who can guide you on 10-15 minutes of strength training 4-5 times a week. Only a combination of diet and exercise will make you feel and look more healthy. With best wishes Meeta Lall Question: Ganapathy I am having serious problem of flatulence, with passing of wind throughout the day. What is the cure? What food should I avoid? I am A non-vegetarian. This is the second time I am writing. Please reply. Thank you. Ganapathy. Answer: Dear Ganapathy, I have finally located your query and am responding to it: Everyone has gas and eliminates it by burping or passing wind through the anus. On an average, one passes gas 14-15 times a day and excretes about 700-800 ml of it each day. Although having gas is common, it can be uncomfortable and embarrassing particularly if you pass it more than the average person. Gas in our digestive tract comes from two sources: the air that we swallow while eating, drinking, chewing gum or smoking and the gas produced by fermentation (or breakdown by bacteria) of undigested foods in the large intestine. In specific, there are some foods that are known to produce more gas. These include: . Whole grains especially wheat, corn and oats. Noodles and bread containing yeast are other culprits. Rice is the only starch that does not cause gas. . Milk and dairy products especially if you are lactose intolerant . Pulses, beans and peas . Vegetables like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli and mushrooms . Roots such as potatoes and sweet potatoes, onions, garlic, radishes and turnips . Fruits like banana, apple, apricot, peach and pear as also packaged fruit juices and fruit-based drinks . Dried fruits such as raisins and prunes You will need to identify which foods produce large amounts of gas for you and then, limit their consumption. Since we Indians consume pulses on a daily basis, soaking them, boiling them in lots of water and removing the foam from top reduces the production of intestinal gas. Fermenting the pulses - as is done for making dosas, idlis as also soybean products miso and tofu) makes them less gaseous. Eating yoghurt along with meals also reduces flatulence. Check with your doctor about activated charcoal tablets which reduce both the amount and odor of flatus when taken immediately before food. Some digestive enzymes - tablets or syrup - may also reduce gas. In addition, you may try to: . Eat five smaller meals - three main meals and two snacks in-between - instead of three large meals. . Chew food carefully to ensure good digestion of carbohydrates. . Avoid lying down after eating since gas from the stomach passes into the intestines more readily in this position. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: nisha
I am Nisha, 25 years 5 feet hight and 36 kgs weight, married and mother of one child. My question: please suggest me a proper diet to put on weight. i dont have any other health problems.
Answer : Dear Nisha, You are quite underweight and need to put on at least 6-8 kgs. Since I do not know your current diet and lifestyle pattern, I suggest that you increase your daily intake by at least 500 to 1000 calories. Caution: The weight you gain should be a healthy combination of muscle and fat. Make sure that you include adequate proteins in your diet. So while you have the liberty of eating foods high in refined carbohydrates, fat and sugar (chocolates, pastries, cakes, jam, ice creams, pizzas, burgers and sandwiches), you will need to balance these with healthy foods like cheese/cottage cheese, yoghurt, pulses, lean meats like chicken and fish, nuts and seeds, raisins/dates, fresh fruit juices and energy-dense fruits such as banana, mango, cheekoo which are usually forbidden otherwise. You may add on these foods to your regular meals or as snacks in-between meals. Remember: . Increase the additional intake gradually to avoid gastric discomfort. . Eat 5-6 meals - three main meals along with 2 snacks in-between and a glass of milk at bedtime - regularly. Do not skip any meal. . Eat at meal times even if you are not hungry. . Make dishes which you like and enjoy . Sit down at a table for your meals. Cheer up the dining area by putting plants, flowers, colorful pictures. Put on some soothing music at mealtimes. Relax and eat your meal properly. . Savor each bite you eat. Most underweight people eat food very slowly. Increase the speed of your eating but chew it well. . You may consult your physician to prescribe a vitamin-mineral supplement. . Also, become more active. Take up walking and if possible, some strenuous exercise (badminton/tennis/swimming/cycling) which will build up your appetite and aid in digesting the extra food. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: A.C.Ashiq
I uderwent a surgery for intestinal tuberculosis 5 years back. Now I am fine but the only problem is that I have not puton any weight since then even though i eat gud food . I have got severe gastritis problem and if i eat little bit more I get diarrohea. So everyday i have got this I pass my stool atleast 6 times a day.My stomach will be blotting all the time.My doctor prescribed to take unienzyme tablets everyday which has not helped me.I find it so difficult to go out also.Kindly help me to get rid of this problem at the earliest
Answer : Dear Ashiq, To be on the safe side, I suggest you take a second medical opinion regarding your condition. At this stage, I feel you need medical advice more than nutritional. Once your doctor (or surgeon) has checked up your digestive system, we can then work out ways of keeping the diarrhea away. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Sachidananda
Vol. 25No. 32Date 8 July 2007i.e. Photos related to Freedom Movements of India
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Question by: D.MUTHUSSAMY
Madam,I suffered a brain tumour and now o.k.I am taking wysolone 5mcg on alternative days and testoviron 250mg/monthly once.My diet:3chapathis for b.fast,lunch and dinner with vegetables.A cup of curd rice for lunch.I also take mango, apple, c.apple, cucumbers,corn,boiled peanuts. apart from this itake dry grapes 50-75 nos. a day, to overcome constipation. Taking grapes is right or wrong?
Answer : Dear Mr. Muthussamy, Your diet seems to be fine as long as you are not putting on or losing too much weight. While there is nothing wrong with consuming dry grapes (I think you mean raisins or kishmish) for constipation, 50-75 grapes a day does seem too much. You may also consider eating other fiber-rich foods regularly such as: . dried figs or prunes . dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran . all pulses with the husk (chilka) . fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges and pears are rich in fiber . green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. . natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: RAHUL
Now a days the milk available in the market is adulturated. Kindly tell me-(i) How to identify the adulturated/synthetic milk; what are the harms by drinking this milk and how to counter the harms caused by it.(ii) If we do not drink milk then what would be the substitutes (especially for calcium deficiency) for the milk in veg category.
Answer : Dear Rahul, Milk adulterated with starch, paper pulp, refined oil, sugar, caustic soda, soap/detergent/shampoo and other harmful chemicals like hydrogen peroxide, zentamycin and urea has become a common problem nowadays. Consuming adulterated milk in the long run can harm our health and wreck our nervous and intestinal systems. While there are many complex tests to check milk for adulteration, there are two simple tests that can be carried out at home. To test the presence of soda: Take 5 ml of milk in a test tube and add 5 ml alcohol, followed by 4 to 5 drops of caustic soda. If the color of the milk changes to pinkish red, then it is likely that the milk is adulterated. To detect the presence of starch: Take 3 ml milk in a test tube and boil it thoroughly. Cool it to room temperature and add 2 to 3 drops of iodine solution. If the milk changes its color to blue, it indicates that it is adulterated with starch. It is best to buy branded and packaged milk from authorized dealers. For example, in Delhi, it is best to buy Mother Dairy milk from the Mother Dairy booths. Also, identify one big retailer near your home who sells the brand you like. Avoid buying loose milk from the local bhaiyya. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: HARDIK
Madam,i am suffering from frequent loose motions which are obstructing my day to day life.People tell me that due to unnecessary tension also it happens.Is it so?Kindly tell me the measures to avoid it.
Answer : Dear Hardik, I get the impression that you have been suffering from diarrhea for a long time. Is that so? Then, as a first step, you should consult a general physician. Frequent loose motions can be due to a number of reasons such as chronic viral infection, excessive consumption of alcohol, side effects of certain medications, drinking infected water, eating the wrong combination of foods and as your friends say, excessive stress and strain. Once the cause of the persistent diarrhea becomes clear, we will be able to work out an effective strategy. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: mrs
dear mamIam 43 years old and weight is now 79 kg,ht163cm. Iwas under strict self imposed diet.no rice or wheat ,mostly /bananna,vegetables and fish,curd/butter milk,two tea. with almost 1 hour daily at gym doing various excercises,nearly for 9 months.My weights drops to 74 and stays there. I was feeling healthy still recently Iwas down with a vires fever for a month. missed exercise and weight increased to 79 kgs.eating is almost stopped.kindly help me with your expert opinion to control my weight.Is "Nutralite" a protein supplyment by AMWAY any good? Amway is giving vitamin and amino acid supplyments.will you recomend me these items for weight control.
Answer : Dear Mrs. Sivadasan, I do appreciate your concern for being overweight though I strongly object to the strategy that you have adopted till now. Weight reduction in your case is important but not by forced fasting. Not eating will only worsen your case: weight reduction will only become more and more difficult as you keep yo-yoing between weight gain and weight loss. First, let's get a few facts straight: . Our body weight is a balance of what goes in (food) and what goes out (energy expenditure through work, exercise, body functions etc). We thus need to control both - reduce food intake and increase activity level - to ensure weight reduction. But both changes need to be done sensibly. . Weight reduction should occur slowly and steadily. A weight loss of 1-2 kg per month is ideal. . Any weight loss plan to be successful should fit into our routine well. Being women with great responsibility for home, children and work, we are less likely to devote extra time on taking special measures for ourselves. . A good weight loss plan teaches us to eat right for life. After all, how long can we forego eating? How long can we live on nutritional supplements? Why not learn to eat right so that we lose weight and then, stay that way? Mrs. Sivadasan, you need to start eating - and eating sensibly. To start with, I suggest you start on a 1200 calorie diet which will provide all the nutrients you need in the required amounts. Do not worry if you are losing weight on this diet or not. The first thing that needs to be done is to get you to eat the right foods. The breakup of the food groups is as follows: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Remember: . Do not miss meals. Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. . Small, frequent meals provide a steady supply of calories and keep hunger in control. Reduce portion size at each meal. Eat slowly and stop eating when slightly hungry. . Eat when you're hungry, not when you're bored or because you can't think of anything else to do. . Between-meal snacks are fine as long as you stick to low-calorie yoghurt, fresh fruit or unsweetened wholegrain biscuits. . Since you are not eating sugar/honey, don't be tempted to add artificial sweeteners. These sugar substitutes have far worse health effects upon the body than sugar itself. At the same time, keep up with the exercise. If you are not able to go to the gym - don't worry. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes 5 days a week! So take up any physical exercise you like. I always suggest walking for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week as an ideal exercise. Also increase your activity levels within and outside the house. Follow this regime for a few days and you will find you are already feeling better (and lighter). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: P
I am 48 years old and a diabetic for the last 8 years. I also suffer from BP and Cholesterol. I have acidity problems also. My diabetes is under control and I do not take any medicines for the same. I am taking ayurvedic medicine for BP and with that the same is under control. Presently, I am taking allopathic medicine for Cholersterol and once I stop medicines the cholesterol level increases. I used to walk for one hour daily.My doctor advised to take a 1500 calorie diet every day. Could you please advise me 1500 calorie diet for me. I usually take Dalia porridge without milk and sugar for the breakfast, chappatis for lunch and rice for dinner and one or two fruits daily.
Answer : Dear Mr. Vijayaraghavan, Yes, I agree. A 1500 calorie diet should be suitable for you. As you mention, your diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol are under control with medicines. Do continue taking your cholesterol medicine to keep the cholesterol in check. I will also suggest some food and lifestyle tips which could help in lowering your blood cholesterol. First, the 1500 calories diet: Cereals - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots and tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 1 medium potato or 3 small arbis) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) No added sugar/honey is advised for diabetes. Also avoid artificial sweeteners totally since they may actually aggravate the condition. If you like, you may use Stevia, a natural sweetener which is harmless. Now, for the cholesterol-reduction: As a first step, you need to eliminate or at least drastically limit foods that contain saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. Avoid: . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). At the same time, you need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Continue your 1 hour walks for at least 4-5 days in a week. . If you smoke, quit immediately. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sharada
what food to avoid with cholestrol above average level. if range is 13 i hv 24. which food is good to reduce cholestrol level.
Answer : Dear Sharada, Reducing blood cholesterol is the first, and the most important, step in preventing heart disease. This is particularly important if you are overweight or have high blood pressure and/or diabetes. The first step in lowering blood cholesterol is to forego cholesterol-rich foods. However, foods low in cholesterol may still be high in saturated fat or trans fat - other types of fats which raise cholesterol levels higher much more than cholesterol-rich foods. So, you need to eliminate or at least drastically limit foods that contain saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. Avoid: . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). At the same time, you need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Increase physical activity to at least 30 minutes on most days. . If you smoke, quit immediately . Cut down on sugar and salt intake considerably If you have been prescribed any cholesterol-reducing drugs, do check with your physician regarding their potential side effects in the long term. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: R.
I am right now five month pregnant.Please tell me what to have during these days till the end of my pregnancy. Any time table schedule, I should follow. All are telling to eat more. But I dont feel like to eat more. Kindly tell what to eat / drink and timings (intervals) to have a healthy baby. Thank you.
Answer : Congratulations Diana! You are now responsible for your precious baby's health! What you eat and drink will directly affect your child both before birth and in his/her later life. A healthy diet will also make sure that you do not have any complications during pregnancy. But first let me caution you: Pregnancy is not a time for overindulgence. It is the time to eat sensibly and healthily. Since you are now in the fifth month, it is time to increase your regular food intake by ONLY about 300 calories, 15 g protein and 10 g fat. This can be easily done by adding on an additional exchange of cereal (30 g) combined with an exchange of pulse (30 g) or milk (100 ml), one exchange of vegetable and/or fruit (100 g each) and 1-2 exchanges of fat (5-10 g). These foods can be either added on to your regular meals or eaten as an additional snack during the day. Since you will need greater amounts of vitamins (like vitamin A, vitamin C, folic acid, B-complex vitamins) and minerals (like iron, calcium and iodine as well as copper, chromium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium etc.) eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. Try new foods. Cook new recipes. Select assorted fruits and vegetables daily. Make your meals colorful. I am sure your doctor has already recommended some iron (combined with folic acid and zinc) supplements. In all, you should be consuming three main meals, two snacks (one mid-morning and one evening) with a glass of milk at bedtime if you like. At the same time, avoid caffeine through tea, coffee, colas. Do not take any herbal drugs or "natural" supplements without medical advice. Avoid smoking, tobacco chewing, and alcohol. Avoid artificial sweeteners such as Equal, Sugar Free totally. Do not drink diet colas or desserts/ mithai containing them. To avoid infections, eat only well-cooked food. Remember, fresh is best for you and your baby. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: RAJALAKSHMIMR(PREMA)
Dear MeetaThanks a ton for replying my mailand for good advice, for the last 20days iam doing yoga that has started showing some difference but iam a very poor eater i don't take any thing in the morning and in the afternoon ii try to take some fruits like pear, papaya and at night 2or 3 rotis with anyvegetable and at times i take rice also,now pl advice me whati shoul eat and how much i shouldeat.and pl also advice me how to reduce my belly.iam sorry if iam bothering you to much.regardRajalakshmi
Answer : Dear Prema, You seem to be making good progress. Go ahead. Keep up with the diet you are following and record the progress. Yoga will also help in reducing your belly. Keep it up! With best wishes Meeta
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Question by: uday
hello madam, iam uday 20 years old i have no weight as per my height.my height is 5'10 and weight is 57.i have to improve my weight.can u suggest that which dite is better to my problem.
Answer : Dear Uday, You are a tall young man who seems to be more worried about his weight than he should be. Yes, you could do with some more weight (about 6-8 kgs at the most) but remember, this weight should come from muscles not fat. So what should you do? Eating a balanced diet with adequate protein along with plenty of exercise should do the trick. I would suggest a diet which provides about 2400-2500 calories with a breakup as follows: Cereals - 10 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots and tubers - 1 exchange (1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) In addition, take up some vigorous exercise like tennis or squash at least twice a week. Also join a gym where you can do strength training to build your muscles and improve your personality. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: V.Gnanam
My wife and self are 58 years old.1.Do you recommend conuming milk. if not, what is the alternative for Calcium requirementof the body?2.Pl. send me a list of Fiber rich food items which are commonly / practically available in the market.Thanks and Regards,V.GNANAM
Answer : Dear Mr. Gnanam, Yes, the elderly should definitely drink milk (at least two glasses per day) particularly since their calcium requirements are higher than adults. Calcium prevents bone loss with age (osteoporosis) and thus acts as an anti-aging agent. Elderly women, in particular, need adequate amounts of calcium to offset menopausal changes. Although osteoporosis occurs years later in men, they too need to make sure they get enough calcium. A new study in New Zealand has shown that drinking a glass of chocolate milk after a nice stroll improves muscle function in the elderly. However, if you have a problem in digesting milk, try curd (buttermilk/lassi/etc) which is better digested. Other non-dairy sources of calcium that you can opt for soy products (soybeans, soy flour and tofu); peas and beans; almonds; green leafy vegetables like mustard/turnip/radish greens, spinach and broccoli; oranges; dried figs and brown sugar. Fiber in our diet is also very important to prevent constipation, piles, etc. Fiber-rich foods include: Whole grains: Whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta contain fiber-rich bran. Avoid refined flour (maida) products like white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges and pears are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. You may also like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pawan
I am 68 years old. I feel difficulty in ejeaculation.Almost nil one or two drops of sperm. Erectyal dyfuction is another problem. What's remdey?
Answer : Dear Pawan, I think you need to consult a sexologist. You can write to De Narayana Reddy at THE WEEK. With best wishes Meeta Lall
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Question by: P
you have failed me very, very badly. You never cared to answer my question though I sent it several times. I won't bother you again. goodbye.
Answer :
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Question by: deepak
hi,am a 23year old guy,five feet seven inch,i love my girl so much and want to keep her happily... i dont feel that any food habits can cure this still thought of asking u... i relized that when i have sex i cum really soon... am a vegetarian and so can u suggest some safe medicine to overcome this,
Answer : Dear Deepak, I really think you should consult a sexologist or write to Dr Narayana Reddy at THE WEEK With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: deepak
hi,am a 23year old guy,five feet seven inch,i love my girl so much and want to keep her happily... i dont feel that any food habits can cure this still thought of asking u... i relized that when i have sex i cum really soon... am a vegetarian and so can u suggest some good food habits to overcome this,if there is any
Answer : Dear Deepak, I really think you should consult a sexologist or write to Dr Narayana Reddy at THE WEEK With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: P
you have failed me very, very badly. You never cared to answer my question though I sent it several times. I won't bother you again. goodbye.
Answer : Dear Mr Ganapathy, I do not think I have received any food-related question from you. If you have sent it, please do resend it since it may have got diverted to another site. Meeta Lall
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Question by: Roshan
Madem,I am having problem of constipation and doctor is telling it is early stage of piles also.My age is 31 year.What kind of diet i should take?
Answer : Dear Roshan, Constipation and piles can be quite troublesome. Using laxatives to relieve constipation makes the bowels dependent upon them. Do not use laxatives at all. The key to relieving constipation and piles lies in eating high fiber foods. A high-fiber diet causes a large, soft, bulky stool that passes through the bowel more easily and quickly. Fiber, or roughage, is that part of a plant that cannot be digested by the body. Experts recommend a daily intake of 25-30 g of fiber in the diet to prevent and ease constipation. This can be easily achieved by eating a balanced diet which contains adequate helpings of the following fiber-rich foods: Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges and pears are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . You may also like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Roshan
Madem,I am having problem of constipation and doctor is telling it is early stage of piles also.My age is 31 year.What kind of diet i should take?
Answer : Dear Roshan, Constipation and piles can be quite troublesome. Using laxatives to relieve constipation makes the bowels dependent upon them. Do not use laxatives at all. The key to relieving constipation and piles lies in eating high fiber foods. A high-fiber diet causes a large, soft, bulky stool that passes through the bowel more easily and quickly. Fiber, or roughage, is that part of a plant that cannot be digested by the body. Experts recommend a daily intake of 25-30 g of fiber in the diet to prevent and ease constipation. This can be easily achieved by eating a balanced diet which contains adequate helpings of the following fiber-rich foods: Whole grains: Wheat bran is largely fiber. Go in for whole wheat products such as dalia, suji and atta instead of refined flour (maida). Avoid white bread, biscuits, pasta, noodles and naan/bhatura. Use brown rice instead of white rice. Brown bread with added fiber is good. Cornflakes and rice flakes are pretty low in fiber - opt for dalia, oatmeal or cereals fortified with bran. Pulses: especially the ones with husk (chilka) are great sources of fiber. Make sure you eat at least two servings of dal everyday. One serving in lunch and the other can be eaten as sprouts, dishes made from besan or nutrinuggets Fruits and vegetables - Eat at least 2 servings of fruits and 3-4 servings of vegetables everyday. Fruits such as apples, bananas, guavas, oranges and pears are rich in fiber. Avoid fruit juices - eat the whole fruit with skin and pulp. Figs, raisins, prunes and raspberries have the highest fiber content. Green leafy vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, methi, chaulai and bathua are rich in fiber. Other vegetables such as beans, broccoli, peas, turnips, carrots, potatoes (with skin) are all excellent sources. To increase your fruit intake, add dried fruit to porridge, cereal or milk puddings; slice a banana on your breakfast cereal; or go in for fruit-based desserts to mithai, cakes and ice creams. In addition: . Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly to allow the digestive system to work well. . Eat meals at regular intervals . You may also like to add some bulk-forming natural laxatives such as Psyllium husks (isabgol) which are available commercially. Or simply buy flax seeds (or alsi) which is rich in fiber: add two tablespoons of freshly ground flax to yogurt, cereal, sauces, or anything that you choose. . Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. In addition, warm lemon water and vegetable juices are good. . Take up some regular exercise such as walking or jogging. Exercise shakes up the bowels, reduces the transit time of stools through the long intestine and ensures that it is softer by the time it reaches your rectum. . Don't ignore the call to pass stools. Don't be embarrassed to leave the table or keep people waiting. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: subba
I am subscriber of the magazine week. My age is 41 years male and day to day i am becoming fat and i am purely vegetarian. please advise me about diet and nutrition.subba raju
Answer : Dear Subba, You have not mentioned your height or weight so it is difficult for me to ascertain to what degree you are overweight. Nevertheless, I appreciate your concern about putting on weight since most obesity-related problems such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease start showing up in the 40s. For detailed dietary guidance, I suggest you consult a weight management expert in your area who can analyze your profile (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to MODIFY your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about weight loss. I recommend a 1500 calories diet which will not only stop you from putting on further weight but will also bring your weight down to your ideal weight gradually. Cereals - 6 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Milk - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots and tubers - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 1 medium potato or 3 small arbis) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/honey - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Remember, a good weight loss diet plan teaches you to eat right for your entire life. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Mrs
Madam, I have undergone hysterectomy recently. I request you to advise me the diet to be followed. I get pain in the legs very often and feel exhausted at the end of the day when I return from my office. Thank You.
Answer : Dear Mrs. Vidhya, Hysterectomy is a major operation and takes some time for recovery. Eating a balanced diet with lots of fluids is important during this recovery phase. Since your exercise is pretty limited, your diet should be a healthy one and should prevent weight gain. At the same time, it should also contain lots of proteins to ensure steady healing of the wound. I recommend a 1875 calorie diet with adequate amounts of proteins for you. This should take care of all weakness resulting after surgery. Cereals - 8 exchanges (1exchange = 30 g or 1 medium chapati or 1 small plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1exchange = 30 g or 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1exchange = 50 g or 2 medium pieces or 1 egg Milk (skim) - 3 exchanges (1exchange = 100 ml or ½ glass or 1 katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1exchange (1exchange = 100 g or 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1exchange = 100 g or 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Roots & tubers - 1exchange (1exchange = 100 g or 1 large potato) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1exchange = 100 g or one small apple/orange/pear) Fats - 4 exchanges (1exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) Sugar/honey - 4 exchanges (1exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) If you are a vegetarian, substitute the meat exchange with 1 exchange of pulse or milk. Note that you should restrict your fat intake: do not consume more than 20 g of added fats/oils in your cooking. You may like to add nuts especially 6-8 almonds to your diet - go ahead. If you are not cooking yet, you will need to quietly supervise the cook to ensure that he/she keeps the fat content of your meals within limits. Also, vitamin C is also helpful after surgery: Eat lots of citrus fruits such as oranges and lemon; guava; berries; kiwi fruit, tomatoes etc. To ensure adequate fluid intake, drink coconut water and nimbu paani 2-3 times a day in addition to 10-12 glasses of plain water. Don't turn to food to help you relieve of boredom or stress or post-operative depression. Eat 5-6 small meals (3 meals with 2 main snacks and an after-dinner drink of hot milk) during the day. Snacking continuously throughout the day on biscuits, cakes, toast and jam, crisps and sugary drinks is the surest way to gain weight and delay recovery. Also, do mention the pain in your legs to your gynecologist to rule out any complication post-surgery. The key is not to worry too much. As you recover, you will feel better, lighter and happier. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: C
MadamA Doctor has informed that my wife has stones in the gall bladder. Kindly advise me whether it is possible to remove the stones through any food/fruit/diet. Thank You.
Answer : Dear Rajkumar, Having stones in the gall bladder (or gallstones) does not always mean surgery. Though diet cannot really shrink existing stones, it can help small ones excrete into the gut. Also, a proper diet can reduce painful spasms in the abdomen due to the gallstones. A low-fat diet is the key to managing gallstones. The total amount of fat/nuts in the day's diet should not be more than 3 teaspoons (15 g). This includes nuts and oilseeds (5 g fat is equal to 6 almonds/ 20 small peanuts/ 2 whole walnuts/ 18 pistachios). Avoid saturated fats like desi ghee, butter, vanaspati, coconut oil and palm oil totally. Substitute cold-pressed olive oil as much as possible for your normal cooking oil. Milk & milk products: Prefer skim milk and products (cheese/paneer/curd/kheer/etc) made from it. Give up whole milk/cream/desi ghee/butter as well as products made from it such as readymade curd/yoghurt/paneer/cheese/cheese spreads/etc Bread & grains: Fiber is especially good in eliminating gallstones. Consume breads and chapatis made from whole wheat flour (atta) preferably chakki-ground; oatmeal, jowar/bajra and brown rice. Avoid foods made from refined flour (maida) such as breads/rolls/biscuits/sweet rolls/pastries/cakes/brownies. Do not eat potato chips, French fries and fried rice. Vegetables: Go for all vegetables which are steamed, raw, boiled, or baked without added fat. Totally avoid fried vegetables or those made in lots of ghee/oil/cream/cheese. Make salads with celery and crisp fruits and vegetables. Meat/chicken/fish: Eat chicken without skin and eggs (boiled without any added fat) twice a week. Do not eat red meat (goat/beef/veal/pork) or fatty fish/ fish canned in oil. Sugar/sweets & desserts: Avoid white sugar totally. Consume desserts naturally sweetened with fruits. Almost all Indian sweets are made with whole milk and lots of sugar - both of which are harmful for gallstones. Stop all mithai. Totally avoid ice cream, pastries, cakes, cookies, chocolates, pies, and doughnuts as well as puddings/custards/kheers made from whole milk or cream. Other tips which can benefit your wife: . Consume small meals during the day; avoid large meals especially before bed time . Avoid carbonated drinks as they can trigger the movement of the stone causing more pain. . Try to maintain a normal body weight. If overweight, try to lose weight slowly and steadily. Do not go in for binge or purge diets. . Take fish oil capsules which contain omega 3 oils which block formation of cholesterol and thus, gallstones. . Add lots of ginger and turmeric to food. Turmeric enhances the flow of bile while ginger aids in the digestion of fat. . Consult the doctor and start taking a good multi-vitamin and mineral supplement. Vitamin E is especially good. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ARUN
Hai!Iam 19 years old.In my class many boys are doing masturbation.Is it that good one or bad one?Please give a detail notes about that.thanks...
Answer :
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Question by: subba
I am subscriber of the magazine week. My age is 41 years male and day to day i am becoming fat and i am purely vegetarian. please advise me about diet and nutrition.subba raju
Answer : Dear Subbu, I will be replying to you shortly. Meeta Lall
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Question by: deepak
hi,am a 23year old guy,five feet seven inch,i love my girl so much and want to keep her happily... i dont feel that any food habits can cure this still thought of asking u... i relized that when i have sex i cum really soon... am a vegetarian and so can u suggest some safe medicine to overcome this,
Answer : Dear Deepak, You need to consult your doctor for your problem. with best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: lakshmi
my name is lakshmi.i am 28 years old.i am an indian.my weight is 66kg.Doctors said ur weight is 10 kg extra.please tell me how to loose my weight.
Answer : Dear Lakshmi, You have not mentioned your height - you have only written that you are 10 kgs overweight. So, let's take it from there. Our body weight is a balance between how much goes in and how much gets used up - so successful weight control needs to place equal importance on dietary modification and regular exercise. While you can consult a weight management expert in your area who can guide you on a daily basis, I suggest a reduction of about 500 calories from whatever you are eating currently. This will be adequate to bring about the required weight loss. While I do not know your current daily intake, I suppose a 1200 calories diet (as given below) will take care of your weight loss. Remember, weight loss does not occur immediately. It takes about 5-6 weeks in the beginning for the weight to start dropping regularly and then at least 6-8 months for you to achieve the target weight. 1200 calories diet plan for adult woman Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) At the same time, start exercising. Unlike popular belief, you need not join a gym or exercise vigorously to lose weight. Start walking 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week in combination with 10-15 minutes of strength training or yoga 3-4 times a week. You can take up any exercise you enjoy - swimming, playing badminton/tennis etc. You will maintain body tone and feel energized all day! Remember: . Weight loss is a complex process and takes time: about 1-2 pounds a week. . Skipping meals causes sudden hunger pangs leading to bingeing. People who skip breakfast become so hungry by lunch that they end up eating more calories! . Small, frequent meals provide a steady supply of calories and keep hunger in control. Reduce portion size at each meal. Eat slowly and stop eating when slightly hungry. . Increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effects as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes, 5 days a week! . Building muscle mass - by strength training or even regular exercise - burns calories even when we sleep! I hope you are successful. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Anns
Hello Madam.. I am 34 years old diagnosed with Diabetes and having medication. I like fruits but not sure which all fruits are safe and also want to know whether having heavy breakfast and then light lunch and dinner is okay. I drink lot of water and few cups of tea.
Answer : Dear Anns, Hello. Since you have diabetes, you need to make sure that your meals do not make your blood sugar swing from very high to very low during the day. This means that you need to eat well-balanced meals which provide roughly the same amount of carbohydrates. Make sure you do not skip any meals. Eat a proper breakfast. Have two snacks during the day in-between meals. Do not go more than three or four hours without eating. Also, eat meals and snacks at roughly the same time each day. It's good that you drink lots of water especially because dehydration can be particularly dangerous in people with diabetes. A few cups of tea (2-3 in a day) is fine but avoid too much of it as also coffee, colas (even diet colas) and alcohol. Now to the specific question as to which fruits are good for you: Three fruits in particular are good for diabetes - apples, jamun and grapefruit (a citrus fruit with a unique favor though not commonly found in India). Fiber-rich fruits like guava, watermelon, muskmelon, papaya, strawberries and plums are also good since they do not raise blood sugar level very much. However, high sugar fruits like banana, mango, custard apple (also called shareefa or seetaphal), chickoo, and grapes are best avoided. Also avoid sweet dry fruits like dates, dried prunes, figs etc. Fruit juices are not good since they contain too much sugar. Moreover, plenty of fruit is required to make one glass of juice. Eat at least two portions of fruit everyday. One portion of fruit is equivalent to one medium-sized fresh fruit apple or pear or two small fruits such as apricots/plums/kiwi or a cupful of berries/grapes/raspberries or a large slice of watermelon/muskmelon/ pineapple/papaya. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sheela
Is it OK for someone with hypertension(140/90)and high level of cholesterol (260 mg)to take chyawanprash (1 tsp per day)
Answer : Dear Sheela, Chyawanprash is an ayurvedic tonic made of nearly 40 herbs. It is said to improve digestion, bolster the immunity system, aid longevity and fight depression. While I am not aware of any research which contraindicates the use of chyawanprash when a person has hypertension and high blood cholesterol, I would caution against its use. Tonics like chyawanprash use desi ghee as their base which is definitely not advisable with high blood cholesterol. So I suggest foregoing chyawanprash when a person has hypertension and high blood cholesterol level. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Tanvi
what are the best fruits for teenagers?!
Answer : Dear Tanvi, The teenage years are special years. Being a teenager, you are now capable of making your own food choices which suit your school/college timings as well as social interests. Fruits will play an important part in your diet since vitamins and minerals are very important during this period. So, eat at least 3-4 portions of fruits every day. All fruits are good for you. In fact, at this age, you can afford to eat even the carbohydrate-dense fruits like bananas, mangoes, chickoo and custard apple (shareefa or seetaphal), dried fruits like dates, figs and prunes. Try to eat a fruit at every meal. Eat more fruits as dessert and snacks. Start every day with a glass of fresh fruit juice. (Caution: Limit fresh fruit juices to 2 cups per day to prevent diarrhea and avoid packaged jucies which are sugar-rich). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: gee
how to reduce bad cholestrol
Answer : Dear George, Reducing bad (or LDL) cholesterol in blood is the first, and the most important, step in preventing heart disease. This is particularly important if you are overweight or have high blood pressure and/or diabetes. The first step in lowering blood cholesterol is forego cholesterol-rich foods. However, foods low in cholesterol may still be high in saturated fat or trans fat - other types of fats which raise cholesterol levels higher much more than cholesterol-rich foods. So, you need to eliminate or at least drastically limit foods that contain saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. Avoid: . Saturated fats-rich foods such as red meat (goat, beef, pork, veal); desi ghee; butter; whole milk and yogurt/cheese/paneer/ice cream made from it; poultry skin and palm oil . Trans fats-rich foods such as vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, packaged baked goods, potato chips, snack foods, fried foods, and most fast foods. . Cholesterol-rich foods including egg yolks, shellfish, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain etc) and foie gras Choose: . Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain cereals; all dals (especially ones with chilka) and peas; oats; fruits such as apples, blackberries, pears, raisins, oranges, grapefruit, dates, figs, prunes and apricots; green leafy vegetables and other vegetables such as lotus stem, broccoli, etc . Omega-3 rich foods like fatty fish (salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters); fish oil supplements; flax seeds (or alsi) as oil (one teaspoon every day) or powder (two tablespoons with water) or as flax oil capsules; walnuts, tofu (soymilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. . Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil which can substitute the routine cooking oil. Canola oil, almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachio nuts and natural peanut butter are also good sources. . Lean meats such as chicken (skinless), turkey and fish as well as egg whites. . Natural foods known to lower cholesterol such as soybeans (as flour added to wheat flour, nutrinuggets or soy granules); fenugreek (as a spice to vegetables or a teaspoonful in powdered form) and amla (powdered or fresh). At the same time, you need to bring about some lifestyle changes: . Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. . Increase physical activity to at least 30 minutes on most days. . If you smoke, quit immediately . Cut down on sugar and salt intake considerably If you have been prescribed any cholesterol-reducing drugs, do check with your physician regarding their potential side effects in the long term. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sudha
Dear madam,This is sudha of age 24 height 5feet.3inches weighing of 68 kgs.i am a software Engineer.could you please suggest the diet plan for me . i am very much conserned about my weight that aws getting increasing.because of lower back pain iam unable to take up the house hold activities also,request you to suggest me plan that was suitable.thanks sudha
Answer : Dear Sudha, You are a young girl ready to take on the world! You can only do this if you keep in perfect health: this means attaining a good weight for your height and also dealing with any other physical problems like your back pain. For your height, your weight should be within 50 - 55 kg. This means that you are about 12 - 14 kg overweight. For this, you will need to make changes both in terms of diet and activity. Also, do not expect or try to lose weight in a matter of days or weeks. It will take at least 6-9 months for you to reach your ideal weight, and then, a lifetime of discipline to maintain it at that. First the diet: Since your work does not allow for much activity, I would say that to bring about weight loss, you will need to consume about 1000-1200 calories per day. This will ensure that you lose weight gradually ~ about 2 kgs every month. Given below are the approximate amounts of different food groups that you can eat during the day: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 2 pieces or 1 egg) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 1 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) You will note that there is no sugar and very limited amount of fat in your diet. As far as exercise is concerned, a young girl like you should take up one moderate exercise such as walking (30-40 minutes everyday 4-5 times a week) and one vigorous activity (swimming/playing badminton or tennis at least 2-3 times a week). In addition, do some strength training with weights for 10 minutes 3-4 times a week - this can be easily done while you watch TV. Or try yoga which will also help stretch and strengthen muscles and improve posture. This combination of exercises will help you lose weight and also reduce your back pain. While I feel pain in your lower back is mainly due to poor posture and excess weight, it is better if you see your doctor to rule out major injuries, trauma or degenerative conditions in your back. If your doctor gives you the okay, start strengthening your back today. As a first step, correct your posture throughout the day: don't slouch while standing, sitting at work or in your car. You are a software engineer which requires long hours in front of the computer. Make sure your desk is at a comfortable height for you. Sit in a chair which supports your lower back. Keep your shoulders back. Switch sitting positions often and periodically walk around the office or gently stretch muscles to relieve tension. A pillow or rolled-up towel placed behind the small of your back can provide some lumbar support. If you must sit for a long period of time, rest your feet on a low stool. Wear comfortable, low-heeled shoes. Sleep on your side to reduce any curve in your spine. Always sleep on a firm surface. Don't try to lift objects too heavy for you. Sudha, if you smoke, quit. Smoking reduces blood flow to the lower spine and causes the spinal discs to degenerate. I am sure if you are sincere and dedicated to your diet and exercise plan, you will soon be lighter and fitter. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Radha
My height is 5ft 6" and weigh 70 kgs. I am a vegetarian. Please suggest a suitable diet to reduce at least 10kgs over a period of three months. Thanks.
Answer : Dear Radha, First of all, relax. You are a tall girl and for your height, your weight should be between 61-65 kg. So, you are not as overweight as you think. You need to bring your weight down by 5-7 kg at the most. Remember, this weight loss should be steady and gradual: about 2 kgs a month. So it should really take abut 4-6 months for your excess weight to go. While I do not know your current food consumption and activity patterns, reducing your caloric intake by about 500 calories from whatever you are eating every day should do the trick. To guide you, I am giving below a 1200 calories diet. Remember, weight loss does not occur immediately. It takes about 5-6 weeks in the beginning for the weight to start dropping regularly. 1200 calorie diet: Cereals - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Milk (double toned/skim) - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 2 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 3 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) At the same time, start exercising. Unlike popular belief, to lose weight, you need not join a gym or exercise vigorously. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effect as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes, 5 days a week! I always recommend walking 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week in combination with 10-15 minutes of strength training or yoga 3-4 times a week. Or take up any exercise you enjoy - swimming, playing badminton/tennis etc. You will maintain body tone and feel energized all day! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: benny
i am 25 years old , 182 cm height,and weigh 127 kg . what is the way to reduce my weight?
Answer : Dear Benny, You are a tall person and for your height, your weight should be between 75-80 kg. This means that you are carrying almost 50 kg extra weight. Considering your age, there is urgent need to bring down your weight as much as possible within the next two years. Losing weight is a complex process and should be done under expert guidance and supervision. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert in your area who will analyze your physical and biochemical profile in detail (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to change your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about the extreme weight loss. Some doctors may suggest treating your weight problem surgically. These surgical procedures - gastric bypass and gastroplasty - reduce the size and capacity of the stomach from bottle to small glass size. While these methods are successful in bringing about weight loss and have become increasingly popular in the West, experts caution that gastric bypass is major surgery and should not be undertaken lightly. I suggest that in consultation with your weight management expert, you work out a comprehensive plan which will include calorie restriction, exercise, lifestyle modification and psychological counseling. Also, try to involve your family members since this will ensure greater success in achieving the weight loss and further, maintaining it. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: venkatesh
Dear Doc, My eyes most often will be very dry...please suggest some good food so that my eyes remain moist..
Answer : Dear Venkatesh, Dry eyes are usually due to a lack of sufficient tears in the eye. Tears are essential for good eye health. They bathe the eye, washing out dust and debris and keeping the eye moist. They also contain enzymes that neutralize the microorganisms that colonize the eye. In the dry eye syndrome, the eye does not produce enough tears or the tears have a chemical composition that causes them to evaporate too quickly. This could be due to natural aging process, as a side effect of medicines, or simply because you live in a dry, dusty or windy climate. Air conditioning or a dry heating system too dry out the eyes. Working on the computer or wearing contact lens all day can also cause dry eyes. I suggest you consult an eye doctor locally so that he can ascertain the cause of your dry eyes and accordingly, prescribe some medication (usually lubricating eye drops that alleviate the feeling of dryness in the eyes). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: prakash
I am 25, working a sotware company.My weight is 55,height 171cm.My face is not very chubby, it look dull , lot of scars. Though i look fair i am not looking good.My legs are always tired.Please suggest some food for my life style.
Answer : Dear Prakash, You seem to be a hardworking young man and there is no reason why you should not be the picture of health. You are 171 cm tall: your ideal weight should be at least 64 kg. At the moment, you are 55 kg and are slightly underweight. You also look and feel dull. So, what you really need along with hard work is a good, healthy, balanced diet. Remember: you can only work hard if you are healthy. So, what should you eat? Well, a young man like you whose job is essentially sedentary requires a 2400 cal diet. 2400 calorie daily diet for an adult man (sedentary work) Cereals - 12 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 medium chapati/ 1 slice bread/ 1 plate rice) Pulses - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 30 g or equivalent to 1 katori cooked dal) Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 1 exchange (1 exchange = 50 g or equivalent to 2 medium pieces or 1 egg) Milk - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 ml or equivalent to ½ glass or 1 small katori curd) Green leafy vegetables - 1 exchange ((1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 tablespoon cooked greens) Other vegetables - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to 1 small katori cooked vegetable) Fruits - 2 exchanges (1 exchange = 100 g or equivalent to one small apple/orange/pear) Fats/ Nuts - 5 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon or 7-8 nuts) Sugar/ Honey - 4 exchanges (1 exchange = 5 g or one teaspoon) In addition, you need to make sure that you: . eat 5 regular meals a day: 3 main meals with two snacks in-between and possibly, a late night glass of milk . don't skip any meals . avoid eating too many fried snacks and fast foods like pizza, burger, hot dogs etc . limit excessive salt and sugar intake . drink at least 8-10 glasses of water a day, and . drink alcohol in moderation (not more than 5-6 drinks a week) Also add exercise to your routine which will bring a natural glow to your face and improve your posture. Walk for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. If you like, you may also visit the gym once or twice a week to keep you looking good and energized all week. To be on the safe side, I suggest you also visit your general physician and get yourself a thorough medical checkup to rule out any underlying illness. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: mini
who is the editor of the week now?
Answer :
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Question by: TAS
I got vessel blocks as per the Angiogram conducted. I am asked to go for By-pass surgery. As i am now regularly walking in the morning and evening,controlling diet and taking regularly medicines prescribed,I am feeling better. so, Surgery is postponed.Please suggest diet as per you.
Answer : Dear Narayana, It is good that you have taken your angio results seriously and have actually managed to postpone surgery through discipline in diet, exercise and medicines. Your diet needs to be one which keeps the fats in your blood low, maintains a normal blood pressure (below 140/90) and keeps your weight in the acceptable range. Remember one thing: A healthy diet for the heart need not be miserable or boring. You need not deprive yourself of your favorite foods - just make healthy choices which keep your meals interesting and full of variety. As a first step, you need to keep the fat content of your diet low. It is important to eat not more than 2-3 teaspoons (10-15 g) of fats and oils in a day. Stop eating the unhealthy fats such as butter, ghee, vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, mayonnaise and other readymade spreads. Use healthy oils such as olive oil, safflower/ sunflower/ soybean/ corn/ canola/ groundnut oil. Choose blended oils (containing more than one oil) specially designed for a healthy heart. At the same time, consume non-fat dairy products: Use double toned/skim milk and make curd and paneer from it. Readymade paneer and cheese are very high in fat - avoid. Opt for low fat meats such as chicken and fish. Avoid red meat, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain, etc) totally. High-fat foods like cakes and biscuits, fried foods, namkeens, mithais, ready-to-eat curries, restaurant curries are definitely NO-NO. Make your diet filling by eating whole grains (atta, brown rice, oats, etc) instead of refined foods like white bread, pasta, maida, etc and lots of pulses. Add lots of high fiber vegetables and fruits - remember to avoid the high carbohydrate vegetables such as potato, arbi (colocasia), sweet potato, yam etc as well as high carbohydrate fruits like bananas, mangoes, chikoos and pineapple. Do not eat canned fruits at all. Besides food, exercise is very very important as you very well know. Walking for 30 minutes 4-5 times a week reduces the risk of heart disease by one-third and also lowers blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Also, if you smoke, quit smoking immediately. Limit your salt intake to maintain a normal blood pressure: add salt sparingly in cooking food, remove the saltshaker from the table, quit eating pickles, chutneys and sauces and avoid savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos and namkeens. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: TAS
I got vessel blocks as per the Angiogram conducted. I am asked to go for By-pass surgery. As i am now regularly walking in the morning and evening,controlling diet and taking regularly medicines prescribed,I am feeling better. so, Surgery is postponed.Please suggest diet as per you.
Answer : Dear Narayana, It is good that you have taken your angio results seriously and have actually managed to postpone surgery through discipline in diet, exercise and medicines. Your diet needs to be one which keeps the fats in your blood low, maintains a normal blood pressure (below 140/90) and keeps your weight in the acceptable range. Remember one thing: A healthy diet for the heart need not be miserable or boring. You need not deprive yourself of your favorite foods - just make healthy choices which keep your meals interesting and full of variety. As a first step, you need to keep the fat content of your diet low. It is important to eat not more than 2-3 teaspoons (10-15 g) of fats and oils in a day. Stop eating the unhealthy fats such as butter, ghee, vanaspati, margarine, butter substitutes, mayonnaise and other readymade spreads. Use healthy oils such as olive oil, safflower/ sunflower/ soybean/ corn/ canola/ groundnut oil. Choose blended oils (containing more than one oil) specially designed for a healthy heart. At the same time, consume non-fat dairy products: Use double toned/skim milk and make curd and paneer from it. Readymade paneer and cheese are very high in fat - avoid. Opt for low fat meats such as chicken and fish. Avoid red meat, organ meats (liver, kidneys, brain, etc) totally. High-fat foods like cakes and biscuits, fried foods, namkeens, mithais, ready-to-eat curries, restaurant curries are definitely NO-NO. Make your diet filling by eating whole grains (atta, brown rice, oats, etc) instead of refined foods like white bread, pasta, maida, etc. Add lots of high fiber vegetables and fruits - remember to avoid the high carbohydrate vegetables such as potato, arbi (colocasia), sweet potato, yam etc as well as high carbohydrate fruits like bananas, mangoes, chikoos and pineapple. Do not eat canned fruits at all. Besides food, exercise is very very important as you very well know. Walking for 30 minutes 4-5 times a week reduces the risk of heart disease by one-third and also lowers blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Also, if you smoke, quit smoking immediately. Limit your salt intake to maintain a normal blood pressure: add salt sparingly in cooking food, remove the saltshaker from the table, quit eating pickles, chutneys and sauces and avoid savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos and namkeens. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pooja
When is the best time to have fruits? Can we have them along with the food?
Answer : Dear Pooja, While fruits are great at any time of the day, the best time to eat them is immediately upon waking. During the night, our body uses up all the glucose stored in the liver and now turns to muscles for energy. Eating fruit immediately upon waking provides an alternate energy source and thus prevents muscle breakdown. Pineapple, honeydew melon, oranges, bananas and kiwi are good morning fruits. It is also beneficial to avoid combining fruits with other foods. Avoid eating any other food 30-40 minutes before/after eating fruits. This is why fruits make for ideal snacks at mid-morning and evening. They are refreshing, fill the stomach and yet, are not calorie-dense. Another good time to eat fruit is 30-60 minutes before a workout. Pears, watermelon, apples, grapes, strawberries and raspberries are good pre-workout fruits. After your workout, fruits like cherries and peaches are ideal. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Sujata
Whether MEAL REPLACEMENT THERAPIES are useful in reducing weight?and do not cause any harmful side effects?I am 39 years old 5feet tall and weigh 62Kgs
Answer : Dear Sujata, Yes, you are slightly overweight. Your BMI (or the Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight for height) is 26.6 which is higher than the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9. I suggest a weight reduction of 5-7 kg: a weight of 55 kg for your height will ensure that your BMI is about 24 which is well within the acceptable range. So, should you use meal replacement therapy? Well, meal replacement programs or formula diets come in a variety of forms. In the form of drinks or powder or bars, they provide a balanced amount of carbohydrates, proteins, fats with adequate vitamins and minerals. Research has shown that they do reduce weight and are usually considered safe. Such diets appeal to some people because they allow them to avoid making choices about food. Personally, I do not recommend such therapy. A good weight loss plan is one which fits into your lifestyle easily, is non-cumbersome and does not require any major alterations. An out-of-the-way plan is unlikely to be followed for the entire plan period. Also, a good diet plan teaches you to make healthy choices while losing weight and later, to maintain the reduced weight. For you Sujata, losing 5-7 kg should not be a problem with certain dietary restrictions. I suggest you reduce your dietary intake by about 500 calories from whatever you are eating currently. At the same time, start walking for 30-40 minutes at least 4-5 times a week; also, go in about 10 minutes of strength training (that is, weight training) or yoga about 3-4 times a week. This should reduce your weight by 5-7 kg over 4-5 months. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: b.a.nazeer
I am 44 years old.My BP LEVEL is 140/95 and having gastritis problems. my belly sometimes like baloon. Please suggest proper nutritional suggestions to control my BP and eliminate gastritis
Answer : Dear Nazeer, I am listing a few tips for controlling your blood pressure as well as gastritis. I also suggest that you visit your general physician who will be better able to judge your condition and suggest medicines, if required. To avoid gastritis: . Avoid fried and spicy foods, pickles, canned foods, junk foods like burgers and pizzas, artificially ripened fruits and vegetables, colas, very cold beverages, too much tea and coffee, chocolates and pastries as also raw salad vegetables. . Do not skip meals; eat five meals a day - three main meals with two small snacks in-between. . Eat only when hungry . Avoid stress. . Drink coconut water, butter milk, yoghurt, cucumber juice and lemon water. Include mint water, fennel (saunf) water or zeera water in-between. . Eat dinner 2-3 hours before going to bed. . Sitting in the vajrasana after meals allows food to pass down the gut nicely. The kunjal kriya (stomach wash) and pranayam (breathing exercises) of yoga are also good. . Drink 8-10 glass to water daily . Sleep with your head and shoulder on a high pillow for elevation . Avoid short term relief measures such as digestive salts or antacids sine they do not provide a long-term solution . If overweight, try to lose some. . If you smoke, quit. Avoid alcohol totally . Become physically active. To control your blood pressure: . Our daily requirement of salt is only 6 grams. So, add salt sparingly in cooking food. . Avoid processed foods - cakes, biscuits, cookies, cheese, cake/pudding mixes, cornflakes, canned foods and fruit juices, foods with artificial sweeteners - totally since they contain sodium derivatives . Avoid fast foods - pizzas, burgers, samosas, pakoras and chowmein. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces. . Avoid savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Even harmless medicines like antacids contain a lot of sodium. Avoid. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: sushma
i am 28 yrs old i am carrying i am already fat, so what precaputions we have to take maintain my figure
Answer : Dear Sushma, When you say fat, what do you mean? Since you have not sent me your weight and height details, I am unable to classify you as overweight or obesity. I suggest that you consult a weight management expert in your area who can analyze your profile (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to MODIFY (and not drastically change) your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about weight loss. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: k
Dear Madam,I am 51, 5'.9", 70 kgs.I am very conscious about health and hygiene. Suffering from High BP for the last seven years, after medication the level is 130/90(taking Amlopress 5 and Listril plus - one tab. each daily)I had also been suffering from breathing problem. Now it is under control with regular morning walk and some yoga.I prefer veg.food, but take non veg. occasionally (once in a month). I do not smoke,avoid hot drinks, cool drinks and food from outside, including fast food. I shall be grateful if you could advice me a balanced diet.I like seasonal fruits and vegetables, drink 8-10 glasses of boiled water daily.I fully avoid - banana, curd, icecream, guava. I go to bed at 10 pm and wake up at 4.30 am.RegardsSomanPs: I came to know about you through The Week magazine.
Answer : Dear Soman, Your daily routine indicates your very disciplined lifestyle. Indeed, discipline is the first step in managing any problem in life. You are not overweight. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index - a measure of weight in relation to height) is 22.7, which is well within the normal range of 18.5 - 24.5. This means that whatever you are eating is fine. However, just take care that your weight does not go up. Your only problem at the moment seems to be your blood pressure which is also, to a large extent, under control. Some more tips for managing your blood pressure: . Our daily requirement of salt is only 6 grams. So, add salt sparingly in cooking food. . Avoid processed foods - cakes, biscuits, cookies, cheese, cake/pudding mixes, cornflakes, canned foods and fruit juices, foods with artificial sweeteners - totally since they contain sodium derivatives . Avoid fast foods - pizzas, burgers, samosas, pakoras and chowmein. . Remove the saltshaker from the table. . Do not eat pickles and sauces. . Avoid savory snacks like potato chips, salted nuts, popcorn, wafers, nachos with salsa, namkeens and samosas. . Even harmless medicines like antacids contain a lot of sodium. Avoid. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Rajendra
I am a diebetic patient since last one year. I control my sugar level by exercise and abstaining food items like, sugar, potato and rice etc.My problem is I feel very tired throughout the day.I am not able to concentrate on my job due this problem. I also got checked my thyroid and that is normal.kindly suggest me north indian vegetarion diet.Regards,
Answer : Dear Rajendra, It is good that you understand the importance of controlling your diabetes through regular exercise and diet control. This is the first step in effective diabetes management and will help you greatly in the long term. But are you checking your blood glucose levels on a day to day basis? Are they in control? How frequently do you visit your diabetes doctor? Have you mentioned this problem of being tired all day to him? The tiredness may be because your sugar levels are progressively not under control. Please do visit your doctor as a first step. As far as diet is concerned, I suggest that after visiting your doctor, you send me your details regarding age, weight, height and your diabetes status. Till then . With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Suresh
I am having problem with my stomach for the past two decades.I have acidity, gas problem and off late almost every alternate month i have stomach bloating and pain for a couple of days.I get acidity if i drink tea, eat fried and oily food , eggs, chicken etc.Kindly advise safe foods for acidity and gas.How can one evaluate the performance of his digestion system as awhole .Are any tests available
Answer : Dear Suresh, First of all, I would like to suggest that you consult your general physician for your problems. If required, he may refer you to a gastro-enterologist who will evaluate your digestive system entirely. In general, avoid foods which you know give you acidity. Also avoid fried and spicy foods, pickles, canned foods, junk foods like burgers and pizzas, artificially ripened fruits and vegetables, colas, very cold beverages, too much tea and coffee, chocolates and pastries as also raw salad vegetables. Other tips for avoiding acidity and gas: . Do not skip meals; eat five meals a day - three main meals with two small snacks in-between. . Eat only when hungry . Avoid stress. . Drink coconut water, butter milk, yoghurt, cucumber juice and lemon water. Include mint water, fennel (saunf) water or zeera water in-between. . Eat dinner 2-3 hours before going to bed. . Sitting in the vajrasana after meals allows food to pass down the gut nicely. The kunjal kriya (stomach wash) and pranayam (breathing exercises) of yoga are also good. . Drink 8-10 glass to water daily . Sleep with your head and shoulder on a high pillow for elevation . Avoid short term relief measures such as digestive salts or antacids sine they do not provide a long-term solution . If overweight, try to lose some. . If you smoke, quit. Avoid alcohol totally . Become physically active. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: chandan
mam can i know what are the types of food is recommended so that i can have a healthy hair.......
Answer : Dear Chandan, All the expensive beauty care products in the world cannot give us a healthy, glowing look without help from our diet. Our hair is made up of protein: eat lots of proteins every day - dals, milk, paneer/cheese, yoghurt, nuts and meat/chicken/fish/eggs. Soy protein - as beans, flour, nuggets, or tofu - strengthens hair and stimulates its growth. If you are a non-vegetarian, eat lots of fish: the essential fatty acids in fish oil add luster to hair. Fried, baked, gravy or grilled - try to fit in fish into at least one of your daily meals. Nuts - groundnuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel nuts and so on - are high in vitamin E and help in growing vibrant hair. Make snacking on 8-10 nuts during the day a habit. All berries - strawberries, raspberries, blue berries, black berries, cranberries, currants and purple grapes - are loaded with antioxidants. They lessen the negative effects of the sun's harsh rays on hair. Grab a handful of berries every day and feel the difference. Other vitamin C rich fruits like oranges, nectarines, lemon and guava are excellent. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: RAJALAKSHMI
Dear MeetaIam 36 My weight is 63 hight is 5fit1inch.This is my third mailpl advice me to how to reduce weight and what i should eat whento eat please advice me regardsRajalakshmi
Answer : Dear Rajalakshmi, I hope you have received my earlier mail. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: RAJALAKSHMI
Dear MeetaIam 36 My weight is 63 hight is 5fit1inch.This is my third mailpl advice me to how to reduce weight and what i should eat whento eat please advice me regardsRajalakshmi
Answer : Dear Rajalakshmi, Although your ideal weight for height should be about 48 kgs, it is not really desirable or realistic to try to achieve this weight. Instead, your aim should be to achieve a moderate loss of 5 to 6 kgs so that your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of body weight in relation to height) falls in the normal range of 18.5 - 24.9). at present, your BMI is 26.2; when you weigh 57 kgs, it will come down to 23.7 which is quite normal for your height. Please understand that you do not need drastic weight loss measures. A loss of 5-6 kgs can be easily achieved over 6 months. You need to aim to lose about 2 kgs every month. After you achieve your target weight, the focus will be on maintaining that weight. Now what should you do? While you can consult a weight management expert in your area who can guide you on a daily basis, I suggest a reduction of about 500 calories from whatever you are eating currently. This will be adequate to bring about the required weight loss. While I do not know your current daily intake, I suppose a 1200 calories diet (as given below) will take care of your weight loss. Remember, weight loss does not occur immediately. It takes about 5-6 weeks in the beginning for the weight to start dropping regularly. The 1200 calories diet plan for adult woman Food exchange - Size of exchange - Exchange equivalent - Exchanges/ day Cereals 30 g 1 chapati/1 small plate rice 5 Pulses 30 g 1 katori cooked dal 2 Meat/chicken/fish/egg 50 g 2 medium pieces or 1 egg 1 Milk (double toned/skim)100 ml ½ glass or 1 katori curd 2 Green leafy vegetables 100 g 1 tablespoon cooked greens 2 Other vegetables 100 g 1 small katori cooked vegetable 2 Fruits 100 g One small apple/orange/pear 2 Fats 5 g One teaspoon 3 At the same time, incorporate some exercise in your daily routine. Step up your routine activities which require physical work. Walk regularly for 30-40 minutes at least 4-5 times a week; also, throw in about 10 minutes of strength training (that is, weight training) about 4-5 times a week. Or take up any exercise you enjoy - swimming, playing badminton/tennis etc. You will maintain body tone and feel energized all day! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: prakash
I am vegetarian. During Annual health check ups, frequent complaint is lack of iron, B12.I am also looking for best source of omega3. Egg is fine to limited extent. Please advice what food combination is good for this. This advise will be useful for all my vegetarian family members.
Answer : Dear Prakash, Getting enough iron from a vegetarian diet is usually difficult. Although green leafy vegetables, cereals (wheat, ragi, jowar, bajra), pulses (especially sprouted pulses), dates, and jaggery are good sources, very little iron from these foods is actually absorbed in the intestine. To some extent, eating vitamin C rich foods such as lemon, orange, guava, amla, green mango along with food helps in iron absorption. In fact, for the women in your family, it may be advisable to take iron-folic acid supplements in consultation with a doctor. As for vitamin B12, vegetarians can best get the vitamin through milk and milk products (cheddar cheese, etc) and eggs. You may also look for foods fortified with vitamin B12. such as yeast extracts, soya milks, vegetable and sunflower margarines, and breakfast cereals. Omega-3 fats are essential fats required for normal functioning of the brain. They are also called 'happy' fats since they fight depression and stabilize our moods. These fats are not so common in our diets. Although most fatty fish such as salmon, halibut, trout, sardines, mackerel and oysters are rich in these, vegetarians will need to obtain their requirement from fish oil supplements. Flax seeds (or alsi) are also rich in omega-3: one teaspoon of flaxseed oil or two tablespoons of freshly ground flax seeds daily provides omega-3s adequately. Flax oil is now also available in vegetable capsules. Walnuts, tofu (soyamilk curd) and green leafy vegetables (especially broccoli and cabbage) are also good sources. Also, it may be a good idea to start using some amounts of olive oil or rape seed oil in cooking food. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: aditya
From 10 years i am suffering from obesity. I felt shy and started doing exercises and dieting.i am doing exercises for 2 hours per day.With in two months i lost 16kgs.now my weight is 89 kgs.my diet plan is as follows- Morning-honey with water,afternoon-3 carrots n 2 tomatoes,night-2 carroys n 2 tomatoes.but my friends warned me when u eat normally u will gain the lost weight rapidly.Are they right?from August i am going to college and i planned to do exercise for 1 hour.i am also suffering from abdominal distension.please suggest me a diet plan to maintain the constant weight and not to grow the weight.
Answer : Dear Aditya, I appreciate your concern for your excess weight especially since you have had it for a long time. Yes, you do need to bring it under control through a combination of diet and exercise. But this has to be done under absolute attention from a professional. As far as your diet is concerned, I am concerned about it. Is this all you are having? This is a severely calorie restricted diet which may not be advisable at all. Your friends are quite right - you will definitely gain weight once you start eating normally. Also, hardly having any food will cause stomach distension. The best strategy for weight loss diets should always be that they fit into your existing dietary pattern, teach you to eat right for life and offer sensible advice on exercise. I suggest you consult a weight management expert in your area who can analyze your profile (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to MODIFY your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about further weight loss and then, sustain that lowered weight forever. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: mini
What should be the ideal diet for a forty plus lady whose job needs her to sit before the sytem from 9am - 5pm. I'm 5 feet tall and weigh about 55kg. I walk about 2km a day from home to bus stop and back. Of late, due to strain, I was sweating profusely and felt very weak. Honestly, I couldn't go to a doc for want of time; but I took lots of glucose and pickle rice (as friends suggested that it could be low BP); now I feel better; also summer heat is also not there now. Ma'am, considering these, please suggest me proper diet. My periods are irregular too. I'm single.Regards,mini
Answer : Dear Mini, I am concerned about your health. Please, please go to a doctor and get yourself checked. Sweating profusely and feeling weak can be due to the summer heat but it may also be due to some changes inside your body. Your periods are also not regular. Do take out the time to go to your gynaecologist since what can be more important than our health? The doctor will check you up and put you on the right course of action. Also, you are not overweight. Your BMI (or Body Mass Index a measure of weight relative to height) is 23.7 well within the normal range of 18.5 to 24.9. Once you are clear about your condition - it may be as harmless as the early warning signs of approaching menopause - we will work out a suitable diet for you. Do not take glucose, pickle rice or any other foods just because your friends suggest these. They may have an adverse effect. Till then . With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: ravi
my 4 year old son does not drink milk, hardly 100 ml daily, but eats about 200 ml of curds. what is the optimum amount of milk or milk products one should have at this age. what should be his optimum weight and height, he weighed 3.2 kg at birth
Answer : Dear Ravi, Don't worry. Your son does not seem to enjoy milk: No problem. Let him eat curd instead which is definitely better digested and builds healthy gut bacteria. Ideally, your son should be consuming about 500 ml of milk so try giving him more curd or milk in the form of ice cream, kheer, custard etc. Remember, at this age, children have a low interest in foods and develop food jags: that is, they refuse previously accepted foods or ask for the same food at each meal. So, do not force the issue - let the child be. Your son was born with a healthy weight of 3.2 kg - a good start definitely. He is now 4 years old and should have an optimal weight of 17 kg (acceptable range being 13-24 kg) and height of about 102 cms (acceptable range being 91-104 cm). With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: shasikala
I am 33yrs old,height-5.4,weight 60ks.,Question : What should be the weight, to mintain same/ increase what should i eat,how much !thanks,BHAGYA
Answer : Dear Shasikala, Great going! Why do you need to worry about what to eat and how much? You are doing just fine. While your ideal body weight for your height should actually be about 55 kgs, your existing weight of 60 kgs is fine. Do not think that you are 5 kgs overweight: the notion of weighing your ideal body weight is passé. Instead, it is healthier to be in the range of acceptable body weight as indicated by the Body Mass Index or BMI Your BMI (a measure of weight relative to height) is also 22.6 well within the normal range (18.5 - 24.9). So, as long as you are maintaining this weight of 60 kgs, it is fine. However, considering that you are 33 years old and over time, your metabolism will slow down (that is, your body will burn fewer calories with a greater tendency to store fat), it may be beneficial to step up your activity levels. Walk regularly for 30-40 minutes at least 4-5 times a week; also, throw in about 10 minutes of strength training (that is, weight training) about 4-5 times a week. Or take up any exercise you enjoy - swimming, playing badminton/tennis etc. You will maintain body tone and feel energized all day! With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: Bhagya
I am 33yrs old,height-5.8,weight 63kgs.,Question : What should be the weight, to mintain same/ increase what should i eat,how much !thanks,BHAGYA
Answer : Dear Bhagya, No worry. Keep up whatever you are eating and doing! Your body weight for height is ideal! Your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight relative to height) is also 21.0 well within the normal range (18.5 - 24.9). So, as long as you are maintaining this weight of 63 kgs, it is fine. However, considering that you are 33 years old and that your metabolism will slow down over time (that is, your body will burn fewer calories with a greater tendency to store fat), it may be beneficial to step up your activity levels slightly. This will ensure that you build and retain muscle tone as well as maintain a healthy metabolism. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: shyla
Dear Meeta,My name is Shyla. I am 38 years old and have two kids (boys). I have a major weight problem. Myweight has always been 45-46 kgs and never more than that. I am 5 3" tall. Now my weight has increased to 49 kgs and I am happy about it. But the problem is that I seem to put on weighton my stomach, thighs and legs.From the stomach upwards, I am very thin and my bones can be counted at the sides and also my breasts have sagged and havebecome flat.I want to know why I am not able to put on weight upwards?Can you please tell me what to eat to put on weight upwards?Can you please reply to my query?ThanksShyla
Answer : Dear Shyla, First, you do NOT have a weight problem. You are 5'3'' tall and while your ideal weight should be 52.4 kgs, your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight relative to height) is 19.1 well within the normal BMI category (18.5 - 24.9). So, cheer up! You are one of the few who can eat to their heart's content! You are not alone when you mention that most of your weight lies around your stomach and thighs. Women do tend to deposit fat around their middle. This is why the shape of women is usually called pear-shaped! Also, don't lose heart. Sagging or drooping of breasts is a natural, inevitable process that happens to all women as we move towards menopause. Remember, breasts do NOT have muscles; they are only fat supported by ligaments and skin. Regular exercise can definitely help change your body shape. Try strength training, that is, exercising with weights. This will tone up your chest muscles and make your upper body bulkier but this will not lift the breasts themselves. Likewise, herbal remedies, creams, or lotions that are advertised to tone, enhance, or firm up breasts might make the skin on or around the breasts feel smoother or firmer, but cannot tighten skin or ligaments that have been stretched. Even "breast lift" surgery, which typically removes extra skin and tissue from the breast and tightens and lifts the remaining skin, or adds implants to maintain structure, is only a stopgap measure - "lifted" breasts will once again respond to the call of gravity as the skin and ligaments are gradually stretched over time. The one thing you can try is to help your skin elasticity nutritionally - maybe it will also help those ligaments to stay in top fit. . Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables which are rich in vitamins A, C and E and also minerals. . Cook food with extra virgin olive olive instead of regular oils . Eat foods with more fiber and also protein rich foods which will help in ligament formation . Limit your intake of coffee, colas, chocolates and strong tea as also alcohol. Shyla, you could do with some more weight - go ahead and eat fully and completely. Most importantly, don't worry about your figure so much. I am sure you are the one with concerns about your figure and not the people around you who love you. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: leelasubbaiah
which fruite is good for health.timings to eat breakfast/lunch/dinner.excercisegood food to eat,oil,meati am 47 year old women
Answer : Dear Leela, I will answer your questions one by one. First: Which fruit is good for health? Well, any fruit is good fruit but some are better. Eating fruit regularly lowers the risk of cancer, stroke, and heart disease especially fruits which are rich in vitamins A and C as well as calcium, potassium, iron and fiber. Believe it or not, guava, when in season, tops all fruits in nutritive value. It is also very reasonably priced and can be bought by the kilo for the whole family. Oranges, apples, pears, watermelon and papaya are also good fruits. Bananas are great value for money but are also rich in calories, so watch out. One medium banana is calorically equal to two chapatis! Avoid canned fruit since it is full of sugar. dried fruits such as figs, prunes and dates are low in vitamin C but still good sources of fiber and potassium. Next: How much should you eat? I only know your age but not your weight, height or activity level. I am giving below a diet plan for an adult woman with sedentary activity and the approximate portion sizes of each food group. 1875 calorie diet plan for adult woman - sedentary activity Food exchange - Size of the exchange - Exchange equivalent in household measures - Total no of exchanges in a day Cereals - 30 g - 1 medium chapati or 1 small plate rice - 10 exchanges Pulses - 30 g - 1 katori cooked dal - 1 exchange Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 50 g - 2 medium pieces or 1 egg - 1 exchange Milk (double toned/skim) -100 ml- ½ glass or 1 katori curd - 3 exchanges Green leafy vegetables - 100 g - 1 tablespoon cooked greens - 1 exchange Other vegetables - 100 g - 1 small katori cooked vegetable - 2 exchanges Roots & tubers - 100 g - 1 large potato - 1 exchange Fruits - 100 g - One small apple/orange/pear - 2 exchanges Fats - 5 g - One teaspoon - 4 exchanges Sugar/honey - 5 g - One teaspoon- 3 exchanges i hope the above information originally in table format will be clear to you. Remember, adult years are the time for caution: . Frequent small meals - three main meals and 2-3 snacks in-between - are better than having 3 large meals in a day . Eat a wide variety of foods so that you meet your requirement for all nutrients. . Choose whole grain cereals (roti instead of naan, brown bread instead of white), as well as fruits and vegetables with more fiber (apple with skin, whole orange instead of juice, green leafy vegetables instead of colocasia, etc). . Limit red meats to once a month. . Avoid excessive salt in food. Get out of the habit of using table salt. Limit papads, pickles, sauces, chips, cheese, etc. . Processed foods like readymade soups, pasta, canned foods, bakery products, breakfast foods, junk foods like chips, candies, chocolates etc are unhealthy. Avoid them totally. . Avoid overeating and take up any physical exercise for 30 minutes a day as many as five times a week. . Drink about 8-10 glasses of water every day. Limit intake of colas, tea and coffee since they dehydrate the body. Restrict daily alcohol intake to no more than one drink: if possible, avoid totally. . Women in particular need adequate calcium and iron. Have lots of dairy products as well as fish, vegetables such as broccoli and spinach, and fortified cereals and grains. Eat iron-rich foods like meat/chicken/fish as well as green leafy vegetables. In consultation with a doctor, start taking iron-folic acid supplements. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: anitha
i am 5 months pregnant. i would like to know about my diet.
Answer : Congratulations Anitha! You are now responsible for your precious baby's health! What you eat and drink will directly affect your child both before birth and in his/her later life. A healthy diet will also make sure that you do not have any complications during pregnancy. But first let me caution you: Pregnancy is not a time for overindulgence. It is the time to eat sensibly and healthily. Since you are now in the fifth month, it is time to increase your regular food intake by ONLY about 300 calories, 15 g protein and 10 g fat. This can be easily done by adding on an additional exchange of cereal (30 g) combined with an exchange of pulse (30 g) or milk (100 ml), one exchange of vegetable and/or fruit (100 g each) and 1-2 exchanges of fat (5-10 g). These foods can be either added on to your regular meals or eaten as an additional snack during the day. Since you will need greater amounts of vitamins (like vitamin A, vitamin C, folic acid, B-complex vitamins) and minerals (like iron, calcium and iodine as well as copper, chromium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium etc.) eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. Try new foods. Cook new recipes. Select assorted fruits and vegetables daily. Make your meals colorful. I am sure your doctor has already recommended some iron (combined with folic acid and zinc) supplements. At the same time, avoid caffeine through tea, coffee, colas. Do not take any herbal drugs or "natural" supplements without medical advice. Avoid smoking, tobacco chewing, and alcohol. Avoid artificial sweeteners such as Equal, Sugar Free totally. Do not drink diet colas or desserts/ mithai containing them. To avoid infections, eat only well-cooked food. Remember, fresh is best for you and your baby. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: nandakumar
i would like to reduce my wt. i am a borderline diaebetic.i had enrolled in many diet program viz. atkins,dietone etc the recipe suggested doesnot suit indian condition i had to drop out.i am a keralite born and bred up in chennai. could u pl suggest something indian
Answer : Dear Nandakumar, I hope my answer to your earlier mail satisfies you. Do let me know if you need any further clarifications. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: pratik
my weight is 79 kg my height is 5'8'can u provide me proper diet schedule to loose my weight
Answer : Dear Pratik, Considering your height and weight, your BMI (or Body Mass Index which is a measure of weight relative to height) is 26.5. This means that you are above the normal category (BMI = 18.5 - 24.9) and fall in the overweight category (BMI = 25.0 - 29.9). While your ideal body weight should be 66.4 kg, it is almost impossible and not really desirable to achieve this ideal weight. Instead what we really need to do is to bring you in the normal BMI range. So, if you bring down your weight to about 70-72 kg, you would have a good BMI of about 23.7. All you need to now do is reduce your weight by about 7-8 kgs. Remember, this weight loss should be steady and gradual: about 2 kgs a month. So it should really take abut 4-6 months for your excess weight to go. Since I do not know your current food consumption and activity patterns, it would be better if you consult a local weight management consultant or dietitian who can estimate your current intake and reduce your caloric intake by about 500 calories per day. This will ensure the required gradual weight loss. Most likely, it will be a 1500 calorie diet like the one given in the table but please check with your dietitian. At the same time, start exercising. If you are already exercising, step it up. Remember to exercise according to your age, condition and comfort level. To lose weight, you need not join a gym or go in for something equally vigorous. Research shows that increasing physical activity by 30 minutes a day has the same effects as exercising vigorously at a gym for 20-60 minutes, 5 days a week! So take up some activity which you like and enjoy. With best wishes, Meeta Lall 1500 calorie weight reducing diet plan Food exchange- Size of the exchange -Exchange equivalent in household measures - Total no of exchanges in a day Cereals - 30 g - 1 medium chapati or 1 small plate rice - 5 exchanges Pulses - 30 g - 1 katori cooked dal - 2 exchanges Meat/chicken/fish/egg - 50 g - 2 medium pieces or 1 egg - 1 exchange Milk (double toned/skim)- 100 ml- ½ glass or 1 katori curd - 3 exchanges Green leafy vegetables - 100 g - 1 tablespoon cooked greens - 2 exchanges Other vegetables - 100 g - 1 small katori cooked vegetable - 2 exchanges Roots & tubers - 100 g - 1 large potato - 1 exchange Fruits - 100 g - One small apple/orange/pear - 2 exchanges Fats - 5 g - One teaspoon - 3 exchanges Sugar/honey - 5 g - One teaspoon - 2 exchanges I hope the above information originally in table format will be clear to you.
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Question by: nandakumar
i want to reduce my wt.ihave joined many outfits but could follow the dietplan since it all based on foreign diet plan.couid u suggest some new outfit where i can enroll myself and follow indian(southindian precisely)diet plan
Answer : Dear Nandakumar, You are right. Any diet plan can be successful only when it fits into your very own dietary habits and lifestyle. One thing about diet plans which most of us do not realize is: no two individuals are the same. They do not gain weight the same way; they do not lose weight the same way. Every individual has his own key to weight management which cannot be found in standard diet plans. In fact, for effective weight loss, there is no need to follow a prescribed diet plan and then try to fit it in your routine. You will never be able to sustain this and follow it for life. I suggest you consult a weight management expert in your area who can analyze your profile (age, weight, height, fat distribution etc) as well as your existing diet and activity levels. The expert can then suggest ways in which you need to MODIFY (and not drastically change) your habits - both diet-wise and activity-wise - to bring about weight loss. Remember, a good weight loss plan teaches you to eat right and exercise right for your entire life. With best wishes, Meeta Lall
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Question by: anitha
i am 5 months pregnant. i would like to know about my diet.
Answer : Yes, Anitha. I will be replying to you tomorrow. I have already worked out the answer Meeta
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Disclaimer 
All content  provided is for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. The information given here is not intended to diagnose, prescribe, treat or cure. Always consult your own doctor if you're in any way concerned about your health.